• Lower crustal heterogeneity and fractional crystallisation control evolution of small volume magma batches at ocean island volcanoes (Ascension Island, South Atlantic)

      Chamberlain, Katy J.; Barclay, Jenni; Preece, Katie; Brown, Richard J.; Davidson, Jon P.; Durham University; University of Derby; University of East Anglia; Swansea University (Oxford University Press, 2019-08-10)
      Ocean island volcanoes erupt a wide range of magmatic compositions via a diverse range of eruptive styles. Understanding where and how these melts evolve is thus an essential component in the anticipation of future volcanic activity. Here we examine the role of crustal structure and magmatic flux in controlling the location, evolution and ultimately composition of melts at Ascension Island. Ascension Island, in the south Atlantic, is an ocean island volcano which has produced a continuum of eruptive compositions from basalt to rhyolite in its 1-million-year subaerial eruptive history. Volcanic rocks broadly follow a silica undersaturated subalkaline evolutionary trend and new data presented here show a continuous compositional trend from basalt through trachyte to rhyolite. Detailed petrographic observations are combined with in-situ geochemical analyses of crystals and glass, and new whole rock major and trace element data from mafic and felsic pyroclastic and effusive deposits that span the entire range in eruptive ages and compositions found on Ascension Island. These data show that extensive fractional crystallisation is the main driver for the production of felsic melt for Ascension Island; a volcano built on thin, young, oceanic crust. Strong spatial variations in the compositions of erupted magmas reveals the role of a heterogeneous lower crust: differing degrees of interaction with a zone of plutonic rocks are responsible for the range in mafic lava composition, and for the formation of the central and eastern felsic complexes. A central core of nested small-scale plutonic, or mush-like, bodies inhibits the ascent of mafic magmas, allowing sequential fractional crystallisation within the lower crust, and generating felsic magmas in the core of the island. There is no evidence for magma mixing preserved in any of the studied eruptions, suggesting that magma storage regions are transient, and material is not recycled between eruptions.
    • Slow on the draw: the representation of turtles, terrapins and tortoises in children’s literature

      Beaumont, Ellen S.; Briers, Erin; Harrison, Emma; University of Derby; The Orkney Campus of Heriot-Watt University, Stromness (Springer, 2019-08-08)
      Children’s picture books, both fiction and non-fiction, play a vital role in introducing the reader to the natural world. Here we examine the representation of turtles, terrapins and tortoises (Testudines) in 204 English language picture books and find a mean of 3.9 (SD 9.1) basic biological errors per book. Only 83 (40.7%) of the examined books were found to be error-free in the representation of Testudines, with no significant improvement in biological accuracy being observed over time (book publication date range 1974–2017). Suggestions are made as to how biological accuracy of children’s literature could be improved to help foster children’s understanding and wonder of the natural world. Fantasy and imagination have an important role within children’s literature, but here it is argued that the books children read should support future generations having sufficient understanding of the natural world to imagine the solutions to current environmental problems. A role of children’s picture books should not be to reinforce biological illiteracy.
    • Lean readiness within emergency departments: A conceptual framework

      Al-Najem, Mohammed; Garza-Reyes, J.A.; Antony, J.; University of Derby (Emerald, 2019-08-05)
      The purpose of this study was to develop a framework to assess the lean readiness within emergency departments (EDs) and identify the key quality practices deemed essential for lean system (LS) implementation. An extensive review of lean healthcare literature was conducted, including LS implementation within the healthcare sector (both generally and in EDs), best ED quality practices, essential factors for LS implementation within healthcare, and lean readiness assessment frameworks. The authors identified six main categories from a literature review (top management and leadership, human resources, patient relations, supplier relations, processes, and continuous improvement), and validated these based on experts’ opinion. Several factors were identified as crucial for EDs, including top management and leadership, human resources, patient relations, supplier relations, processes, and continuous improvement. The framework has not yet been tested, which prevents the author from declaring it fit for EDs. To the author’s knowledge, this is the first lean readiness assessment framework for EDs and one of the few lean readiness assessment frameworks in the literature.
    • Pellino-1 regulates immune responses to Haemophilus influenzae in models of inflammatory lung disease.

      Hughes, Bethany; Burton, Charlotte; Reese, Abigail; Jabeen, Maisha; Wright, Carl; Khoshaein, Nika; Marsh, Elizabeth; Peachell, Peter; Sun, Shao-Cong; Dockrell, David; et al. (Frontiers Media, 2019-07-31)
      Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a frequent cause of lower respiratory tract infection in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Pellino proteins are a family of E3 ubiquitin ligases that are critical regulators of TLR signalling and inflammation. The aim of this study was to identify a role for Pellino-1 in airway defence against NTHi in the context of COPD. Pellino-1 is rapidly upregulated by LPS and NTHi in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) isolated from individuals with COPD and healthy control subjects, in a TLR4 dependent manner. C57BL/6 Peli1-/- and wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to acute (single LPS challenge) or chronic (repeated LPS and elastase challenge) airway inflammation followed by NTHi infection. Both WT and Peli1-/- mice develop airway inflammation in acute and chronic airway inflammation models. Peli1-/- animals recruit significantly more neutrophils to the airway following NTHi infection which is associated with an increase in the neutrophil chemokine, KC, in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid as well as enhanced clearance of NTHi from the lung. These data suggest that therapeutic inhibition of Pellino-1 may augment immune responses in the airway and enhance bacterial clearance in individuals with COPD.
    • The eye of the beholder

      Bird, Jamie; University of Derby (Routledge, 2019-07-30)
      This chapter addresses issues that arose from being a male researcher and art therapist conducting arts-based research with women who had experienced domestic violence and abuse. Engaging in such research required that I critically engage with issues of gender within the context of conducting research. Through the lens of one particular vignette taken from a larger study, this paper will engage with broader ideas about gender and the conducting of arts-based research and art therapy. Whilst this chapter will have relevance for those men engaged in research or art therapy that involves aspects of domestic violence and abuse, it will also have relevance to those who are interested in wider discussions to be had about the influence of gender upon relationships within therapy and research. This has always been a topic worthy of sustained investigation, but the contemporary emergence within public discourse about abuses of male privilege within various professions make this an especially important subject to attend to. Drawing upon the work of Sandra Harding (1998, 2004), Jeff Hearn (1998) and Ann Murphy (2012), I will explore how feminist standpoint theory and reflexivity helped to manage, and make sense of, the concerns and anxieties that arose whilst conducting research into violence against women. Anxieties about research becoming therapy merged with anxieties about being a male researcher working with women who had experienced domestic violence and abuse. Whilst this chapter does not aim to outline in depth what an arts-based research methodology looks like within the context of studying domestic violence and abuse, it begins by describing the methodology in enough detail to provide a context within which the nature of the research process can be appreciated. The findings of the research are presented in sufficient detail to allow the overall findings of the research to be understood. There then follows examples of words and images produced by one woman, who used her participation as a way of ensuring that she was seen clearly by myself and by other research participants. This aspect of wanting to be seen became an embodiment of the need to acknowledge my own standpoint and reflexive position as a male researcher. Evaluative comments about participation made by other women are used to show how vulnerability was a feature of taking part in this research for both participants and for me. The concept of vulnerability is examined with reference made to ideas about imagination and empathy from the perspective of feminist philosophy, which in turn helps to shape a discussion about the place of gender within research, art therapy, and the boundary between them. In keeping with the principles of feminist standpoint theory and strong objectivity, as set forth by Harding (1998), this chapter is written from a first-person perspective.
    • An international validation of a clinical tool to assess carers’ quality of life in Huntington’s Disease.

      Aubeeluck, Aimee; Stupple, Edward J. N.; Schofield, Malcolm B.; Hughes, Alis C.; van der Meer, Lucienne; Landwehrmeyer, Bernhard; Ho, Aileen K.; University of Derby; University of Nottingham; Leiden University Medical Centre; et al. (Frontiers, 2019-07-23)
      Family carers of individuals living with Huntington’s disease (HD) manage a distinct and unique series of difficulties arising from the complex nature of HD. This paper presents the validation of the definitive measure of quality of life (QoL) for this group. The Huntington’s Disease Quality of Life Battery for Carers (HDQoL-C) was expanded (n = 47) and then administered to an international sample of 1716 partners and family carers from 13 countries. In terms of the psychometric properties of the tool, exploratory analysis of half of the sample demonstrated good internal consistency and reliability. Some items on the full version did not meet psychometric thresholds and a short version (HDQoL-Cs) (n = 23) was developed based on more stringent criteria. This was achieved using standard psychometric item reduction techniques to both increase reliability and reduce the burden of carers completing the scale. Confirmatory factor analysis of the model structure showed a good fit for all factors and indicated that the HDQoL-C and HDQoL-Cs are psychometrically robust measures of QoL. We found that carers who lived with and looked after their spouse/partner had reduced sense of coping, hope for the future, and overall QoL. Carers with children who were at risk carried the gene or were symptomatic also had poorer QoL outcomes. Findings indicated the HDQoL-C and HDQoL-Cs are valid in multiple languages and across varied cultures as measures of self-reported QoL in family carers of individual’s living with HD. These psychometrically validated tools can aid and guide the implementation of therapeutic interventions to improve life quality in this population and research into international and cross-cultural carer experiences. The HDQoL-Cs is recommended as the definitive international measure of HD carer QoL.
    • Urban meadows as an alternative to short mown grassland: effects of composition and height on biodiversity

      Norton, Briony, A.; Bending, Gary, D.; Clark, Rachel; Corstanje, Ron; Dunnett, Nigel; Evans, Karl, L.; Grafius, Darren, R.; Gravestock, Emily; Grice, Samuel, M.; Harris, Jim, A.; et al. (Ecological Society of America, 2019-07-22)
      There are increasing calls to provide greenspace in urban areas, yet the ecological quality, as well as quantity, of greenspace is important. Short mown grassland designed for recreational use is the dominant form of urban greenspace in temperate regions but requires considerable maintenance and typically provides limited habitat value for most taxa. Alternatives are increasingly proposed, but the biodiversity potential of these is not well understood. In a replicated experiment across six public urban greenspaces, we used nine different perennial meadow plantings to quantify the relative roles of floristic diversity and height of sown meadows on the richness and composition of three taxonomic groups: plants, invertebrates, and soil microbes. We found that all meadow treatments were colonized by plant species not sown in the plots, suggesting that establishing sown meadows does not preclude further locally determined grassland development if management is appropriate. Colonizing species were rarer in taller and more diverse plots, indicating competition may limit invasion rates. Urban meadow treatments contained invertebrate and microbial communities that differed from mown grassland. Invertebrate taxa responded to changes in both height and richness of meadow vegetation, but most orders were more abundant where vegetation height was longer than mown grassland. Order richness also increased in longer vegetation and Coleoptera family richness increased with plant diversity in summer. Microbial community composition seems sensitive to plant species composition at the soil surface (0–10 cm), but in deeper soils (11–20 cm) community variation was most responsive to plant height, with bacteria and fungi responding differently. In addition to improving local residents’ site satisfaction, native perennial meadow plantings can produce biologically diverse grasslands that support richer and more abundant invertebrate communities, and restructured plant, invertebrate, and soil microbial communities compared with short mown grassland. Our results suggest that diversification of urban greenspace by planting urban meadows in place of some mown amenity grassland is likely to generate substantial biodiversity benefits, with a mosaic of meadow types likely to maximize such benefits.
    • Singing as an adjunct therapy for children and adults with cystic fibrosis.

      Irons, J. Yoon; Petocz, Peter; Kenny, Dianna T; Chang, Ann B.; University of Derby (2019-07-12)
      Cystic fibrosis is a genetically inherited, life‐threatening condition that affects major organs. The management of cystic fibrosis involves a multi‐faceted daily treatment regimen that includes airway clearance techniques, pancreatic enzymes and other medications. Previous studies have found that compliance with this intensive treatment is poor, especially among adolescents. Because of both the nature and consequences of the illness and the relentless demands of the treatment, many individuals with cystic fibrosis have a poor quality of life. Anecdotal reports suggest that singing may provide both appropriate exercise for the whole respiratory system and a means of emotional expression which may enhance quality of life. This is an update of a previously published review. To evaluate the effects of singing as an adjunct therapy to standard treatment on the quality of life, morbidity, respiratory muscle strength and pulmonary function of children and adults with cystic fibrosis. We searched the Group's Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Date of latest search: 07 January 2019. We also searched major allied complementary data bases, and clinical trial registers. Additionally, we hand searched relevant conference proceedings and journals. Date of latest search: 28 March 2019. Randomised controlled trials in which singing (as an adjunct intervention) is compared with either a control intervention (for example, playing computer games or doing craft activities) or no singing in people with cystic fibrosis. Results of searches were reviewed against pre‐determined criteria for inclusion. Only one eligible trial was available for analysis. Since only one small study (n = 40) was included, no meta‐analysis could be performed. The included randomised controlled study was of parallel design and undertaken at two paediatric hospitals in Australia. The study evaluated the effects of a singing program on the quality of life and respiratory muscle strength of hospitalised children with cystic fibrosis (mean age 11.6 years, 35% male). While the singing group received eight individual singing sessions, the control group participated in preferred recreational activities, such as playing computer games or watching movies. This study was limited by a small sample size (51 participants) and a high drop‐out rate (21%). There were no differences between the groups at either post‐intervention or follow‐up; although by the end of treatment there were some improvements in some of the domains of the quality of life questionnaire Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire‐Revised (e.g. emotional, social and vitality domains) for both singing and control groups. For the respiratory muscle strength indices, maximal expiratory pressure at follow‐up (six to eight weeks post‐intervention) was higher in the singing group, mean difference 25.80 (95% confidence interval 5.94 to 45.66). There was no difference between groups for any of the other respiratory function parameters (maximal inspiratory pressure, spirometry) at either post‐intervention or follow‐up. No adverse effects were observed in the singing group; adverse events for the control group were not reported in the paper. There is insufficient evidence to determine the effects of singing on quality of life or on the respiratory parameters in people with cystic fibrosis. However, there is growing interest in non‐medical treatments for cystic fibrosis and researchers may wish to investigate the impact of this inexpensive therapy on respiratory function and psychosocial well‐being further in the future.
    • An agenda for best practice research on group singing, health, and well-being

      Dingle, Genevieve A.; Clift, Stephen; Finn, Saoirse; Gilbert, Rebekah; Groarke, Jenny M; Irons, J. Yoon; Jones-Bartoli, Alice; Lamont, Alexandra; Launay, Jacques; Martin, Eleanor S; et al. (Sage, 2019-07-10)
      Research on choirs and other forms of group singing has been conducted for several decades and there has been a recent focus on the potential health and wellbeing benefits, particularly in amateur singers. Experimental, quantitative and qualitative studies show evidence of a range of biopsychosocial and wellbeing benefits to singers; however, there are many challenges to rigour and replicability. To support the advances of research into group singing, the authors met and discussed theoretical and methodological issues to be addressed in future studies. The authors are from five countries and represent the following disciplinary perspectives: music psychology, music therapy, community music, clinical psychology, educational and developmental psychology, evolutionary psychology, health psychology, social psychology, and public health. This paper summarises our collective thoughts in relation to the priority questions for future group singing research, theoretical frameworks, potential solutions for design and ethical challenges, quantitative measures, qualitative methods, and whether there is scope for a benchmarking set of measures across singing projects. With eight key recommendations, the paper sets an agenda for best practice research on group singing.
    • Evaluating clinical placements in Saudi Arabia with the CLES+T scale

      Anthony, Denis; Al-Anazi, Norah; Alosaimi, Dalyal; Pandaan, Isabelita; Dyson, Sue; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2019-07-09)
      The clinical learning environment and supervision (CLES) tool has been enhanced with an additional sub-scale for measuring the quality of nurse teacher’s involvement to form the CLES+T scale. It has been widely used in many countries to evaluate clinical placements. Here we report data from Saudi Arabia. The CLES+T was employed to measure satisfaction among student nurses concerning their clinical learning environment. Linear regression was used to determine relationships of various variables to the outcomes of total CLES+T score and those of its subscales. Students were generally satisfied with their placements. For female students the number of visits of the nurse tutor was positively associated with most subscales and with the total score. For males, who had fewer visits of nurse tutor, there was no such association. Nurse tutor visits are positive in terms of clinical placement evaluation by female student nurses. Saudi nursing students are generally similar to students in other international studies in terms of their appraisal of clinical placements.
    • ‘A definite feel-it moment’: Embodiment, externalization and emotion during chair-work in compassion-focused therapy

      Bell, Tobyn; Montague, Jane; Elander, James; Gilbert, Paul; University of Derby (Wiley, 2019-07-08)
      Chair-work is an experiential method used within compassion-focused therapy (CFT) to apply compassion to various aspects of the self. This is the first study of CFT chair-work and is focused on clients’ lived experiences of a chair-work intervention for self-criticism. Twelve participants with depression were interviewed following the chair-work intervention and the resulting data was examined using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). Three superordinate themes were identified: ‘embodiment and enactment’, ‘externalizing the self in physical form’ and ‘emotional intensity’. The findings suggest the importance of accessing and expressing various emotions connected with self-criticism, whilst highlighting the potential for client distress and avoidance during the intervention. The role of embodying, enacting and physically situating aspects of the self in different chairs is also suggested to be an important mechanism of change in CFT chair-work. The findings are discussed in terms of clinical implications, emphasizing how core CFT concepts and practices are facilitated by the chair-work process.
    • Opening doors to nature: Bringing calm and raising aspirations of vulnerable young people through nature-based intervention

      Hallam, Jenny; Richardson, Miles; Richardson, Elizabeth; Ferguson, Fiona; University of Derby (American Psychological Association, 2019-07-08)
      This qualitative study explores the experiences of YMCA residents who participated in a nature-based intervention designed to support wellbeing run by Derbyshire Wildlife Trust and YMCA Derbyshire. The intervention ran over 9 weeks and involved taking groups of residents off site for a range of outdoor activities from allotment gardening to nature conservation in various outdoor environments.  After the intervention took place semi-structured interviews, which explored the personal journeys of 8 residents who had participated in the intervention, were conducted. An IPA analysis of the interviews identified three superordinate themes: building social relationships, developing skills and developing feelings of self-worth and managing emotions through nature. It is argued that the intervention enabled the residents to feel part of a supportive community which enabled a positive shift in identity. Furthermore, the programme helped residents manage their emotions, supporting their mental health and promoting a general sense of wellbeing. This is especially important, given that members of the intervention have a history of mental health issues and often come from a background of higher socio-economic deprivation, where opportunities for social cohesion and nature connectedness are scarce. 
    • Experiences of enhanced recovery after surgery in general gynaecology patients: An interpretative phenomenological analysis.

      Phillips, Elly; Archer, Stephanie; Montague, Jane; Bali, Anish; University of Derby (Sage, 2019-07-03)
      There is little qualitative research exploring non-cancer gynaecology patients’ experiences of enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocols. Seven women participated in audio-recorded interviews, discussing their experiences of enhanced recovery after surgery for gynaecological surgery. Data were transcribed and analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Three themes were identified: meeting informational needs, taking control of pain, and mobilising when feeling fragile. Control emerged as a key element throughout the themes and was supported by provision of factual information. While participants were generally satisfied with their experience, topics such as concerns about analgesic use, the informal role of staff in mobilisation, and the expressed desire for more experiential information for participants require further research.
    • Organizational learning paths based upon Industry 4.0 adoption: An empirical study with Brazilian manufacturers

      Tortorella, Jose Arturo G.L., Cawley Vergara, A.M., Garza-Reyes, J.A., Sawhney, R.; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2019-07-03)
      This article aims at examining the mediating role played by Organizational Learning (OL) capabilities at different contextualization levels on the association between Industry 4.0 (I4.0) technologies and operational performance. For that, we gathered information from 135 firms that have initiated their digital transformation towards the fourth industrial revolution era. Data was analyzed by means of multivariate data techniques. Our results show that learning capabilities at an organization level positively mediate the impact of I4.0 for achieving higher operational performance levels. However, OL at a team and individual level may not present a significant effect on such mediation. As I4.0 is claimed to facilitate a faster and more efficient identification and solution of manufacturing problems, our research provides empirical evidence to indicate that companies that systematically foster learning and knowledge sharing at an organization level can obtain greater benefits from I4.0 technologies adoption.
    • Use of clean technologies in agribusiness in Mexico: A literature review

      Rocha-Lona, Jose Arturo L., Cuevas-Zuñiga, I.Y., Soto-Flores, M.R., Garza-Reyes, J.A., Kumar, V.; University of Derby (IEOM Society, 2019-07)
      There is little research documenting the use of clean technologies (CT) in Agribusiness in Mexico. In this regard, the objective of this article is to provide an in-depth literature review that can cover this gap and help decision-makers and investors to identify opportunity areas in the industry. It also provides a good theoretical background for researchers and practitioners to further investigate applications of clean technologies in this sector or other potential ones. To conduct this research, an in-depth analysis of the literature on clean technologies and their use by agribusiness in Mexico was carried out. The databases such as Web of Science, Scopus, and Springer were used to identify the relevant international journals in the field and their research-contributions. The main results show that there is a need for financial investments on clean technologies CT that can help optimizing processes and products on the sector. The results also showed that CT is mainly used to minimize energy consumption, to optimize planting and harvesting, to enhance irrigation and water use, and to maintain the soil fertility. Despite these wide applications, the authors found that the penetration of CT is still low and policy-strategies are required with effective financial investments in the sector.
    • The impact of learning orientation on innovation performance: mediating role of operations strategy and moderating role of environmental uncertainty

      Jeihoony, P., Jabarzadeh, Y., Kumar, V., Garza-Reyes, J.A.; University of Derby (IEOM Society, 2019-07)
      Performing well in developing production industry is an important factor for companies to survive and sustain a competitive edge in the current turbulent business environment. The purpose of this study is to explore the effect of learning orientation on innovation performance with the mediating role of operations strategy (cost, quality, flexibility, and delivery). Environmental uncertainty plays a moderator role in this model. Using a questionnaire to measure variables, data were collected from 243 UK production companies. Structural Equations Modelling used for data analysis and hypothesis testing. The results support 9 out of thirteen research hypotheses. Learning orientation influences innovation performance and two dimensions of operations strategy (delivery and quality) mediates this relationship. Also, environmental uncertainty positively moderates the relationship between quality and flexibility strategies with innovation performance.
    • Towards sustainable industrial development - a systems thinking-based approach

      Mendoza-del Villar. L.A., Oliva-López, E., Luis-Pineda, O., Garza-Reyes, J.A.; University of Derby (IEOM Society, 2019-07)
      Various critical global issues, including global warming and poverty, have been recognized and identified by the United Nations (UN) as drivers for unsustainability. Consequently, the UN established the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) with the aim of seeking universal peace and larger freedom by balancing the three dimensions of sustainable development, i.e. economic, social and environmental. A particular attention SDGs pay is in eradicating poverty as this is considered one of the greatest global challenges. Poverty is not only an economic matter as it also has an impact on the social and environmental dimensions. A strategy to tackle poverty is to foster industry development. However, a holistic point of view is necessary by also considering stakeholders otherwise, it becomes a neoliberal solution. Despite the fact that some research has been conducted, e.g. case studies and surveys of sustainable practices, there is a lack of industrial sustainable development as a framework to tackle sustainability issues. Thus, this paper proposes a framework for industrial sustainable development under a socially inclusive approach within the context of the Mexican manufacturing industry. The framework proposal is based on a state-of-the-art literature review conducted in the Web of Science and Scopus databases.
    • Transport operations optimisation through lean implementation – a case study

      Deesrisak, Jose Arturo N., Garza-Reyes, J.A., Nadeem, S.P., Kumar, A., Kumar, V., Gonzalez-Aleu, F., Vil-larreal, B.; University of Derby (IEOM Society, 2019-07)
      Lean has benefited industries, however, the research regarding its implementation in the transportation sector is limited. Therefore, there is huge potential for the implementation of Lean in the transportation sector. With the growing population and production, traffic congestion is no surprise, placing constraints on transport operations. This research utilises two extensions of the Lean tools of Transportation Value Stream Mapping (TVSM) and Transportation Overall Vehicle Effectiveness (TOVE). This research presents a case study of company XYZ based in Thailand, to optimise their transport operations through utilisation of Lean and its extensions mentioned earlier. As a result, the TOVE index is projected to improve from 17% to 31% and TVSM from 51% – 70%. The empirical study presented in this research paves the way for further research and adoption of Lean in transportation operations.
    • Leadership and ministry, lay and ordained: Insights from rural multi-church groups

      Weller, Paul; Artess, Jane; Sahar, Arif; Neary, Siobhan; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS); University of Derby (University of Derby, 2019-07)
      This report examines and explores leadership challenges and opportunities in the setting of Christian ministry and witness within the rural multi-church context. The challenges arise from a combination of demographic and socio-economic challenges coupled with inherited building, operational structures and patterns of ordained ministry. It utilises in-depth literature review, semi-structured interviews and a mapping of training provision to establish the challenges and opportunities for rural multi-church contexts. A lack of confidence was identified as the biggest barrier in encouraging clergy and lay people to look at ministry and witness new ways to engage in learning and development opportunities. It is recognised that a one-size-fits all approach is not appropriate but consideration needs to be given to the extension of formal training courses at local level, short modular approaches and the informal approaches such as mentoring.
    • Exploring the reliability and validity of the Huntington’s Disease quality of life battery for carers (HDQoL-C) within a Polish population

      Aubeeluck, Aimee; Stupple, Edward; Bartoszek, A; Kocka, K; Ślusarska, B; Stupple, Edward J. N.; University of Derby (MDPI, 2019-06-30)
      Huntington’s disease (HD) is a rare genetic neurodegenerative disorder that causes motor disorders, neuropsychiatric symptoms and a progressing deterioration of cognitive functions. Complex issues resulting from the hereditary nature of HD, the complexity of symptoms and the concealed onset of the disease have a great impact on the quality of life of family carers. The caregivers are called the “forgotten people” in HD, especially with relation to genetic counseling. This study aims to explore the reliability and validity of the Huntington’s Disease Quality of Life Battery for carers (HDQoL-C) within a Polish population. A total of 90 carers recruited from the Enroll-HD study in Polish research centers of the European Huntington’s Disease Network completed a polish translation of the HDQoL-C. Data were subjected to Principle Components Analysis (PCA) and reliability measures. The Polish version of the shortened versions of the HDQoL-C is similarly valid compared to the original English version and suitable for use within this population. The HDQoL-C has previously demonstrated a wide range of benefits for practitioners in capturing and understanding carer experience and these benefits can now be extended to Polish speaking populations.