• The Observatory’ Issue One ‘BEIGE’

      Tomlinson, Tracy (Visual Communication Research Group, 2009-09)
      This is issue one of ‘The Observatory’ is an ongoing research project, exploring colour semiotics and visual meaning. The project was established by myself through the Visual Communication Research Group in 2009 and has received funding from the University of Derby ‘Open Studio’ and Teaching Quality Enhancement Fund. The research takes the form of a periodical publication. Each issue proposes a colour theme, which a collective group of contributors make responses to, thereby creating the content. The responses take the form of words, photographs, drawings and other visual interpretations. The project explores the potential for a ’conversation’ of responses to a defined, named colour to come together in the concrete form of the printed page and for these responses to be shared with one another and a wider audience. The publication has provided a platform for the promotion and encouragement of research activity in the Visual Communication area.
    • The Observatory’ Issue Three ‘TANGERINE’

      Tomlinson, Tracy (Visual Communication Research Group, 2011-11)
      This is issue three of ‘The Observatory’, which is an ongoing research project exploring colour semiotics and visual meaning. The project was established by myself through the Visual Communication Research Group in 2009 and has received funding from the University of Derby ‘Open Studio’ and Teaching Quality Enhancement Fund. The research takes the form of a periodical publication. Each issue proposes a colour theme, which a collective group of contributors make responses to, thereby creating the content. The responses take the form of words, photographs, drawings and other visual interpretations. The project explores the potential for a ’conversation’ of responses to a defined, named colour to come together in the concrete form of the printed page and for these responses to be shared with one another and a wider audience. The publication has provided a platform for the promotion and encouragement of research activity in the Visual Communication area.
    • The Observatory’ Issue Two ‘VERMILION’

      Tomlinson, Tracy (Visual Communication Research Group, 2010-10)
      This is issue two of ‘The Observatory’, which is an ongoing research project exploring colour semiotics and visual meaning. The project was established by myself through the Visual Communication Research Group in 2009 and has received funding from the University of Derby ‘Open Studio’ and Teaching Quality Enhancement Fund. The research takes the form of a periodical publication. Each issue proposes a colour theme, which a collective group of contributors make responses to, thereby creating the content. The responses take the form of words, photographs, drawings and other visual interpretations. The project explores the potential for a ’conversation’ of responses to a defined, named colour to come together in the concrete form of the printed page and for these responses to be shared with one another and a wider audience. The publication has provided a platform for the promotion and encouragement of research activity in the Visual Communication area.
    • Obsessive passion: a dependency associated with injury-related risky behaviour in dancers.

      Akehurst, Sally; Oliver, Emily J.; University of Derby; Aberystwyth University (Routledge, 2013-09-09)
      Grounded in self-determination theory, obsessive passion for an activity has been associated with increased risky behaviour and rigid persistence, both symptomatic of dependence. However, it is unknown whether obsessive passion may predict the development of dependence, and furthermore, theoretically important relationships between basic need satisfaction, passion, exercise dependence and subsequent risky behaviour have not been fully explored. A sample of 100 professional dancers (50fs; 50ms; Mage = 20.88; SD = 2.69) completed self-ratings of risk-related behaviours (doctor visits; following treatment, and warming up), passion for dance and dance dependence. Findings supported the maladaptive nature of obsessive passion in relation to risky behaviour and as predicted dance dependence mediated this relationship. Interestingly, need satisfaction was positively related to both obsessive passion and harmonious passion. Results are discussed in the light of self-determination theory and dysfunctions of obsessive passion, suggesting that professional dancers are at risk of employing maladaptive behaviours if high in obsessive passion, which may be detectable via symptoms of dance dependence.
    • The odyssey: school to work transitions, serendipity and position in the field.

      Atkins, Liz; Department of Education and Lifelong Learning, Northumbria University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK.; Department of Education and Lifelong Learning, Northumbria University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK (Taylor and Francis., 2016-02-15)
      Little work on the significance and implications of decision-making has been undertaken since that led by Hodkinson in the 1990s, and the experiences of young people on vocational programmes and their reasons for undertaking them remain under-theorised and poorly understood. Drawing on two narratives from a study exploring young people’s motivations for undertaking vocational programmes, this article explores the relationship between their positioning in fields and career decision-making. The article argues that social positioning is significant in its relationship to decision-making, to the way in which young people perceive and construct their careers and to the influence of serendipity on their transitions. Drawing on a range of international studies, the article explores the implications of these findings in terms of young people’s future engagement with the global labour market, giving consideration to (dissonant) perceptions of vocational education and training as contributing to economic growth whilst addressing issues of social exclusion and promoting social justice.
    • Of apples and oranges? The evolution of “monogamy” in non-human primates

      Huck, Maren; Di Fore, Anthony; Fernandez-Duque, Eduardo; University of Derby, Environmental Sustainability Research Centre; University of Texas at Austin; Yale University (Frontiers, 2020-01-10)
      Behavioral ecologists, evolutionary biologists, and anthropologists have been long fascinated by the existence of “monogamy” in the animal kingdom. Multiple studies have explored the factors underlying its evolution and maintenance, sometimes with contradicting and contentious conclusions. These studies have been plagued by a persistent use of fuzzy terminology that often leads to researchers comparing “apples with oranges” (e.g., comparing a grouping pattern or social organization with a sexual or genetic mating system). In this review, we provide an overview of research on “monogamy” in mammals generally and primates in particular, and we discuss a number of problems that complicate comparative attempts to understand this issue. We first highlight why the muddled terminology has hindered our understanding of both a rare social organization and a rare mating system. Then, following a short overview of the main hypotheses explaining the evolution of pair-living and sexualmonogamy, we critically discuss various claims about the principal drivers of “monogamy” that have been made in several recent comparative studies.We stress the importance of using only high quality and comparable data. We then propose that a productive way to frame and dissect the different components of pair-living and sexual or genetic monogamy is by considering the behavioral and evolutionary implications of those components from the perspectives of all participants in a species’ social system. In particular, we highlight the importance of integrating the perspective of “floater” individuals and considering their impacts on local operational sex ratios, competition, and variance in reproductive success across a population. We stress that pair-living need not imply a reduced importance of intrasexual mate competition, a situation that may have implications for the sexual selection potential that have not yet been fully explored. Finally, we note that there is no reason to assume that different taxa and lineages, even within the same radiation, should follow the same pathway to or share a unifying evolutionary explanation for “monogamy”. The study of the evolution of pair-living, sexual monogamy, and genetic monogamy remains a challenging and exciting area of research.
    • Ofsted thematic review and Government action plan: Careers England Policy Commentary 23

      Watts, A. G. (Careers England, 2013-09)
      The Ofsted review of career guidance provision in schools describes in detail the erosion that has taken place as a result of recent Government policies, and the limited nature of current provision in most schools. A Government Action Plan issued alongside the review proposes revisions to the Statutory Guidance for schools, and a limited extension of the role of the National Careers Service in relation to schools, without new funding. The proposed actions fall substantially short of those recommended by the House of Commons Education Select Committee.
    • The oil curse, institutional quality, and growth in MENA countries: Evidence from time-varying cointegration

      Apergis, Nicholas; Payne, James; University of Piraeus; Georgia College & State University (Elsevier, 2014-09-16)
      This study re-examines the impact of oil abundance on economic growth in a number of MENA (Middle East and North African) countries for the period 1990–2013. Given the number of economic and institutional reforms undertaken by these countries in recent years, we incorporate measures of institutional quality to evaluate if oil abundance impacts economic growth differently. The results from time-varying cointegration reveal that better institutional quality reduces the unfavorable effect of oil reserves on the performance of the real economy.
    • Oil reserve life and the influence of crude oil prices: An analysis of Texas reserves.

      Apergis, Nicholas; Ewing, Bradley; Payne, James; University of Piraeus; Texas Tech University; Georgia College & State University (Elsevier., 2016-02-27)
      Oil producing exploration and production companies generate revenue from reserves which, from any given well, are depleting over time. The reserve life index measures how long reserves would last at the current production rate if there were no additions to reserves. In this study, we examine the time series behavior of the reserve life index for each of the twelve onshore oil producing districts in Texas. Specifically, we model the relationship between reserve life and the real price of oil within a nonlinear ARDL framework. Among the results, we find evidence of both long-run and short-run asymmetries in the response of reserve life to increases/decreases in real oil prices. Further, the magnitude of the effect is greater for positive changes in real oil prices than for negative changes in real oil prices. The findings are important to operators, investors and policymakers interested in sustainability.
    • Old Wine in a New Bottle: Growth Convergence Dynamics in the EU

      Apergis, Nicholas; University of Piraeus (Springer, 2010-06)
      In this paper, we explore convergence of real per capita output across the European Union (EU) countries, as well as the transitional behavior of possible underlying factors that are responsible for any convergence or divergence pattern. The new panel convergence methodology developed by Phillips and Sul (2007) is employed in a production function growth accounting approach and data from the Total Economy Database and the Total Economy Growth Accounting Database. The empirical findings suggest that the EU countries form two distinct convergent clubs, exhibiting considerable heterogeneity in the underlying growth factors. These findings should help policy makers in designing appropriate growth-oriented programs as well as in setting priorities in their implementation.
    • Older people's experiences of their kitchens: 2000 to 2010

      Sims, Ruth; Maguire, Martin C.; Nicolle, Colette; Marshall, Russell; Lawton, Clare; Peace, Sheila; Percival, John (2013-07-12)
      Purpose – This paper aims to present the quantitative results based on a comparison and evaluation of older people's experiences, needs and wants from their current kitchens, combining and comparing the results obtained from two studies conducted in 2000 and 2010 to see what progress has been made. Design/methodology/approach – A study in 2010 investigated the life-long and contemporary experiences of kitchens of 48 people aged over 60 years of age. The research included detailed questionnaire interviews asking people about their experiences of living in their current kitchen. A previous study, conducted in 2000, asked many of the same questions of 22 people in the same age group. Findings – By combining and comparing the two sets of data it seems that only limited progress has been made in terms of kitchen design meeting the needs of older people between 2000 and 2010. Research limitations/implications – Owing to the small sizes of the samples it is not possible to compare the figures statistically or present them as fully representative of the British older population but while the two samples are limited both had similar characteristics of age and gender, so differences do show potential trends over time. Practical implications – The research refers to guidance and a computer based design tool and identifies a number of practical implications for design. Social implications – As people age their abilities and needs can change and their kitchen may no longer be as accessible or appropriate to their needs. Originality/value – This paper adds to the relevant guidance for designers, developers and managers of buildings where the continued personal use of a kitchen is important for continuing independence of older people.
    • Older people's experiences of their kitchens: dishes and wishes.

      Sims, Ruth; Marshall, Russell; Maguire, Martin C.; Nicolle, Colette; Lawton, Clare; Pearce, S.; Percival, John; Loughborough University (2011)
      A new study is investigating the life-long and contemporary experiences of kitchens of 48 people over 60 years of age. The research includes detailed questionnaire interviews asking people about their experiences of living in their current kitchen. This paper presents the initial quantitative results of peoples’ experiences, needs and wants from their current kitchens. This includes problems experienced with activities of daily life in the current kitchen, changes that have been made or are planned to be made to the current kitchen to increase usability in older age, coping strategies and examples of design that have been found to be really useful to older people.
    • Olivia Dunham and the new frontier in fringe

      Forde, Teresa; University of Derby (McFarland, 2019-07-12)
      From the Star Wars expanded universe to Westworld, the science fiction western has captivated audiences for more than fifty years. These twelve new essays concentrate on the female characters in the contemporary science fiction western, addressing themes of power, agency, intersectionality and the body. Discussing popular works such as Fringe, Guardians of the Galaxy and Mass Effect, the essayists shed new light on the gender dynamics of these beloved franchises, emphasizing inclusion and diversity with their critical perspectives.
    • On the causal dynamics between emissions, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and economic growth

      Apergis, Nicholas; Payne, James; Menyah, Kojo; Wolde-Rufael, Yemane; University of Piraeus; Illinois State University; London Metropolitan University; Private (Elsevier, 2010-09-15)
      This paper examines the causal relationship between CO2 emissions, nuclear energy consumption, renewable energy consumption, and economic growth for a group of 19 developed and developing countries for the period 1984–2007 using a panel error correction model. The long-run estimates indicate that there is a statistically significant negative association between nuclear energy consumption and emissions, but a statistically significant positive relationship between emissions and renewable energy consumption. The results from the panel Granger causality tests suggest that in the short-run nuclear energy consumption plays an important role in reducing CO2 emissions whereas renewable energy consumption does not contribute to reductions in emissions. This may be due to the lack of adequate storage technology to overcome intermittent supply problems as a result electricity producers have to rely on emission generating energy sources to meet peak load demand.
    • On the causal dynamics between renewable and non-renewable energy consumption and economic growth in developed and developing countries

      Apergis, Nicholas; Payne, James; University of Piraeus; University of South Florida Polytechnic (Springer, 2011-11)
      This study extends recent work on the relationship between renewable and non-renewable energy consumption and economic growth to the case of developed and developing countries over the period 1990–2007. Heterogeneous panel cointegration procedures show a long-run equilibrium relationship between real GDP, renewable energy consumption, non-renewable energy consumption, real gross fixed capital formation, and the labor force with the respective coefficient estimates positive and statistically significant for developed and developing country panels. The results from the panel error correction models reveal bidirectional causality between renewable and non-renewable energy consumption and economic growth in the short- and long-run for each country panel.
    • On the dynamics of poverty and income inequality in US states

      Apergis, Nicholas; Dincer, Oguzhan; Payne, James; University of Piraeus; Illinois State University; Illinois State University (Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2011)
      This study seeks to provide answers to the following questions: Is there a relationship between poverty and income inequality in the short run/long run? Is the relationship unidirectional from income inequality to poverty as the previous studies assume, or is it bidirectional? The paper investigates the causality between income inequality and poverty within a multivariate framework using a panel data set of 50 US states over the period 1980 to 2004. The results reveal that a bidirectional relationship exists between poverty and income inequality both in the short run and in the long run. With respect to the short‐run dynamics associated with poverty, both income inequality and the unemployment rate have a positive and statistically significant impact on poverty, a negative and statistically significant impact for real per capita personal income and level of education, while corruption is insignificant. In terms of the short‐run dynamics associated with income inequality, poverty, the unemployment rate, real per capita personal income, and the level of education have a positive and statistically significant impact, while corruption has a statistically insignificant impact on income inequality. With regard to the long‐run dynamics, the statistically significant error correction terms indicate the presence of a feedback relationship between poverty and income inequality.
    • On the importance of the microbiome and pathobiome in coral health and disease

      Sweet, Michael J.; Bulling, Mark T.; University of Derby (Frontiers, 2017-01-20)
      The term “microbiome” was first coined in 1988 and given the definition of a characteristic microbial community occupying a reasonably well defined habitat which has distinct physio-chemical properties. A more recent term has also emerged, taking this one step further and focusing on diseases in host organisms. The “pathobiome” breaks down the concept of “one pathogen = one disease” and highlights the role of the microbiome, more specifically certain members within the microbiome, in causing pathogenesis. The development of next generation sequencing has allowed large data sets to be amassed describing the microbial communities of many organisms and the field of coral biology is no exception. However, the choices made in the analytical process and the interpretation of these data can significantly affect the outcome and the overall conclusions drawn. In this review we explore the implications of these difficulties, as well as highlighting analytical tools developed in other research fields (such as network analysis) which hold substantial potential in helping to develop a deeper understanding of the role of the microbiome in disease in corals. We also make the case that standardization of methods will substantially improve the collective gain in knowledge across research groups.
    • On the perceptual advantage of stereo subwoofer systems in live sound reinforcement

      Hill, Adam J.; Hawksford, Malcolm O. J.; University of Derby; University of Essex (Audio Engineering Society, 2013-10)
      Recent research into low-frequency sound-source localization confirms the lowest localizable frequency is a function of room dimensions, source/listener location and reverberant characteristics of the space. Larger spaces therefore facilitate accurate low-frequency localization and should gain benefit from broadband multichannel live-sound reproduction compared to the current trend of deriving an auxiliary mono signal for the subwoofers. This study explores whether the monophonic approach is a significant limit to perceptual quality and if stereo subwoofer systems can create a superior soundscape. The investigation combines binaural measurements and a series of listening tests to compare mono and stereo subwoofer systems when used within a typical left/right configuration.
    • One thousand good things in Nature: aspects of nearby Nature associated with improved connection to Nature

      Richardson, Miles; Hallam, Jenny; Lumber, Ryan; University of Derby (2015-10-01)
      As our interactions with nature occur increasingly within urban landscapes, there is a need to consider how ‘mundane nature’ can be valued as a route for people to connect to nature. The content of a three good things in nature intervention, written by 65 participants each day for five days is analysed. Content analysis produced themes related to sensations, temporal change, active wildlife, beauty, weather, colour, good feelings and specific aspects of nature. The themes describe the everyday good things in nature, providing direction for those seeking to frame engaging conservation messages, plan urban spaces and connect people with nearby nature.