• Benchmarking of sustainability to assess practices and performances of the management of the end of life cycle of electronic products: a study of Brazilian manufacturing companies

      Gonçalves da Costa, L., Espíndola Ferreira, J.C., Kumar, V., Garza-Reyes, J.A.; Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil; University of the West of England; University of Derby (Springer, 2020-09-22)
      The relentless pursuit of lower production costs causes companies to invest in more efficient production systems so that they can remain economically competitive, while the actions focusing on more sustainable operations from an environmental point of view are usually performed to meet the political government regulating environmental control. However, it is common for companies to focus their efforts to minimize the environmental impacts at an early stage of the product life cycle, neglecting sustainability management in the post-use phase. Given the context, this study seeks to develop sustainability indicators that can be used by the electronics industry to assess the level of practice and performance during production that are related to product recovery after the use phase, in order to better understand how companies are acting to reduce the environmental impacts of their products at the end of their life cycle. Initially, critical success factors related to environmental management of the product’s end-of-life are obtained. Then, some of those critical success factors are prioritized, giving rise to the indicators of sustainability used in the benchmarking method. Benchmarking was performed in electronics Brazilian companies, and the data was obtained by means of a questionnaire and interviews. It is concluded from the results that the proposed indicators are suitable for measuring the levels of practices and performance of the participant companies in environmental management at the end of the product life cycle as the indicators were able to portray faithfully the reality of each company.
    • Beneficial long-term antidiabetic actions of N- and C-terminally modified analogues of apelin-13 in diet-induced obese diabetic mice

      Parthsarathy, Vadivel; Hogg, Christopher; Flatt, Peter R.; O'Harte, Finbarr P. M.; University of Ulster; School of Biomedical Sciences, SAAD Centre for Pharmacy and Diabetes; University of Ulster; Coleraine Northern Ireland, UK; School of Biomedical Sciences, SAAD Centre for Pharmacy and Diabetes; University of Ulster; Coleraine Northern Ireland, UK; School of Biomedical Sciences, SAAD Centre for Pharmacy and Diabetes; University of Ulster; Coleraine Northern Ireland, UK; School of Biomedical Sciences, SAAD Centre for Pharmacy and Diabetes; University of Ulster; Coleraine Northern Ireland, UK (Wiley, 2017-07-20)
      To investigate the chronic effects of twice-daily administration of stable apelin analogues, apelin-13 amide and pyroglutamyl (pGlu) apelin-13 amide, on metabolic variables in glucose-intolerant and insulin-resistant diet-induced obese mice fed a high-fat diet for 150 days. Groups of mice received twice-daily (9 am and 5 pm) injections of saline vehicle, apelin-13 amide, (pGlu)apelin-13 amide or exendin-4(1-39) for 28 days (all at 25 nmol/kg). Energy intake, body weight, non-fasting blood glucose, plasma insulin, glucose tolerance, metabolic response to feeding and insulin sensitivity, together with pancreatic hormone content and biochemical variables such as lipids and total GLP-1 were monitored. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry analysis and indirect calorimetry were also performed. Administration of apelin-13 amide, (pGlu)apelin-13 amide or exendin-4 significantly decreased body weight, food intake and blood glucose and increased plasma insulin compared with high-fat-fed saline-treated controls (P < .05 and P < .001), Additionally, all peptide-treated groups exhibited improved glucose tolerance (oral and intraperitoneal), metabolic responses to feeding and associated insulin secretion. (pGlu)apelin-13 amide also significantly improved glycated haemoglobin and insulin sensitivity after 28 days. Both (pGlu)apelin-13 amide and exendin-4 increased bone mineral content and decreased respiratory exchange ratio, whereas only (pGlu)apelin-13 amide increased energy expenditure. All treatment groups displayed reduced circulating triglycerides and increased glucagon-like peptide-1 concentrations, although only (pGlu)apelin-13 amide significantly reduced LDL cholesterol and total body fat, and increased pancreatic insulin content. These data indicate the therapeutic potential of stable apelin-13 analogues, with effects equivalent to or better than those of exendin-4.
    • Beneficial long-term antidiabetic actions of N- and C-terminally modified analogues of apelin-13 in diet-induced obese diabetic mice.

      Parthsarathy, Vadivel; Hogg, Christopher; Flatt, Peter R.; O'Harte, Finbarr P. M. (Wiley, 2017-07-20)
      AimsThis study investigated the chronic effects of twice daily administration of stable apelin analogues, apelin-13 amide and (pGlu)apelin-13 amide, on metabolic parameters in glucose intolerant and insulin resistant diet-induced obese (DIO) mice fed a high-fat diet for 150 days.Study Design & MethodsGroups of mice received twice daily (09:00 and 17:00 h) injections of saline vehicle, apelin-13 amide, (pGlu)apelin-13 amide or exendin-4(1–39) for 28 days (all at 25 nmol/kg). Energy intake, body weight, non-fasting blood glucose, plasma insulin, glucose tolerance, metabolic response to feeding and insulin sensitivity together with pancreatic hormone content and biochemical parameters such as lipids and total GLP-1 were monitored. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) analysis and indirect calorimetry were also performed.ResultsAdministration of apelin-13 amide, (pGlu)apelin-13 amide or exendin-4 significantly decreased bodyweight, food intake, blood glucose and increased plasma insulin compared with high-fat fed saline treated controls (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001), Additionally, all peptide treated groups exhibited improved glucose tolerance (oral and ip), metabolic responses to feeding and associated insulin secretion. (pGlu)apelin-13 amide also significantly improved HbA1c and insulin sensitivity after 28 days. Both (pGlu)apelin-13 amide and exendin-4 increased bone mineral content and decreased respiratory exchange ratio (RER), whereas only (pGlu)apelin-13 amide increased energy expenditure. All treatment groups displayed reduced circulating triglycerides and increased GLP-1 concentrations, although only (pGlu)apelin-13 amide significantly reduced LDL-cholesterol, total body fat, and increased pancreatic insulin content.ConclusionThese data indicate the therapeutic potential of stable apelin-13 analogues with effects equivalent to or better than exendin-4.
    • The benefits of an arts education

      Mcgravie, David; University of Derby (University of Derby, 06/12/2017)
      Latest reports suggest the creative industries are under pressure and question whether they can provide a useful education to young people. David McGravie, Head of the School of Arts at the University of Derby explains why an arts education is important and how it can benefit students
    • Best supply chain management practices and high- performance firms: the case of Gulf manufacturing firms.

      AL-Shboul, Moh’d Anwer; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Kumar, Vikas; University of Derby; German-Jordanian University; University of West of England (Emerald, 2018-10)
      Purpose – The study aims to investigate the best supply chain management practices that are implemented in medium and large-sized Gulf manufacturing firms. Design/methodology/approach – This study has explored seven supply chain management practices, i.e. supplier collaboration, flexibility with partners, usage of Internet, customer focus, lean production, Internal integration, and quality management. It assumes that the best performing firms must be the ones implementing the best practices. T-test and multiple linear regression analyses were used to establish the best practices, implemented by medium and large-sized Gulf manufacturing firms. Findings – The results showed that quality management, customer focus, and supplier collaboration are considered as best supply chain management practices in Gulf manufacturing firms. Usage of internet may have been the best practice previously, but not anymore. Lean production cannot yet be qualified as, but may develop into the best supply chain management practice. Practical Implications – The study provides a useful contribution to the field of best supply chain management practices as it provides better decision-making insights and a benchmarking base to top managers, policy makers, and academics. It is likely to result in increased overall performance of their firms. Originality/value – The study provides an understanding of the distinctive characteristics of the best supply chain management practices, implemented by Gulf manufacturing firms. It has broader implications for all manufacturing firms, particularly in developing economies where the growth of manufacturing and effective management of their supply chains is a key element for the economic development.
    • Between excess and subtraction: Scenographic violence in Howard Barker’s Found in the Ground

      Kipp, Lara Maleen; University of Derby (Centre de recherche VALE, 23/06/2017)
      The article examines the violence produced by the scenography of Howard Barker's Found in the Ground, which emerges out of the play’s formal experimentation. Thematically, the play is rife with violence, such as former Nuremberg judge Toonelhuis’ consumption of the remains of high-ranking Nazis he sentenced to death, the continuous burning of books and the retelling of various murders by the war criminal Knox. Found in the Ground re-visions the collective European memory of the Holocaust; this thematic violence is expanded and subverted by scenographic means, radically reimagining the historical context. The particularity of the spatio-temporal, audio-visual rendering of violence in Barker’s text is the focus of this article. The article relates the play to Artaud’s conception of cruelty and to Lyotard’s thinking on the sublime. It contextualises the play through Barker’s theoretical writings, Lingis’ notion of catastrophic time (2000) and Aronson’s proposition of the stage as an abyss (2005).
    • Between possibilities and places: cognitive metaphor, creativity, art and education

      Brown, Michael; Wilson, Chris; University of Derby (KIE, 2013-09-10)
    • Beyond batched taxidermy

      Baker, Steve; University of Derby (David Winton Bell Gallery, 2015-01-23)
    • Beyond botched taxidermy

      Baker, Steve; University of Derby (2016)
    • Beyond brexit

      Hooley, Tristram; Institute of Student Employers (Institute of Student Employers, 2019-04)
      The original Brexit timetable has fallen by the wayside. Given how the process to exit the EU has gone so far, this seems unlikely to be the final twist in the story. We are at the end of the beginning of Brexit rather than the beginning of the end. Negotiations about Britain’s future relationship with Europe will go on for years, possibly decades. And that is saying nothing of the way in which Britain’s own politics, policy and law might develop once it is untethered by EU regulation. The question for members of the ISE will be how this may make a difference to the way in which student recruitment and development works.
    • 'Beyond Jack and Jill': designing for individuals using HADRIAN

      Porter, J. Mark; Case, Keith; Marshall, Russell; Gyi, Diane E.; Sims, Ruth; Loughborough University (Elsevier, 2004)
      In order to support the practice of ‘design for all’within the design community two key areas have been identified that are critical to success. The first is the provision of accurate and relevant data on the target users, in this case people of all shapes, sizes, ages and abilities. The second is the efficient and effective support in the use of these data during concept generation and product development. A database of individual people was created including their 3D anthropometry and functional abilities. Data sets for individuals are kept intact, a radical departure from the traditional approach which involves effectively ‘dismembering’people to create tables of percentiles for every dimension of interest. This database is accessed by HADRIAN, our CAD-based design tool, which is integrated with the SAMMIE CAD human modelling system. Using this system, proposed designs of products or services can be automatically evaluated for each individual in the database, based upon criteria set by the designer (e.g. access, reach, vision, mobility and strength). The tool can identify which individuals will be ‘designed in’or ‘designed out’and can support the designer in modifying the proposed design to achieve a greater percentage of people accommodated.
    • Beyond knowing nature: Contact, emotion, compassion, meaning, and beauty are pathways to nature connection

      Lumber, Ryan; Richardson, Miles; Sheffield, David; DeMontfort University; University of Derby (Public Library of Science (PLOS), 2017-05-09)
      Feeling connected to nature has been shown to be beneficial to wellbeing and pro-environmental behaviour. General nature contact and knowledge based activities are often used in an attempt to engage people with nature. However the specific routes to nature connectedness have not been examined systematically. Two online surveys (total n = 321) of engagement with, and value of, nature activities structured around the nine values of the Biophila Hypothesis were conducted. Contact, emotion, meaning, and compassion, with the latter mediated by engagement with natural beauty, were predictors of connection with nature, yet knowledge based activities were not. In a third study (n = 72), a walking intervention with activities operationalising the identified predictors, was found to significantly increase connection to nature when compared to walking in nature alone or walking in and engaging with the built environment. The findings indicate that contact, emotion, meaning, compassion, and beauty are pathways for improving nature connectedness. The pathways also provide alternative values and frames to the traditional knowledge and identification routes often used by organisations when engaging the public with nature.
    • Beyond restoration: considering emotion regulation in natural well-being

      Richardson, Miles; University of Derby (Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers, 2019-04-22)
      Our relationship with the rest of the natural world can help emotional regulation, yet the role of nature in the regulation of emotions is often overlooked. As the health benefits provided by nature are increasingly recognised there is a need for accessible models that can explain and promote those well-being benefits. To complement existing theories based on restoration and to improve understanding of nature’s role in emotional regulation, this article provides an account of the well-being benefits of nature based on affect regulation. The article considers the relationships between emotional regulation, well-being and nature through an accessible model of affect regulation that explains research reporting physiological responses to nature. The model, and underpinning research, highlight the interconnectedness between people and the rest of nature, fitting a wider narrative about the human role in our ecosystem. Applied implications of this perspective are presented.
    • Beyond theoretical: integrating a live project brief into an interior design module

      Jones, Rhiannon; Slabbert, Barend; McMahon, Daithi; Di Monte-Milner, Giovanna; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2021-07-20)
    • BFMAF – Border Crossing

      Davies, Huw; Iredale, Melanie; University of Derby (Arts Council England, 2014-09)
      The 10th edition of the Berwick Film and Media Arts Festival (BFMAF) ‘Border Crossing’ (September 2014) explored border identities and the crossing and transcending of global boundaries against the background of the 2014 Scottish Independence Referendum. The research contribution of Davies relates to the curation of the Artists’ Trail / Installations; a promenade exhibition of artists’ film and video contextualised by publication which links together a number of different site-specific architectural locations within the Elizabethan Ramparts. The 2014 edition featured the work of 47 artists and filmmakers from 17 different countries and included 16 UK premiers and 6 specifically commissioned works. The commissions (selected from an international call) provide the opportunity for the creation of original new works as a response to the Festival theme and environmental location. The audience attendance was 9450.
    • BFMAF – Fact or Fiction

      Davies, Huw; Taylor, Peter; University of Derby (Berwick Film & Media Arts Festival, 2015-09)
      The 11th edition of the Berwick Film and Media Arts Festival (BFMAF), ‘Fact or Fiction’ (September 2015) questioned the ambiguous relationships between fact and fantasy, documentary and narrative and reality and myth. The research contribution of Davies relates to the curation of the Artists’ Trail / Installations; a promenade exhibition of artists’ film and video contextualised by publication which links together a number of different site-specific architectural locations within the Elizabethan Ramparts. The 2015 edition featured the work of 40 artists and filmmakers from 20 different countries and included 12 UK premiers and 4 specifically commissioned works. The commissions (selected from an international call) provide the opportunity for the creation of original new works as a response to the Festival theme and environmental location. The audience attendance was 8910
    • The big picture

      Wilson, Colin; University of Derby (2014-01)
      To look at the Big Picture is an act of becoming involved, emotionally, physically and intellectually. To see the Big Picture is to see the complexity of relationships in everyday lived experience. In a world of small-minded, superficial, self-interested individuals, where images become noise, and noise becomes entertainment and distraction, where the shallowness of life coincides with the shallowness of understanding, experience and expectation. The Big Picture proposes a world of depth, a time for reflection a place for change. Alongside the Big Picture are the Big Questions
    • Bio-colours sustainable colour: Material, colour and patterning, choice for textiles that can have a positive impact on our well-being.

      Wells, Kate; Greger, Ness; University of Derby (2018-05-29)
      Bio-Colours Sustainable Colour: Material, Colour and Patterning Choice for Textiles that can have a Positive Impact on our Well-Being. The aim of this paper is to address the question: Can the textiles with which we surround ourselves improve our health and well-being while contributing to lessening the environmental impact of their production? Both design practice and theoretical research informed this paper by researching into the anti-bacterial properties of natural dyes while considering the methods of application of Bio-colours and their extracts to fabrics as a future sustainable colouring and patterning medium. The main objective of this paper is to bring together several aspects of the author’s research: That of the potential healing properties of natural dyes alongside practical experimentation into eco-patterning: A sustainable method for the colouring of materials via shibori and hand processes along side the use of light (differing wavelengths) as a potential method of aesthetic decoration, that is underpinned by the desire to design fabrics that are ethically and sustainably viable. Instigated by the output of collaborative research between two different disciplines: That of textile design and early coloration methods with historical photographic imaging techniques. The research initially considered the symbiotic relationships between natural plant extracts with ‘Anthotypes’, a very early form of photography c1840 and considered the success and failure of natural dye extracts to create images under different application techniques and light exposure sources. The aim of which, was to understand the success or failure of this type of patterning process on textiles and consider the question: Could this kind of photographic image making be applied as a future, sustainable method of design generation, colouration and patterning of fabric? The objective was in creating an alternative sustainable surface design process that relies upon light and natural colouring substances/dyes as the main patterning and processing medium. By embracing the ethos of ‘slow textiles’ as an alternative to ‘fast fashion’, the research considered the impact natural and synthetic dyes, fibres and the textile coloration industry have as a whole on the environment and well being of the world’s population. Practical design research investigations explored the potential for improving the welfare of the user through considered selection of the colouring matter, natural dye extracts; fibre bases such as hemp, ramie, bamboo, milk and soya alongside solar eco-patterning techniques with an overall aim of producing a patterned material that has sustainable and ethical credentials. Although some very successful outputs were achieved: The main disadvantage of this technique being sustainable being that the fugitive colorant that provides the photographic image/design continues to fade with light and time. New investigations lead to an improvement in fastness once a design has been created, with developments in application of the colouring matter as well as methods for enhancing the light fastness after exposure and patterning by applying an after-mordant such as Tannins from Oak and Sumac, plants high in aluminium; Symplocos Cochinchinensis and Camellia alongside Aluminium, Iron or Copper acetates to the patterned materials after exposure or the application of UV blockers such as Vitamin C, lemon and lime juice that does not normally affect the colour of the patterning produced or effect the potential healing properties of material bases and dyestuffs employed.
    • Bioavailability of iodine in the UK-Peak District environment and its human bioaccessibility: an assessment of the causes of historical goitre in this area

      Mehra, Aradhana; Saikat, Sohel Quaderi; Carter, Joy E.; University of Derby (Springer, 2014-02)
      Iodine is an essential micronutrient for human health. Its deficiency causes a number of functional and developmental abnormalities such as goitre. The limestone region of Derbyshire, UK was goitre-endemic until it declined from the 1930s and the reason for this has escaped a conclusive explanation. The present study investigates the cause(s) of goitre in the UK-Peak District area through an assessment of iodine in terms of its environmental mobility, bioavailability, uptake into the food chain and human bioaccessibility. The goitre-endemic limestone area is compared with the background millstone grit area of the UK-Peak District. The findings of this study show that 'total' environmental iodine is not linked to goitre in the limestone area, but the governing factors include iodine mobility, bioavailability and bioaccessibility. Compared with the millstone grit area, higher soil pH and calcium content of the limestone area restrict iodine mobility in this area, also soil organic carbon in the limestone area is influential in binding the iodine to the soil. Higher calcium content in the limestone area is an important factor in terms of strongly fixing the iodine to the soil. Higher iodine bioaccessibility in the millstone grit than the limestone area suggests that its oral bioaccessibility is restricted in the limestone area. Iodine taken up by plant roots is transported freely into the aerial plant parts in the millstone grit area unlike the limestone area, thus providing higher iodine into the human food chain in the millstone grit area through grazing animals unlike the goitre-prevalent limestone area.
    • Biological Activity and Antidiabetic Potential of C-Terminal Octapeptide Fragments of the Gut-Derived Hormone Xenin

      Martin, Christine M.; Parthsarathy, Vadivel; Hasib, Annie; NG, Ming T.; McClean, Stephen; Flatt, Peter R.; Gault, Victor A.; Irwin, Nigel (Public Library of Science (PLoS), 2016-03-31)
      Xenin is a peptide that is co-secreted with the incretin hormone, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), from intestinal K-cells in response to feeding. Studies demonstrate that xenin has appetite suppressive effects and modulates glucose-induced insulin secretion. The present study was undertaken to determine the bioactivity and antidiabetic properties of two C-terminal fragment xenin peptides, namely xenin 18-25 and xenin 18-25 Gln. In BRIN-BD11 cells, both xenin fragment peptides concentration-dependently stimulated insulin secretion, with similar efficacy as the parent peptide. Neither fragment peptide had any effect on acute feeding behaviour at elevated doses of 500 nmol/kg bw. When administered together with glucose to normal mice at 25 nmol/kg bw, the overall insulin secretory effect was significantly enhanced in both xenin 18-25 and xenin 18-25 Gln treated mice, with better moderation of blood glucose levels. Twice daily administration of xenin 18-25 or xenin 18-25 Gln for 21 days in high fat fed mice did not affect energy intake, body weight, circulating blood glucose or body fat stores. However, circulating plasma insulin concentrations had a tendency to be elevated, particularly in xenin 18-25 Gln mice. Both treatment regimens significantly improved insulin sensitivity by the end of the treatment period. In addition, sustained treatment with xenin 18-25 Gln significantly reduced the overall glycaemic excursion and augmented the insulinotropic response to an exogenous glucose challenge on day 21. In harmony with this, GIP-mediated glucose-lowering and insulin-releasing effects were substantially improved by twice daily xenin 18-25 Gln treatment. Overall, these data provide evidence that C-terminal octapeptide fragments of xenin, such as xenin 18-25 Gln, have potential therapeutic utility for type 2 diabetes.