• 'Walking into the world of the western': David Michod's The Rover as Australian Post-Western.

      Neil Campbell; University of Derby (Wroclaw University, Poland, 2017)
      Examines David Michod's Australian film The Rover as a post-western, showing how it both uses and re-interprets the tropes of the western for a new age. In particular, it explores the global themes of the film and its transnational concerns with ecology, power and identity.
    • Walukagga the Black Smith

      Kasule, Samuel; University of Derby (Wavah Books Ltd, 2018-08)
      Walukagga (The Blacksmith) is the story of the Baganda in Uganda and their Chief whose tyrannical rule is brought to an end by a madman's wisdom. the story restores the power into the hands of the people. In the play, Walukagga challenges the growing threat of institutionalised extortion.
    • War and the ruby tree. The motif of the unborn generations in Jewish women’s story-telling

      Heywood, Simon; Cumbers, Shonaleigh; Heywood, Simon; University of Derby (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017-12-27)
      The Marks/Khymberg family oral storytelling tradition, currently practised publicly by Shanaleah Khymberg (Shonaleigh Cumbers) (b. 1971), includes a large number of cycles of fairy-tale-like stories (wundermaysel), including The Ruby Tree, a many-branched story-cycle showing affinities with well-known tales such as Rapunzel and Beauty and the Beast. Like other stories in the extensive family repertoire, The Ruby Tree was learned orally by Shonaleigh in childhood from her grandmother, Edith Marks. Edith Marks herself trained and practised as a community storyteller or drut'syla (cf. Yiddish dertseyler "storyteller") in the pre-war Netherlands, before carrying the family repertoire in her memory, through Holocaust and postwar relocation to Britain, and teaching it to her grand-daughter in accordance with traditional practice. The imagery of The Ruby Tree, as the story is told by Shonaleigh today, resonates with the often traumatic history of the story's transmission from the pre-war Netherlands to the modern international storytelling circuit. We aim to discuss the story-cycle as a variant of well-known international oral folktale-types, before narrating the dramatic changes of context which the Marks/Khymberg family tradition has undergone, and drawing conclusions about the effects of war, deportation, mass-murder and postwar dispersal on the meaning of this ancient story as it re-emerges in dialogue with its modern context.
    • Water efficiency-people and communities

      Tracada, Eleni; Bell, Sarah; Unversity of Derby; University College London (The WATEF Network, University of Brighton, 2015-08)
    • Water-fountain-sculpture.

      Locke, Caroline; Wermers, Nicole; Bussmann, Valarie; Pye, William; Janzing, Godehard; German Forum for Art History; University of Derby (Henry Moore Foundation, 28/01/2017)
      This seminar event explored how water and fountains have been used by artists and sculptors for a variety of purposes. The afternoon began with a discussion of Marcel Duchamp's 'Fountain' (1917) and examined more recent examples of water sculpture such as the memorial at Ground Zero. In collaboration with Dr Godehard Janzing (Deutsches Forum für Kunstgeschichte), Valerie Bussmann (independent), Nicole Wermers (artist), William Pye (artist) and Caroline Locke (artist) . Godehard Janzing discussed ‘Falling Waters at Ground Zero: when Terrorism turns into Nature’ and how the use of the symbolism of water becomes problematic in this context. Valerie Bussmann continued the theme of the city with an examination of the relationship Paris has with water as both necessity and art. Water as a sculptural material was explored by Nicole Wermers, focusing specifically on her 2011 series ‘Wasserregal’ (‘Watershelves’). Caroline Locke shared the themes of water and vibration that have formed a key part of her practice. William Pye has long been inspired by water and first introduced it as a major sculptural element in his work in the 1980s.
    • Wavelet transform applications in active filters

      Centonza, A.; Darwish, Mostafa; Kharaz, Ahmad H.; Darwish, Mohamed; Brunel University; University of Wales, Newport; University of Derby (2013-03)
    • “We all had an experience in there together”: a discursive psychological analysis of collaborative paranormal accounts by paranormal investigation Team members

      Childs, Carrie; Murray, Craig D. (Taylor and Francis, 2013-05-24)
      This is a study of the verbal accounts of paranormal investigators. The focus of analysis is upon the rhetorical organization of event descriptions in ways that establish the factual status of reports in order to highlight the inherent problems associated with current understandings of reports of spontaneous cases. Drawing upon a corpus of interviews conducted with six investigation group members, analysis was conducted using discursive psychology, in particular the rhetorical approach, with an examination of the ways in which accounts were presented and the interactional consequences of describing events in particular ways. Analysis revealed how speakers worked to imply the paranormal status of events while avoiding explicitly labelling experiences as “paranormal.” By focussing upon the production of event descriptions, the construction of intersubjectivity and the importance of the context in which accounts are elicited, the current work has implications for the way in which parapsychologists currently utilize and understand accounts of spontaneous cases.
    • ‘We wanted to change that particular part of the world': the role of academics in the career development field, learning from the career of Tony Watts

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Journal of the National Institute for Career Education and Counselling, 2014-10)
      This article uses a career case-study with Tony Watts to explore the interface of an academic career with policy and practice. It finds that, in Tony’s case, public engagement was driven by a social and political mission. Such engagement is shaped by both the institutional arrangements within which the academic is situated and the political and organisational structures of the part of the world into which they try to intervene. While it is difficult to generalise from a single case, the article concludes by suggesting some key themes which academics may wish to attend to in navigating these issues of engagement and the nature of academic roles.
    • "We've been exploring and adventuring." A investigation into young people's engagement with a semi wild, disused space

      Hallam, Jenny; Gallagher, Laurel; Harvey, Caroline; University of Derby (APA, 2019-10-24)
      This paper uses ethnography to explore young people’s engagement with an intervention run by Feral Spaces which was designed to promote a meaningful connection to a disused space. Over the course of three sessions, each lasting two hours, seven young people aged between 11 and 12 years old took part in a range of den building activities in a semi-wild area which was local to them. The sessions were recorded using audio and video equipment and an inductive thematic analysis informed by a realist framework was used to analyse the naturalistic data collected. The analysis presents four themes - engaging with the environment, developing a sense of awe and wonder, respect and attachment to the space and a sense of belonging which map out the young people’s growing connection to nature evidenced during the intervention. Within each of these themes the young people’s experiences are discussed in relation to theory of biophilia and the pathways to nature model in order to evaluate their relevance for researchers and practitioners who seek to understand children’s connection with nature and promote it. Furthermore, the positive relationships and emotions experienced during the intervention are explored. It is argued that the community-based intervention developed the young people’s understandings of the natural world and their confidence to engage with it in a personally meaningful way. This had positive implications in terms of supporting the young people’s wellbeing.
    • Web-building spiders attract prey by storing decaying matter.

      Bjorkman-Chiswell, Bojun T.; Kulinski, Melissa M.; Muscat, Robert L.; Nguyen, Kim A.; Norton, Briony, A.; Symonds, Matthew R. E.; Westhorpe, Gina E.; Elgar, Mark A.; University of Melbourne; James Cook University (Springer, 2004-05-01)
      The orb-weaving spider Nephila edulis incorporates into its web a band of decaying animal and plant matter. While earlier studies demonstrate that larger spiders utilise these debris bands as caches of food, the presence of plant matter suggests additional functions. When organic and plastic items were placed in the webs of N. edulis, some of the former but none of the latter were incorporated into the debris band. Using an Y-maze olfactometer, we show that sheep blowflies Lucilia cuprina are attracted to recently collected debris bands, but that this attraction does not persist over time. These data reveal an entirely novel foraging strategy, in which a sit-and-wait predator attracts insect prey by utilising the odours of decaying organic material. The spider’s habit of replenishing the debris band may be necessary to maintain its efficacy for attracting prey.
    • What can careers workers learn from the study of narrative?

      Hooley, Tristram; Rawlinson, Mark; University of Derby (NICEC, 2011-02)
    • What drives prioritized visual processing? A motivational relevance account

      Maratos, Frances A.; Pessoa, Luiz; University of Derby; University of Maryland (Elsevier, 2019-04-29)
      Emotion is fundamental to our being, and an essential aspect guiding behavior when rapid responding is required. This includes whether we approach or avoid a stimulus, and the accompanying physiological responses. A common tenet is that threat-related content drives stimulus processing and biases visual attention, so that rapid responding can be initiated. In this paper, it will be argued instead that prioritization of threatening stimuli should be encompassed within a motivational relevance framework. To more fully understand what is, or is not, prioritized for visual processing one must, however, additionally consider: (i) stimulus ambiguity and perceptual saliency; (ii) task demands, including both perceptual load and cognitive load; and (iii) endogenous/affective states of the individual. Combined with motivational relevance, this then leads to a multifactorial approach to understanding the drivers of prioritized visual processing. This accords with current recognition that the brain basis allowing for visual prioritization is also multifactorial, including transient, dynamic and overlapping networks. Taken together, the paper provides a reconceptualization of how “emotional” information prioritizes visual processing.
    • What is acceptance, and how could it affect health outcomes for people receiving renal dialysis?

      Stalker, Carol; Elander, James; Mitchell, Kathryn; Taal, Maarten W.; Selby, Nicholas; Stewart, Paul; University of Derby; University of Nottingham (British Psychological Society, 2018-07-20)
      Renal dialysis is a life-saving treatment for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) but is burdensome, invasive and expensive. Patients’ experiences of dialysis and the outcomes of their treatment could potentially be improved by focusing on ‘acceptance’. However, the concept of acceptance has been used in different ways. This article examines ways that acceptance has been conceptualised in research on chronic illness generally and ESRD specifically, and makes proposals for research to understand better what acceptance means for people with ESRD. The aim is to assist the development of acceptance-related measures and interventions to support people with ESRD.
    • What is online research?: using the Internet for Social Science research

      Hooley, Tristram; Marriott, John; Wellens, Jane; University of Derby (Bloomsbury Academic, 2012-06)
      Online research is perhaps the most obvious but also the most difficult of research methods. What is Online Research? is a straightforward, accessible introduction to social research online. The book covers the key issues and concerns for all social scientists, with sections on research design, ethics and good practice. Short, clear case studies are used throughout to allow students to see examples of the research in practice. Wide ranging and interdisciplinary, What is Online Research Methods? shows researchers how to engage in the online environment in innovative ways, and points the way forward for future research.
    • What is the impact of University work-based learning for early year's practitioners in Norway and England? Examples of processes, outcomes and impact from the undertaking of work-based projects

      Atkins, Liz; Furu, Anne; Heslop, Kay; Kaarby, Karen Marie; Lindboe, Inger Marie; Mpofu-Currie, Lucy; Northumbria University (Open University, 01/02/2018)
      This paper is focused on partnership work between academics in Norway and England involved in the teaching of university and work-based learning programmes. Initiated four years ago, the collaboration has developed into a community of practice involving a range of shared activities. These activities include academic and student exchanges, nursery visits, seminars and workshops, which culminate in a joint conference presentation. This paper explores the cultural and curricula differences between the two programmes, and considers how these impact on the individual practitioners undertaking them and on the settings in which they work. The data draws on four students' experiences to exemplify learning in a work-based context. Ethical issues were addressed in a manner consistent with the British Education Research Association (BERA) (2011) guidelines for educational research, and the study utilised theoretical frameworks that drew on concepts of work-based learning (e.g. Colley et al., 2003). Findings suggest that, despite the significant differences in culture and curricula approach, both programmes appear to enhance the practice of practitioners in early years. Key impacts of the programme included evidence of personal change and professional development (Mpofu-Currie, 2015), which were reflective of democratic rather than instrumental notions of professionalism (Atkins and Tummons, 2017). There was also evidence of significant gains in knowledge, manifested through improved pedagogy and more meaningful engagement with the children in each setting. This work demonstrates the benefits of knowledge exchange and dialogue to promote cross-cultural learning experiences. The authors hope that it will inform the development of innovative work-based learning programmes and wider policy in relation to work-based learning, as well as knowledge transfer between Norway and England.
    • What kingdoms may come

      Rushton, Stephanie; University of Derby (Triennial of Photography Hamburg, 2015-06-18)
      Photography Exhibition 'What Kingdoms May Come' at Container City part of Eight museum exhibitions under the motto THE DAY WILL COME The international photo festival Triennial of Photography Hamburg brought out the best in Hamburg as a city of photography, with numerous photo exhibitions and events at various locations spotlighting the theme of “The Future.” From 18 – 28 June 2015, international photo professionals and enthusiasts met at the Alster. The ten days of the festival featured an extensive program of events.
    • What opportunity cost of holding real balances? The case of Greece 1978–1993.

      Apergis, Nicholas; University of Macedonia (Taylor & Francis, 2006-11-02)
      In this paper cointegration techniques have been applied to identify the role of opportunity cost in the demand for real balances in the Greek case and covering the period 1978–93. The results reveal that it is the simultaneous presence of nominal interest rates, the expected inflation and the expected depreciation variables that must be used as proxies for the opportunity cost.
    • What west? Worlding the western in Hernan Diaz's in the distance

      Campbell, Neil; University of Derby (University of Nebraska Press, 2019)
      The essay examines Hernan Diaz's novel In the Distance as an example of "worlding", showing how it interrupts conventions of the western to explore a postexceptionalist view of the West as a space of difference in which worlds collide.
    • What works? The evidence base for teacher CPD delivered by employers.

      Dodd, Vanessa; University of Derby (The Careers & Enterprise Company, 2017-12-04)
      Teacher continuing professional development (CPD) delivered by employers can refer to a variety of professional development activities where an employer is the primary facilitator of training. But what impact do teacher placements have and what can we learn about lessons in best practice? This paper provides an overview of the evidence for teacher continuing professional development (CPD) provided by employers with the aim of clarifying possible impacts and identifying effective best practice.