• Validação da escala percepção de autoeficácia daparentalidade materna em amostra brasileira

      Adamson-Macedo, Elvidina N.; Tristao, Rosana; Neiva , Elaine; Barnes, Christopher; University of Derby; University of Oxford; Universidade de Brasília; University of Wolverhampton (Revista Brasileira de Crescimento e Desenvolvimento Humano, 2015-10-25)
      Self-efficacy matches the belief that a person has that she is able to produce theresults she wants to achieve. The beliefs of self-efficacy that parents have about the baby emerge asa powerful predictor of positive parenting. Objective: this study aimed to evaluate the maternalself-efficacy behavior in hospitalized mothers and validate an instrument for measuring this conceptdeveloped and validated in England by Barnes and Adamson-Macedo, in 2007. Method: this cross-sectional exploratory study convenience cohort comprised 87 mothers of newborn babies, 26premature and 61 full-term infants. The scale Perceived Maternal Parenting Self-Efficacy (PMP S-E),which consists of 20 items that represent four subscales was tested for reliability and validity. Results:the internal consistency of the scale PAEPM reached a value of .86, the internal consistency andreliability estimates for each of the subscales also reached acceptable values. Exploratory FactorAnalysis (EFA) confirmed the validity of the construct and the scores of self-efficacy were normallydistributed for both subgroups and total sample. Conclusions: PMP S-E scale proved to be an easyapplication tool and psychometrically robust, reliable and valid for use with mothers of hospitalizednew-borns both premature as the term clinically stable. It is a reliable method of identifying mothersof babies who need more support from the hospital staff.
    • Validation of a quad-rotor helicopter matlab/simulink and solidworks models

      Poyi, Gwangtim Timothy; Wu, Mian Hong; Bousbaine, Amar; Wiggins, Bruce (IET Control and Automation Conference, 2013-06-04)
    • Validation of the English version of the scale for psychosocial factors in food allergy and the relationship with mental health, quality of life, and self-efficacy

      Knibb, Rebecca C.; Cortes, Aaron; Barnes, Christopher; Stalker, Carol; Aston University; University of Derby; Universidad de Chile Clinical Hospital (2016-08-21)
      Background. The Scale for Psychosocial Factors in Food Allergy (SPS-FA) is based on the biopsychosocial model of health and was developed and validated in Chile to measure the interaction between psychological variables and allergy symptoms in the child. We sought to validate this scale in an English speaking population and explore its relationship with parental quality of life, self-efficacy, and mental health. Methods. Parents (𝑛 = 434) from the general population in the UK, who had a child with a clinical diagnosis of food allergy, completed the SPS-FA and validated scales on food allergy specific parental quality of life (QoL), parental self-efficacy, and general mental health. Findings. The SPS-FA had good internal consistency (alphas = .61–.86). Higher scores on the SPS-FA significantly correlated with poorer parental QoL, self-efficacy, and mental health. All predictors explained 57% of the variance in SPS-FA scores with QoL as the biggest predictor (𝛽 = .52). Discussion. The SPS-FA is a valid scale for use in the UK and provides a holistic view of the impact of food allergy on the family. In conjunction with health-related QoL measures, it can be used by health care practitioners to target care for patients and evaluate psychological interventions for improvement of food allergy management.
    • Validation of the HADRIAN system using an ATM evaluation case study

      Summerskill, Steve; Marshall, Russell; Case, Keith; Gyi, Diane E.; Sims, Ruth; Davis, Peter; Day, Philip N.; Rohan, C.; Birnie, S.; Loughborough University (2010)
      The HADRIAN human modelling system is under development as part of the EPSRC funded AUNT-SUE project. The HADRIAN system aims to foster a 'design for all' ethos by allowing ergonomists and designers to see the effects of different kinds of disability on the physical capabilities of elderly and people with disabilities. This system is based upon the long established SAMMIE system, and uses data collected from 102 people, 79 of whom are registered as disabled, or have age related mobility issues. The HADRIAN system allows three dimensional CAD data of new products to be imported, with a subsequent automated analysis using all of the 102 sample members. The following paper describes the process and results gathered from a validation study using an ATM design as a case study. The results indicated that fine tuning of the behavioural data built into HADRIAN would improve the accuracy of an automated product analysis.
    • Validation of the HADRIAN system using an ATM evaluation case study

      Summerskill, Steve; Marshall, Russell; Case, Keith; Gyi, Diane E.; Sims, Ruth; Davis, Peter; Loughborough University (2009)
      The HADRIAN human modelling system is under development as part of the EPSRC funded AUNT-SUE project. The HADRIAN system aims to foster a ‘design for all’ ethos by allowing ergonomists and designers to see the effects of different kinds of disability on the physical capabilities of elderly and disabled people. This system is based upon the long established SAMMIE system, and uses data collected from 102 people, 79 of whom are registered as disabled, or have age related mobility issues. The HADRIAN system allows three dimensional CAD data of new products to be imported, with a subsequent automated analysis using all of the 102 sample members. The following paper describes the process and results gathered from a validation study using an ATM design as a case study. The results indicated that fine tuning of the behavioural data built into HADRIAN would improve the accuracy of an automated product analysis.
    • Value co-creation in temporary, independent retailing: a study of customer value perceptions of pop-up stores

      Foster, Carley; Brindley, Clare; Ghosh, Biswaraj; Armannsdottir, Guja; University of Derby; Nottingham Trent University (2017-07-05)
    • Values and ethics in CBT

      Kingdon, David; Maguire, Nick; Stalmeisters, Dzintra; Townend, Michael; University of Derby (Sage, 2017-03-17)
      This book covers the values and ethics in the field of CBT.
    • Variation in size frequency distribution of coral populations under different fishing pressures in two contrasting locations in the Indian Ocean

      Grimsditch, Gabriel; Pisapia, Chiara; Huck, Maren; Karisa, Juliet; Obura, David; Sweet, Michael J.; International Union for the Conservation of Nature; James Cook University; University of Derby; Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute; et al. (Elsevier, 2017-09-23)
      This study aimed to assess how the size-frequency distributions of coral genera varied between reefs under different fishing pressures in two contrasting Indian Ocean locations (the Maldives and East Africa). Using generalized linear mixed models, we were able to demonstrate that complex interactions occurred between coral genera, coral size class and fishing pressure. In both locations, we found Acropora coral species to be more abundant in non-fished compared to fished sites (a pattern which was consistent for nearly all the assessed size classes). Coral genera classified as ‘stress tolerant’ showed a contrasting pattern i.e. were higher in abundance in fished compared to non-fished sites. Site specific variations were also observed. For example, Maldivian reefs exhibited a significantly higher abundance in all size classes of ‘competitive’ corals compared to East Africa. This possibly indicates that East African reefs have already been subjected to higher levels of stress and are therefore less suitable environments for ‘competitive’ corals. This study also highlights the potential structure and composition of reefs under future degradation scenarios, for example with a loss of Acropora corals and an increase in dominance of ‘stress tolerant’ and ‘generalist’ coral genera.
    • Variations in retail employment characteristics and travel-to-work and their implications for retail-led regeneration

      Whysall, P.; Foster, Carley; Harris, Lynette; Nottingham Trent University (2008)
    • Ventilatory muscle strength, diaphragm thickness and pulmonary function in world-class powerlifters.

      Brown, Peter I.; Venables, Heather; Liu, Hymsuen; de Witt, Julie T.; Brown, Michelle R.; Faghy, Mark; University of Derby (Springer, 2013)
      Resistance training activates the ventilatory muscles providing a stimulus similar to ventilatory muscle training. We examined the effects of elite powerlifting training upon ventilatory muscle strength, pulmonary function and diaphragm thickness in world-class powerlifters (POWER) and a control group (CON) with no history of endurance or resistance training, matched for age, height and body mass.
    • Victoria Lucas lay of the land: landscape and other stories.

      McCloskey, Paula; University of Derby (Airspace gallery., 2017-05)
      A critical essay exploring the themes in Victoria Lucas' exhibition 'The lay of the land and other stories'.
    • Virtual fitting trails using SAMMIE and HADRIAN

      Marshall, Russell; Porter, J. Mark; Case, Keith; Sims, Ruth; Gyi, Diane E.; Loughborough University (2003)
      Fitting trials are a common technique employed in ergonomics evaluation. Fitting trials employ a panel of users carefully selected to be representative of the population at which the product, or environment, has been targeted. The panel are then used to evaluate the design against a set of criteria in order to determine a level of suitability of the design. Whilst traditionally this process has taken place with real people and full size mock-ups, increasingly the process is becoming computer supported and makes use of CAD models and human manikins in a ‘virtual’ fitting trial. The use of these technologies can clearly play a key role in supporting user-centred design, however, there are a number of shortcomings in the current technology, data, and infrastructure used for computer aided ergonomics evaluations in design. This paper will introduce HADRIAN, a computer aided ergonomics analysis tool developed at Loughborough University. HADRIAN works together with the existing system SAMMIE. The paper will focus on the novel aspects of the systems demonstrating how, together they may be employed to not only make virtual fitting trails more efficacious but also encourage empathy with the end user.
    • Virtual task analysis in 'design for all'.

      Marshall, Russell; Case, Keith; Porter, J. Mark; Gyi, Diane E.; Sims, Ruth; Loughborough University (2003)
      Design for All’ or ‘Inclusive Design’ is an approach to product, environment or service design that aims to maximise the applicability of a particular design. However, the concept is not to tailor designs in a bespoke fashion, but rather to provide a single solution that accommodates the needs of all users including those who are older or disabled. In order to educate and support the designer in their endeavours to ‘Design for All’ a computer aided design and analysis tool has been developed. The tool, known as HADRIAN, has been developed to meet two key areas of deficiency in existing approaches. HADRIAN provides improved data for the designer with a sample database of 100 individuals across a broad spectrum of ages and abilities. HADRIAN also provides a means of using this data for ergonomics evaluations through a task analysis tool. Working in combination with the existing human modelling system SAMMIE the system allows the designer to assess their designs against the population in the database to determine the percentage who are effectively ‘designed out’.
    • Virtual task simulation for inclusive design.

      Marshall, Russell; Case, Keith; Summerskill, Steve; Sims, Ruth; Gyi, Diane E.; Davis, Peter; Loughborough University (2009)
      Human modelling tools provide a means to perform virtual task evaluations upon designs within the computer environment. The ability to evaluate the accommodation of a design early on in the design process before physical prototypes can be built has many advantages. These advantages are particularly relevant in supporting people in attempting to design products that are inclusive and accessible. HADRIAN is a new tool developed to provide accessible, and applicable data on people with a broad range of size, age, and ability together with a means of optimising virtual task evaluations. This paper describes the use of HADRIAN in performing a task evaluation, focusing on the underlying methodology that aims to achieve a virtual simulation that mimics a real world user trial.
    • Visions, dreams and reality: The limited possibilities for level 1 post-16 students

      Atkins, Liz; University of Huddersfield (01/09/2007)
      This paper discusses the findings of a study exploring the aspirations and learning identities of 3 groups of level 1 students in 2 English Further Education (FE) colleges. It gives a brief description of the methodology employed and an overview of each of the three groups. It then summarises the findings from the data, to provide a context for the discussion which considers the key themes arising from the study. Drawing on the data and on relevant literature, the paper goes on to explore the positioning of these young people in the context of class and gender stereotypes, their aspirations and developing identities.
    • "Visual media primitivism: toward a Poetic Ethnography’"

      Nicoletti, Martino; University of Derby, School of Art and Design (Oxford-New York, 2013)
      This article – based on an experimental research carried out by the author in Thailand and founded on the systematic employment of vintage analogue lens-based media – provides an original contribution to the epistemology of visual anthropology and to its relation with contemporary visual art practices.
    • Visual processing speeds in children

      Maratos, Frances A.; Croker, Steve; University of Derby (Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2011-03)
      The aim of this study was to investigate visual processing speeds in children. A rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) task with schematic faces as stimuli was given to ninety-nine 6–10-year-old children as well as a short form of the WISC-III. Participants were asked to determine whether a happy face stimulus was embedded in a stream of distracter stimuli. Presentation time was gradually reduced from 500 ms per stimulus to 100 ms per stimulus, in 50 ms steps. The data revealed that (i) RSVP speed increases with age, (ii) children aged 8 years and over can discriminate stimuli presented every 100 ms—the speed typically used with RSVP procedures in adult and adolescent populations, and (iii) RSVP speed is significantly correlated with digit span and object assembly. In consequence, the RSVP paradigm presented here is appropriate for use in further investigations of processes of temporal attention within this cohort.
    • Visualization and analysis tools for low-frequency propagation in a generalized 3D acoustic space

      Hill, Adam J.; Hawksford, Malcolm O. J.; University of Essex (Audio Engineering Society, 2011-05)
      A software toolbox is described that enables three-dimensional animated visualization and analysis of low-frequency wave propagation within a generalized acoustic environment. The core computation exploits a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm selected because of its known low-frequency accuracy. Multiple sources can be configured and analyses performed at user-selected measurement locations. Arbitrary excitation sequences enable virtual measurements embracing both time-domain and spatio-frequency-domain analyses. Examples are presented for a variety of low-frequency loudspeaker placements and room geometries to illustrate the utility of the toolbox for various acoustical design challenges.
    • The vulnerability of rules in complex work environments: dynamism and uncertainty pose problems for cognition

      Clewley, Richard; Stupple, Edward J. N.; University of Derby (2015-01-15)
      Many complex work environments rely heavily on cognitive operators using rules. Operators sometimes fail to implement rules, with catastrophic human, social and economic costs. Rule-based error is widely reported, yet the mechanisms of rule vulnerability have received less attention. This paper examines rule vulnerability in the complex setting of airline transport operations. We examined ‘the stable approach criteria rule’, which acts as a system defence during the approach to land. The study experimentally tested whether system state complexity influenced rule failure. The results showed increased uncertainty and dynamism led to increased likelihood of rule failure. There was also an interaction effect, indicating complexity from different sources can combine to further constrain rule-based response. We discuss the results in relation to recent aircraft accidents and suggest that ‘rule-based error’ could be progressed to embrace rule vulnerability, fragility and failure. This better reflects the influence that system behaviour and cognitive variety have on rule-based response. Practitioner Summary: In this study, we examined mechanisms of rule vulnerability in the complex setting of airline transport operations. The results suggest work scenarios featuring high uncertainty and dynamism constrain rule-based response, leading to rules becoming vulnerable, fragile or failing completely. This has significant implications for rule-intensive, safety critical work environments.