• Subjective experiences of participatory arts engagement of healthy older people and explorations of creative ageing

      Bradfield, E.; University of Derby (Elsevier BV, 2021-08-04)
      The aim of this article was to report findings from a qualitative focus group study conducted to understand the subjective experiences of community-dwelling healthy older people engaging in a range of participatory arts activities. The article also uses the participants' voices to consider nuances and interconnections of themes to unpack the complexities of ‘participatory arts’ engagement and support a conceptualisation of ‘creative ageing’. This study involved qualitative focus group interviews. Focus group interviews were conducted with five groups of healthy older people (aged ≥50 years) living in the community (i.e. not in residential care settings). Participants were recruited through self-selected sampling, and on the basis of self-reporting, no diagnosis of ill-health. Focus group interviews were digitally recorded and analysed using thematic analysis. Themes developed from a systematic review of participatory arts for promoting well-being in later life conducted previously by the author were used as the stimulus for conversation in the focus groups. Interviews were not transcribed, rather pseudonymised quotations are used to support the themes. The study also explored barriers to participation, although these findings are not reported here. Subjective experiences of participatory arts engagement of healthy older people focused on everyday creativity and reflections on the term ‘participation’, which challenge the traditional focus of arts and health research on the effects of active engagement. Healthy older people experienced a sense of achievement and ‘flow’ through creative engagement, which led to opportunities for social interaction and developing a sense of purpose. Through transitions of ageing, older people found creative ways of rediscovering their identity in later life, which supported resilience and highlighted a connection between body, mind and soul. Findings suggest that participation in everyday creative experiences can lead to a sense of achievement and purpose, which provides support and structure in the construction of changing identity in later life. Participatory arts engagement is particularly instrumental during transitions of ageing. This study provides a conceptualisation of ‘creative ageing’ which challenges traditional ideas of ‘participatory arts’ and audience engagement by focusing on subjectivities of the participant voice. The framework moves debate beyond a focus on the efficacy of arts engagement to consider the relevance of subjective experiences of everyday creativity in later life.
    • The flows of compassion in adolescents as measured by the compassionate engagement and action scales

      Cunha, Marina; Galhardo, Ana; Gilbert, Paul; Rodrigues, Cátia; Matos, Marcela; University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal; University of Derby (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2021-07-23)
      The development of self-report instruments assessing the different facets of compassion adapted for different age groups is crucial for research and clinical practice. This study examined the factor structure and psychometric properties of the adaptation to adolescents of the Compassionate Engagement and Action Scales (CEAS-A) in a sample of 674 Portuguese adolescents. Confirmatory factor analyses showed that the factor structure of the CEAS-A was similar to the one found in the adults’ version, with higher-order factor models encompassing two first/s-order factors in each scale (Engagement and Actions). The CEAS-A revealed good construct validity, reliability, and temporal stability. Gender differences were found in Self-compassion and Compassion for Other scales. Path analysis results indicated that self-criticism had a direct negative impact on adolescents’ life satisfaction, whereas the impact of self-reassurance on life satisfaction was partially mediated by self-compassion and compassion from others. The CEAS-A is the first self-report instrument that allows for the assessment of the three different flows of compassion in adolescents and may be an important and useful tool for research and clinical practice.
    • The role of perceived descriptive and injunctive norms on the self-reported frequency of meat and plant-based meal intake in UK-based adults

      Sharps, Maxine; Fallon, Vicky; Ryan, Sean; Helen, Coulthard; De Montfort University; University of Liverpool; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2021-07-28)
      Perceived social norms refer to beliefs that people hold about what other people do (descriptive norms) and approve of (injunctive norms), and are associated with food intake. However, less is known about whether perceived social norms are associated with meat and plant-based meal intake. Using a cross-sectional survey design 136 participants (aged 19-66 years, mean age=39.63, SD=12.85 years, mean BMI=25.77, SD=5.30, 80.9% female, 77.9% omnivores, 22.1% flexitarians) answered questions about how frequently they consumed meat and plant-based meals, and how frequently they perceived people in their social environment to consume (perceived descriptive norms), and approve of consuming (perceived injunctive norms) meat and plant-based meals. Perceived descriptive and injunctive norms were positively associated with participants’ frequency of meat intake: participants ate meat more frequently when they perceived their significant other to frequently eat meat (descriptive norm), and when they perceived their significant other and friends to approve of (injunctive norm) frequently eating meat. Perceived descriptive norms were positively associated, but injunctive norms were negatively associated with participants’ frequency of plant-based meal intake: participants ate plant-based meals more frequently when they perceived their extended family, friends, and significant other to frequently eat plant-based meals. However, participants ate plant-based meals more frequently when they perceived their extended family to approve of less frequent plant-based meal intake. These results suggest that different social groups may be important for meat and plant-based meal intake, with significant others and friends appearing to be important reference points for both food types. Further research examining the contexts in which the different social groups influence eating behaviour would be of value.
    • A feasibility study of a novel work-focused relational group CBT treatment programme for moderate to severe recurrent depression

      Walker, Nicola; Vernon-Smith, Madeleine; Townend, Michael; Teesside University; Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foundation Trust; University of Derby (Emerald, 2021-09-02)
      No current psychotherapeutic intervention is designed to enhance job retention in employees with moderate-severe recurrent depression. We hypothesized that interdisciplinary, work-focused psychotherapy would have the triple benefits of alleviating depression, improving interpersonal difficulties, and enhancing job retention. To test the feasibility of a new Work-focused Relational Group-CBT Treatment Programme for moderate-severe depression. The new programme was based on a theoretical integration of occupational stress, psychological, social/interpersonal, and bio-medical theories and consisted of (i) 1:1 psychotherapist sessions; (ii) a work-focused, twelve-week group CBT programme; and (iii) optional 1:1 sessions with an occupational therapist. Depression, coping/self-efficacy, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), interpersonal difficulty, and work/social functioning outcomes were assessed before and after group therapy using validated instruments. Intervention delivery, therapeutic alliance, client satisfaction, and programme cost were assessed. While there was no statistically significant change in HAM-D depression scores after therapy (n=5; p=0.313), there was a significant decrease in BDI-II depression scores after therapy (n=8; -20.0 median change, p=0.016; 6/8 responses, 7/8 minimal clinically important differences, 2 remissions). There were significant reductions in clinically relevant psychological distress, coping self-efficacy, HRQoL, and interpersonal difficulties after therapy. All clients in work at the start of therapy remained in work at the end of therapy. The intervention was safe, had 100% retention, and clients were satisfied with their treatment. The Work-focused Relational Group-CBT Treatment Programme showed promising immediate positive outcomes in terms of depressive symptoms, interpersonal difficulties, and job retention that warrant further exploration in a longer-term definitive study.
    • Circular economy: a conceptual model to measure readiness for manufacturing SMEs

      Thorley, J; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Anosike, A; University of Derby (Emerald, 2021-08-26)
      Over the last decade, circular economy (CE) has gathered interest from both industrialists and academics alike. Whilst CE research is widespread in such areas as supply chain and larger organisations, there is limited research into how small to medium enterprises (SMEs) can prepare for adopting CE. There is no comprehensive readiness model for SMEs adopting CE. The purpose of this paper is to explore the literature on change readiness and generate knowledge to fill this gap by developing a conceptual model to measure change readiness for SMEs' adopting CE. This study is based on a comprehensive literature review of change readiness models and frameworks. The paper reviews publications from Science Direct, Web of Science, Emerald, Scopus and Google Scholar. The readiness for change models and frameworks from the selected publications are evaluated and synthesised to develop a comprehensive conceptual model for change readiness for SMEs adopting a circular economy. A readiness conceptual model is developed by incorporating several factors as precursors to readiness, i.e. individual/collective difference, structural, contextual factors and related barriers. Eleven factors make up the individual/collective difference. Three factors make up the structural and contextual factors. This paper develops a conceptual model that can aid academics and practitioners in better understanding SMEs readiness to adopt CE. This paper makes a unique contribution by proposing a comprehensive conceptual model of readiness for SMEs adopting CE.
    • Impact of the Strategic Sourcing Process on the Supply Chain Response to the COVID-19 effects

      Frederico, G.F.; Kumar, V; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil; University of the West of England; University of Derby (Emerald, 2021-08-20)
      This research investigates the impact of the strategic sourcing process on the supply chain response to COVID-19. The paper presents practitioners' perspectives (experts in supply chain management, especially involved in the procurement field) on the strategic sourcing process's impact on the supply chain response. The study follows a survey-based approach for data collection. It uses a descriptive survey methodology where questions related to the impact of the strategic sourcing process on the supply chain response in the face of the coronavirus pandemic were explored by practitioners. In total, 130 valid responses were obtained. The results showed that the majority of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that strategic sourcing positively impacts the supply chain response amid the COVID-19 effects. Also, for the five phases of the strategic sourcing process, the majority of respondents considered them as a high and very high impact on the supply chain response. This paper provides timely insights for practitioners and academics, especially those involved in the supply chain management area, showing how the strategic sourcing process plays an important role in making supply chains more responsive amid disruption situations. Findings of this paper clearly shows the impact of the phases of the strategic sourcing process on the responsiveness of the supply chains amid the COVID-19 pandemic. This can encourage supply chain leadership to devote more time to strategic sourcing initiatives to generate improvements on the supply chain performance. This paper is unique since it brings an unexplored relation in respect to strategic sourcing amid disruption situations, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, from a practitioner's perspective. It also significantly contributes to developing new directions for the supply chain management domain to deal with large-scale disruptions, such as the coronavirus pandemic.
    • Career education in primary school

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Education Service Australia, 2021-07)
      This paper sets out key principles and research for career education in primary schools
    • Covid-19: The impact of the crisis on student recruitment and development

      Institute of Student Employers; AGCAS; Institute of Student Employers (Institute of Student Employers, 2020-06)
      This report presents the findings of a survey conducted by the Institute of Student Employers and AGCAS in 2020 to explore the impacts of the pandemic on student employers.
    • Covid-19: Global impacts on graduate recruitment

      Institute of Student Employers; Institute of Student Employers (Institute of Student Employers, 2020-07)
      This report sets out the findings of an Institute of Student Employers investigation into the impacts of Covid-19 on the global graduate labour market.
    • What do students want? Listening to the voices of young jobseekers

      Institute of Student Employers; Debut; Institute of Student Employers (Institute of Student Employers & Debut, 2020-09)
      This research poses a series of seven big questions asked by employers and allows over 2000 students and jobseekers to answer these questions. It is based on surveys conducted in June and July 2020 in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic. It looks at students and jobseekers experience of the jobs market and recruitment process.
    • ISE Annual Student Recruitment Survey 2018

      Institute of Student Employers; Institute of Student Employers (Institute of Student Employers, 2018)
      This paper sets out the findings of the Institute of Student Employers 2018 recruitment survey.
    • The ISE Pulse Survey 2020: Taking the temperature of the graduate labour market.

      Institute of Student Employers; Institute of Student Employers (Institute of Student Employers, 2020-02)
      This report sets out the findings of the ISE Pulse Survey 2020
    • Student development survey 2020: Supporting the learning and development of entry-level hires.

      Institute of Student Employers; Institute of Student Employers (Institute of Student Employers, 2020-03)
      This report sets out the findings of the 2020 Institute of Student Employers development survey.
    • COVID-19: Challenges for student recruitment and development

      Institute of Student Employers; Institute of Student Employers (Institute of Student Employers, 2020-04)
      Findings of the survey looking at employers practice in the recruitment and development of early career hires following the start of the Covid-19 pandemic.
    • Responding to COVID-19: The experience of suppliers

      Institute of Student Employers; Institute of Student Employers (Institute of Student Employers, 2020-05)
      Findings of the Institute of Student Employers survey of suppliers to the student employment market during the Covid-19 pandemic.
    • Pulse survey 2019

      Institute of Student Employers; Institute of Student Employers (Institute of Student Employers, 2019-02)
      Finding of the Institute of Student Employers Pulse Survey 2019
    • Student development survey 2019

      Institute of Student Employers; Institute of Student Employers (Institute of Student Employers, 2019-03)
      Findings from the Institute of Student Employers, student development survey 2019.
    • Stability, transparency, flexibility and employer ownership. Employer recommendations for improving the apprenticeship system

      Institute of Student Employers; Institute of Student Employers (Institute of Student Employers, 2019-06)
      Report from the ISE setting out current employer practice in the apprenticeship system and exploring options for the future.
    • Inside student recruitment 2019: Findings of the ISE recruitment survey

      Institute of Student Employers; Institute of Student Employers (Institute of Student Employers, 2019-09)
      Findings of the 2019 Institute of Student Employers recruitment survey.
    • Zircon geochronological and geochemical insights into pluton building and volcanic-hypabyssal-plutonic connections: Oki-Dōzen, Sea of Japan - a complex intraplate alkaline volcano

      Scarrow, Jane; Chamberlain, Katy J.; Montero, Pilar; Horstwood, Matthew S.A.; Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Tamura, Yoshihiko; Chang, Qing; Barclay, Jenni; University of Granada, Campus Fuentenueva, Granada, Spain; University of East Anglia; et al. (Mineralogical Society of America, 2021)
      The relationship between plutonic and volcanic components of magmatic plumbing systems continues to be a question of intense debate. The Oki-Dōzen Islands, Sea of Japan, preserve outcrops of temporally-associated plutonic, hypabyssal and volcanic rocks. Juxtaposition of these, by post-intrusion uplift, placed Miocene syenites in inferred faulted contact with volcanic trachytes that are cut by rhyolite hypabyssal dikes. This provides a window deep into the timing and origins of magma storage architecture and dynamics. Our aim is to determine what the age and composition of zircon, which is ubiquitous in all samples, can reveal about the plutonic-volcanic connection. Here we show magma source characteristics are recorded in zircon Hf isotopes whereas, in addition to source composition, differentiation processes - assimilation of heterogeneous hydrothermally altered crust and extensive fractional crystallization - are preserved in zircon O isotopes and trace elements, respectively. Combined with new U-Th-Pb SHRIMP zircon ages, 6.4–5.7 Ma, the compositional data show pluton formation was by protracted amalgamation of discrete magma pulses. The rhyolite dike preserves an evolved fraction segregated from these. Synchronous with plutonism was volcanic eruption of trachyte magma derived from the same source, but apparently stalled at a relatively shallow depth. Stalling occurred at least above the zone of amphibole stability since amphibole-compatible Sc and Ti were not depleted in the trachyte melt - resulting in elevated values of these in the volcanic, compared to the plutonic, zircon. Identifying smaller episodic magma pulses in a larger magmatic complex places constraints on potential magma fluxes and eruptible volumes. Distinct from high-flux, large volume, plume-related ocean islands with extensive vertically distributed multi-stage magmatic reservoirs or subduction-related transcrustal magma reservoirs, Oki-Dōzen was a low-flux system with incremental pluton growth and small- to moderate-scale eruptions.