• The good things children notice in nature: An extended framework for reconnecting children with nature

      Harvey, Caroline; Hallam, Jenny; Richardson, Miles; Wells, Rachel; University of Derby (Elsevier BV, 2019-12-23)
      This research identifies themes emerging from a children’s writing task, where they wrote about good things they noticed in nature over a five day period. Eighty four children aged nine to eleven participated, resulting in 847 written statements. Content analysis using an emergent coding approach identified ten themes, with “Active Animals” being the most frequently occurring theme. Combining the themes with Author (2017a, b, c) pathways to nature connection provides an extended framework to inform children’s activity programmes, design of school grounds and urban spaces, aiming to connect children with nature. Future research could extend the framework into a practitioner’s tool kit.
    • Good timing: Implementing STEM careers strategy in secondary schools

      Finegold, Peter; Stagg, Peter; Hutchinson, Jo; Isinglass Consultancy; Warwick University; University of Derby (Centre for Education and Industry, University of Warwick, 2011)
      Good Timing is the final report of a three-year programme of work, commissioned by the Department for Education, and carried out by the Centre for Education and Industry at the University of Warwick (CEI), the International Centre for Guidance Studies at the University of Derby (iCeGS) and Isinglass Consultancy Ltd. The programme explored potential to embed STEM careers awareness in the early stages of secondary education.
    • Good volatility, bad volatility: what drives the asymmetric connectedness of Australian electricity markets?

      Apergis, Nicholas; Baruník, Jozef; Lau, Chi Keung Marco; University of Piraeus; Charles University; Northumbria University (Elsevier, 2017-06-22)
      Efficient delivery of network services and the electricity infrastructure to meet the long-term consumer's interests are the main objectives and the strategies of a national electricity market, while the main interests of generators are to maximize their profit through pricing strategies. Therefore, the objective of this study is to explore whether electricity prices across the four Australian States display symmetric price volatility connectedness. The study is the first attempt in the literature to make use of intraday 5-min Australian dispatch electricity prices, spanning the period December 8th, 1998 to May 5th, 2016 to quantify asymmetries in volatility connectedness emerging from good, and bad volatility. The results provide supportive evidence that the Australian electricity markets are connected asymmetrically implying the presence of some degree of market power that is exercised by generators across regional electricity markets.
    • Google scholar and e-journals.

      Bryson, David; University of Derby (2010-09)
    • Governance options for effective interprofessional education: Exposing the gap between education and healthcare services

      O’Keefe, Maree; Forman, Dawn; Moran, Monica; Steketee, Carole; The University of Adelaide, Australia; University of Derby; The University of Western, Australia; The University of Notre Dame Australia (Informa UK Limited, 2020-07-24)
      The increase in interprofessional models of collaborative practice and identification of health services as interprofessional organisations, sits somewhat awkwardly with traditional governance systems for both health services and educational institutions. Whereas health services have a primary focus on assuring competence and safety for health care practice, educational institutions have a primary focus on assuring academic standards within specific qualifications. Bridging the gap between these two systems with a workable option has proven challenging, especially in relation to interprofessional education (IPE). Given the need to ensure ‘work ready’ graduates within a more interprofessional and collaborative workforce, it is important to review the quality assurance governance models that are in place and to consider which of these existing governance systems, if either, is the more appropriate model for enabling and supporting IPE. This paper describes current issues in relation to governance for quality assurance, summarises the current state of research in the field and discusses potential governance options moving forward. Given that existing governance models are not meeting the challenges of IPE, there is a need to achieve greater alignment between the academic and health service governing systems.
    • Government inspiration vision statement and other recent developments: Policy Commentary 24

      Watts, A. G.; University of Derby (Careers England, 2013-11-24)
      This is the twenty-fourth in an occasional series of briefing notes on key policy documents related to the future of career guidance services in England. the Government also published an Inspiration Vision Statement. This has clearly been the basis for Ministerial statements in two recent Parliamentary question sessions: in the House of Lords on 23 October 2013; and in the House of Commons on 11 November 2013. This Policy Commentary analyses these various statements. It demonstrates that the Government, despite its earlier promises to achieve a renaissance of the careers profession, appears now to be writing careers professionals out of the policy script.
    • Government response to Education Select Committee Report : Careers England Policy Commentary 20

      Watts, A. G.; University of Derby (Careers England, 2013-04)
      This is the twentieth in an occasional series of briefing notes produced for Careers England on key policy documents related to the future of career guidance services in England. This briefing note describes and provides context to the Government response to Education Select Committee Report.
    • Government response to Heseltine Review: Careers England Policy Commentary 19

      Watts, A. G.; University of Derby (Careers England, 2013-03)
      This is the nineteenth in an occasional series of briefing notes produced for Careers England on key policy documents related to the future of career guidance services in England. This briefing note describes and provides context to the Heseltine Review report, 'No Stone Unturned: In Pursuit of Growth'.
    • Graduate career handbook: A supplementary guide to the handbook for providing career support and employability programmes

      Hooley, Tristram; Grant, Korin; University of Derby; Loughborough University (Crimson and Trotman, 2017)
      We have written this guide for both academics who are delivering employability modules within the curriculum and career and employability professionals who may be working in the curriculum, delivering services centrally, running skills awards and/or providing workshops and advice and guidance.
    • Graduate dress code: How undergraduates are planning to use hair, clothes and make-up to smooth their transition to the workplace

      Cutts, Beth; Hooley, Tristram; Yates, Julia; University of Derby; University of Derby; University of East London (2015-08-01)
      This article explores the relationship between students’ identities, their ideas about professional appearance and their anticipated transition to the world of work. It is based on a series of semi-structured interviews with 13 students from a vocationally-focused university in England. It was found that participants viewed clothing and appearance as an important aspect of their transition to the workplace. They believed that, if carefully handled, their appearance could help them to fit in and satisfy the expectations of employers, although some participants anticipated that this process of fitting in might compromise their identity and values. The article addresses students’ anticipated means of handling the tension between adapting to a new environment and ‘being themselves’. It is argued that the way this process is handled is intertwined with wider facets of identity – most notably those associated with gender.
    • Graduate gap years: Narratives of postponement in graduate employment transitions in England.

      Vigurs, Katy; Jones, Steven; Harris, Diane; Everitt, Julia; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-07-26)
      For UK higher education students, the ‘gap year’ or ‘year out’ is historically conceptualised as an amassing of wider life experience, often overseas, during a twelve-month period between the completion of A-level studies and the first year of a university degree. However, in a recent comparative study, which saw interviews conducted in both 2014 and 2015 with final year undergraduate students (n74) from different social backgrounds, across two English universities (one Russell Group university and one Post-1992 university), the term ‘gap year’ was being re-appropriated to capture something different. The term was being used to describe a period following graduation in which graduands planned to take low-paid work or ‘ordinary’ jobs, take stock of their financial situation, and attempt to save money and/or repay urgent debt. A high proportion of students in the 2015 stage of the study (16/37) spoke of taking a graduate gap year, compared with 9/37 in 2014. It may be that the increasing costs of debt-based forms of higher education payment coinciding with growing precarious employment has contributed to this situation. By borrowing the term gap year to describe a new and different phenomenon, some of the student interviewees may be legitimising the predicament in which they find themselves. This chapter explores the experiences of students who spoke of taking a graduate gap year. It examines the different roles of a graduate gap year and discusses wider implications for unequal graduate outcomes.
    • Graphic imagery is not sufficient for increased attention to cigarette warnings: the role of text captions

      Brown, Kyle G.; Reidy, John G.; Weighall, Anna R.; Arden, Madelynne A. (2013-05-30)
    • The gravitational pull of identity: Professional growth in sport, exercise, and performance psychologists

      Tod, David; McEwan, Hayley; Chandler, Charlotte; Eubank, Martin; Lafferty, Moira; Liverpool John Moores University; University of the West of Scotland; University of Derby; University of Chester (Informa UK Limited, 2020-10-07)
      Theories based in symbolic interactionism and narrative psychology can help us understand practitioner identity. Drawing on theories from these approaches, our purpose in this article is to distill research on sport psychologist growth, argue professional identity is a central goal in practitioner development, and offer applied implications. Professional growth includes movement from the self as an expert, who solves clients’ problems, to the self as a facilitator, who works alongside clients. Practitioners strive toward being authentic and along the way, develop self-awareness, learn to manage anxiety, and choose their preferred ways of working. A key feature of being authentic is an articulated professional identity. Practitioners can shape their professional identities by interacting with helpful people, consuming various genres of literature, and engaging in different types of writing.
    • Great Expectations: youth transitions in troubled times

      Atkins, Liz; Northumbria University (BERA, 01/09/2014)
      This paper draws on an empirical study conducted in the UK to explore some of the issues surrounding young people on the lowest level VET programmes and make suggestions about ways in which the learner experience at this level might be enhanced. UK policy perception of young people undertaking low level VET programmes in Further Education (FE) colleges tends to characterise them within a deficit model of social exclusion, disaffectionand disengagement(Colley, 2003:169). Many have special educational needs (Atkins, 2013a). They have been the focus of multiple initiatives in both the context of the New Labour 14-19 agenda, and more recently in the Coalition governments response to the Wolf Review of Vocational Education (2011). These initiatives have largely consisted of the provision of routes through a range of VET opportunities, allegedly to enable young people to engage with the knowledgesociety (Bathmaker, 2005). This paper problematises these notions of opportunity, drawing on the little storiesof four young people to argue that the rhetoric which permeates Government documents fails to consider the significance of young peoples social and educational positioning. Finally, the paper considers the implications of these issues in terms of future practice, policy and research in the UK context.
    • The Great War and British identity

      Whitehead, Ian; University of Derby (Pen & sword, 2018-06-18)
      In the context of the centenary commemorations, the chapter discusses the influence of the First World War on the evolution of British identity. It examines how the continued reinterpretation of the First World War has reflected different, often antagonistic, yet co-existing views of Britain and what it means to identify as British.
    • Greater expectations of graduate futures? A comparative analysis of the views of the last generation of lower-fees undergraduates and the first generation of higher-fees undergraduates at two English universities.

      Vigurs, Katy; Jones, Steven; Harris, Diane (Society for Research into Higher Education, 2016-02-01)
      Student finance in UK higher education (HE) has been radically reformed over the past twenty years and the changes in student finance policies have been the focus for a growing body of education research (see for example, Bowl and Hughes, 2014; Bachan, 2014; Wakeling and Jefferies, 2013; Wilkins et al., 2012; Dearden et al., 2011; Moore et al., 2011; McCaig, 2010; Callender and Jackson, 2008). The majority of these existing studies, however, focus on the impact of differing tuition fee levels on students’ enrolment behaviour and the beginning of students’ HE careers. There is little research that has investigated how the most recent increase in tuition fees and changes to student loans, under the 2012 student finance system, have affected the views of graduands (university students who are about to graduate) and their approaches toward their graduate futures. This scoping study has been developed to start to address this gap in knowledge and understanding. In 2014, prior to the SRHE research award, the research team produced a unique qualitative baseline of the views of a sample of undergraduate students who were graduating in the summer of 2014. These graduands were part of the last cohort of students to have paid lower tuition fees and would therefore be graduating with less student debt. This follow-up study, funded by the SRHE, sought to generate new data in order to be able to compare the views, ambitions and experience of a sample of 2014 graduands with a sample of 2015 graduands.
    • Green and lean: a Gemba–Kaizen model for sustainability enhancement.

      Cherrafi, A; Elfezazi, S; Hurley, B; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Kumar, V; Anosike, Anthony; Batista, L; Cadi Ayyad University; Rockwell Collins Inc.; University of Derby; et al. (Taylor and Francis, 2019-05-10)
      Despite the encouraging results obtained from the application of Green Lean, organizations have found the integration of Green and Lean, and their implementation as an integrated approach, challenging, especially when resources are limited. This paper aims to overcome some of these challenges by presenting a model for integrating Lean and Green based on the Gemba-Kaizen approach. The objective is to help organizations reduce their environmental waste in a practical and easy manner with limited resources. The proposed model was developed on the basis of a through literature review on Gemba and Kaizen, conducted on peer–reviewed journal articles and pragmatic books with managerial impact on the subject, and the more than 40 years of accumulated experience of the authors as academics, researchers, industrialists and consultants after having worked on a number of projects for multinational organisations that wanted to implement Lean Six Sigma and/or environmental management systems in various industrial sectors. The model was validated through two cases study in the aerospace and automotive industries. The results showed that the proposed model helped the case organizations to reduce the consumption of resources and improve their environmental performance. The proposed model can be the basis for further research on Lean and Green, contributing to help organizations to improve their sustainability performance. This research presents a first attempt to develop a model which integrates Lean and Green based on a combined Gemba-Kaizen approach.
    • The green care code: How nature connectedness and simple activities help explain pro‐nature conservation behaviours

      Richardson, Miles; Passmore, Holli‐Anne; barbett, lea; Lumber, Ryan; Thomas, Rory; Hunt, Alex; University of Derby; Insight and Data, National Trust, Swindon, UK (Wiley, 2020-07-08)
      The biodiversity crisis demands greater engagement in pro‐nature conservation behaviours. Research has examined factors which account for general pro‐environmental behaviour; that is, behaviour geared to minimizing one's impact on the environment. Yet, a dearth of research exists examining factors that account for pro‐nature conservation behaviour specifically—behaviour that directly and actively supports conservation of biodiversity. This study is the first of its kind to use a validated scale of pro‐nature conservation behaviour. Using online data from a United Kingdom population survey of 1,298 adults (16+ years), we examined factors (composed of nine variable‐blocks of items) that accounted for pro‐nature conservation behaviour. These were: individual characteristics (demographics, nature connectedness), nature experiences (time spent in nature, engaging with nature through simple activities, indirect engagement with nature), knowledge and attitudes (knowledge/study of nature, valuing and concern for nature) and pro‐environmental behaviour. Together, these explained 70% of the variation in people's actions for nature. Importantly, in a linear regression examining the relative importance of these variables to the prediction of pro‐nature conservation behaviour, time in nature did not emerge as significant. Engaging in simple nature activities (which is related to nature connectedness) emerged as the largest significant contributor to pro‐nature conservation behaviour. Commonality analysis revealed that variables worked together, with nature connectedness and engagement in simple activities being involved in the largest portion of explained variance. Overall, findings from the current study reinforce the critical role that having a close relationship with nature through simple everyday engagement plays in pro‐nature conservation behaviour. Policy recommendations are made.
    • Green fingered.

      Marmalade, Gemma; University of Derby (Birmingham Open Media, 2015)
      In partnership with Birmingham Pride Festival. The exhibition explores the possibility that those of homosexual persuasion are more likely to have a visceral impact on the cultivation of plants. During studies of communal lesbian gardeners throughout the 1970’s, German botanist Dr. Gerda Haeckel observed accelerated growth, crop abundance and overall increased vegetational health. Green Fingered investigates the territory of this research and visually interprets its findings through a series of specially commissioned artworks. Pherometer (2015) is a site specific suspended device that purports to measure the gradient of ‘ARQP’ (Atmospheric Responsive Queer Pheromones) in its vicinity through sensory plants attached via complex wired conduits. The Seed Series (2015) meanwhile is a collection of eight photographic portraits of some of Haeckel’s original subjects and their finest vegetable specimens. Trans Tent (2015) is an immersive, freestanding installation structure, akin to a hothouse and occupied by flora that respond to interaction through vibration and sound. Within it features a continually evolving kaleidoscopic audiovisual instructional guide to the rudiments of successful queer botany and futuristic predictions to the sustainability of bio produce. Marmalade invites the LGBT community to become subjects in the Trans Tent installation during Birmingham Pride weekend (23 to 24 May). This new video artwork incorporates performative excerpts and appropriated material in a parodic and absurdist response to the educational programmes of Haeckel’s era. Green Fingered explores how research in the medical and social sciences has to date focused on trying to identify genetic and psychological traits relating to sexuality. At a time when research continues to find the ‘gay gene’, Green Fingered coalesces aspects of gender and cultural studies with biological science through provocative visual experimentation.
    • Green fingered: Seed series

      Marmalade, Gemma; University of Derby (Various venues, 2016)
      Double Act: Art and Comedy explores how comedy helps us to shape meaning and negotiate the complexities of everyday life. Humour is a way of binding people together: providing consolation, a sense of shared experience and a powerful weapon of resistance. But, what we find funny can also be cruel, hateful, establishing symbolic boundaries that divide people into distinct groups, setting those with power against those without. The show draws together artists from diverse cultural and political contexts, each sharing an interest in humour as a resource to animate their art practice and to connect with an audience.