• Narcissism, social anxiety and self-presentation in exercise.

      Akehurst, Sally; Thatcher, Joanne; Aberystwyth University (Elsevier, 2010-04-10)
      In an exercise setting where impression motivation might be high but self-presentation efficacy low, social anxiety is likely to occur (Schlenker & Leary, 1982). Narcissism is, however, associated with low anxiety, high confidence, and a keenness for social evaluation (Wallace, Baumeister, & Vohs, 2005) and therefore may protect exercisers from social anxiety. One hundred and sixty undergraduates (88 males and 72 females; Mage = 20.45 years, SD = 2.49 years) completed measures of narcissism, social anxiety, and self-presentation in exercise. In females, narcissism moderated the impression motivation/construction– social anxiety relationships. Findings extend our understanding of the self-presentational processes involved in exercise and, specifically, how narcissism protects individuals from experiencing high social anxiety.
    • Narratives of catastrophe

      Fisher, Craig; Stratford, Helen; University for the Creative Arts (2015)
      ‘Standardized Versions’ is a collaborative project between artist Craig Fisher and artist/architect Helen Stratford that takes as its starting point the idea that representations of scenes of disaster are based on standard types. There are always repeated elements: shards of timber, an upturned car, papers, barricades and piles of rubble. What if these elements were all deliberately and carefully placed to give the appearance that they had been assembled in an apparently random manner? Perhaps selected from a ‘Catalogue of Catastrophe’® with accompanying instructions and specification on their construction and placement? Fisher and Stratford are engaged in examining how representations of disaster and destruction are mediated for our consumption. Fisher and Stratford’s ‘Standardised Versions (Rubble)’ presents Standardised Rubble through a typology of paper objects, 3D drawings and a plan, with means of assembly, associated specification and the technical equipment necessary, the very precise measuring stick (VPM®). Employing humour, the drawings/objects play with and subvert the language of architectural conventions, typologies, plans and written specifications, to provide a set of instructions to reconstruct (through live performances) that, which has the appearance of having been deconstructed. Fisher and Stratford have been commissioned by Bloc Projects, Sheffield (2016) to present Standardized Versions (Rubble) within the public realm as a billboard. This enables Fisher and Stratford to consider further how representations of ‘ disaster, aftermath and wreckage’ become flattened and consumed through its mediation in the media.
    • National Careers Council, an aspirational nation: creating a culture change in careers provision; Careers England Policy Commentary 21

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Careers England, 2013-06-10)
      This is the twenty-first in an occasional series of briefing notes on key policy documents related to the future of career guidance services in England. The policy commentary has been prepared for Careers England by Dr Tristram Hooley (Reader in Career Development and Head of the International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby); the views expressed are those of the writer.
    • National guidelines and your continuing professional development

      Bryson, David; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2020-01-23)
      There are several links between the national guidelines produced by the Institute of Medical Illustrators (IMI), the development of evidence-based practice and continuing professional development (CPD). This includes their development, research and testing in practice, their use either to support the development of best practice or their direct implementation. This paper suggests a number of ways to engage with the guidelines to support your professional learning and CPD.
    • Natural disasters and housing prices: Fresh evidence from a global country sample

      Apergis, Nicholas; University of Derby (Asian Real Estate Society, 2020)
      Given that the literature on the impact of natural disasters on house prices is highly limited, this paper combines data on natural disasters and house prices from 117 countries, spanning the period 2000-2018 and a panel regression method to estimate the effects of natural disasters on house prices. The findings document that natural disasters lead to lower house prices, with the results surviving a number of robustness tests. When examining the impacts of natural disasters by type, the findings highlight that geological disasters exert the strongest (negative) impact on house prices. The results also illustrate the negative impact of those disasters on house prices when the distinction between small and large disasters is also accounted. The findings provide important implications for policymakers and property investors. Lower house prices in countries experience natural disasters events could significantly signify lower consumption and investment (the wealth effect), with further negative spillovers to the real economy. Economic policymakers could implement low-tax policies or quantitative easing schemes to support these areas/countries. The findings exemplify the need of governments and policymakers to mitigate climate change effects on housing by adopting new, more environmentally friendly technologies and energy sources.
    • Nature Connections

      Jinks, Cameron; University of Derby (2015-09)
      The highlands are now relatively empty with only about 20% of Scotland’s population living in the region, looking at the bleakness of the landscape it is easy to imagine that this was always the case. However, some of the sites I photograph, Aoneadh Mor for example, were forcibly cleared of their tenant farmers in the nineteenth century to make way for more profitable sheep. The result of these, often brutal, ‘clearances’ was a reduction in the population from about 50% of Scotland’s total to 20%. Mary Cameron's eyewitness account of Aoneadh Mor's forced evictions reached a rapt British readership via the magazine "Good Words", and had an enormous impact on developing unease at what had been done in the name of progress. "The hissing of the fire on the flag of the hearth as they were drowning it reach my heart", she said, "The aged woman, the mother of my husband was then alive, weak and lame. James carried her on his back, in a creel." On the ridge of Sithean na Raiplach, refugees destined for Glasgow and the colonies turned for a last look. "The houses were already stripped. The bleat of the big sheep was on the mountain." Aoneadh Mor, the village of the Cameron highlanders, was cleared to make way for sheep.
    • Nature contact, nature connectedness and associations with health, wellbeing and pro-environmental behaviours

      White, Mathew P.; Hunt, Anne; Richardson, Miles; Pahl, Sabine; Burt, Jim; University of Plymouth; University of Exeter; Natural England, UK; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2020-01-18)
    • The nature of practitioner research: critical distance, power and ethics

      Appleby, Michelle; University of Derby (University of Cumbria, 2013-10)
      Researching within one’s place of practice allows the researcher to have the unique position of knowing the participants and the research context. The relationship the participants have with the researcher will impact upon the disclosure of information differently than research conducted by someone outside the area of practice. This can be a benefit and a drawback for the participants, the area of practice and the researcher. However, as is demonstrated within this paper, the role the researcher adopts throughout the process of gathering information is not always clear. As a student on the Doctorate of Education programme myself, the nature of practitioner research and the complexities of this type of research is of great interest to me. Beginning to develop my own research project through this taught programme has allowed an opportunity to think through these challenges and wrestle with the complexity and contradiction, dilemma and incongruity which emerges from being a researching practitioner. Within this piece it is suggested that these quandaries can be considered from the perspective of critical distance, relationships and power and ethical considerations. The idea of considering these conflicts reflexively will be explored here. Although this discussion was not based on empirical research findings as such, it is anticipated that this piece will further the understanding of practitioner research in higher education from the position of being a student and through scholastic analysis of the Ed D programme providing a particular perspective on the nature of research.
    • Nature: a new paradigm for well-being and ergonomics

      Richardson, Miles; Maspero, Marta; Golightly, David; Sheffield, David; Staples, Vicki; Lumber, Ryan; University of Derby; University of Nottingham (2016-03-22)
      Nature is presented as a new paradigm for ergonomics. As a discipline concerned with well-being, the importance of natural environments for wellness should be part of ergonomics knowledge and practice. This position is supported by providing a concise summary of the evidence of the value of the natural environment to well-being. Further, an emerging body of research has found relationships between well-being and a connection to nature, a concept that reveals the integrative character of human experience which can inform wider practice and epistemology in ergonomics. Practitioners are encouraged to bring nature into the workplace, so that ergonomics keeps pace with the move to nature-based solutions, but also as a necessity in the current ecological and social context.
    • Negations in syllogistic reasoning: Evidence for a heuristic–analytic conflict

      Stupple, Edward J. N.; Waterhouse, Eleanor F.; University of Derby (2009-08)
      An experiment utilizing response time measures was conducted to test dominant processing strategies in syllogistic reasoning with the expanded quantifier set proposed by Roberts (2005). Through adding negations to existing quantifiers it is possible to change problem surface features without altering logical validity. Biases based on surface features such as atmosphere, matching, and the probability heuristics model (PHM; Chater & Oaksford, 1999; Wetherick & Gilhooly, 1995) would not be expected to show variance in response latencies, but participant responses should be highly sensitive to changes in the surface features of the quantifiers. In contrast, according to analytic accounts such as mental models theory and mental logic (e.g., Johnson-Laird & Byrne, 1991; Rips, 1994) participants should exhibit increased response times for negated premises, but not be overly impacted upon by the surface features of the conclusion. Data indicated that the dominant response strategy was based on a matching heuristic, but also provided evidence of a resource-demanding analytic procedure for dealing with double negatives. The authors propose that dual-process theories offer a stronger account of these data whereby participants employ competing heuristic and analytic strategies and fall back on a heuristic response when analytic processing fails.
    • Negotiating in the world of mixed beliefs and value systems: A compassion-focused model

      Gilbert, Paul; University of Derby (Springer, 2014-11-11)
      In a world of increasing conflicts, over a variety of resources, and with a need for humans to work together to solve common problems, the area of international negotiations is central to these endeavours. This chapter will argue that conflict and conflict resolution can be understood against an evolutionary framework which helps us understand why the human brain is capable of producing highly destructive and conflictual behaviours. This approach opens up new ways of considering the challenges that face international negotiators. This chapter will also argue that although our brain has many destructive potentials, it also has a capacity for altruism, cooperation and compassion. If we learn to cultivate our minds from these qualities, along with mindfulness, this may help negotiators find new ways of negotiating and working with their own complex psychologies.
    • The neural correlates of belief-bias inhibition: The impact of logic training

      Luo, Junlong; Tang, Xiaochen; Zhang, Entao; Stupple, Edward J. N.; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2014-09-27)
      Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) was used to investigate the brain activity associated with response change in a belief bias paradigm before and after logic training. Participants completed two sets of belief biased reasoning tasks. In the first set they were instructed to respond based on their empirical beliefs, and in the second – following logic training – they were instructed to respond logically. The comparison between conflict problems in the second scan versus in the first scan revealed differing activation for the left inferior frontal gyrus, left middle frontal gyrus, cerebellum, and precuneus. The scan was time locked to the presentation of the minor premise, and thus demonstrated effects of belief–logic conflict on neural activation earlier in the time course than has previously been shown in fMRI. These data, moreover, indicated that logical training results in changes in brain activity associated with cognitive control processing.
    • Neural networks engaged in short-term memory rehearsal are disrupted by irrelevant speech in human subjects

      Kopp, Franziska; Schröger, Erich; Lipka, Sigrid (2004)
      Rehearsal mechanisms in human short-term memory are increasingly understood in the light of both behavioural and neuroanatomical findings. However, little is known about the cooperation of participating brain structures and how such cooperations are affected when memory performance is disrupted. In this paper we use EEG coherence as a measure of synchronization to investigate rehearsal processes and their disruption by irrelevant speech in a delayed serial recall paradigm. Fronto-central and fronto-parietal theta (4–7.5 Hz), beta (13–20 Hz), and gamma (35–47 Hz) synchronizations are shown to be involved in our short-term memory task. Moreover, the impairment in serial recall due to irrelevant speech was preceded by a reduction of gamma band coherence. Results suggest that the irrelevant speech effect has its neural basis in the disruption of left-lateralized fronto-central networks. This stresses the importance of gamma band activity for short-term memory operations.
    • The neurophysiological relationship between number anxiety and the EEG gamma-band

      Baker, Ian; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2020-06-11)
      The development of math anxiety is thought to originate at a young age, as a form of number anxiety, but has not been investigated extensively. Research has shown greater levels of EEG gamma-band activity are experienced during threat perception and attentional bias. This has been identified in high math anxious individuals when confronted with math-based tasks, but has not yet been explored for number anxiety specifically. Single-digit numbers and letters were presented to 15 high and 15 low math anxious participants, who were required to observe the stimuli. High math anxious participants displayed significantly greater levels of gamma activity during number observation compared to letter observation. Findings suggest high math anxious individuals may have a threat-related response to observation of simple numerical stimuli. Further behavioural investigations are needed, but high math anxious individuals may display avoidance towards number and math due to a threat response associated with increased gamma activity.
    • The new apothecary's cabinet II

      White, Christine; Oddey, Alison; University of Derby; Nottingham Trent University (2015-09-11)
      The new apothecary's cabinet II. Nature Connections Festival and Exhibition, Markeaton Gallery, University of Derby, Derby, 11 September 2015 - 29 January 2016
    • A new career in higher education careers work.

      Neary, Siobhan; Hanson, Jill; University of Derby (Routledge, 2018-07-26)
      Neary and Hanson’s chapter reports on research conducted with the HE career development workforce and focusses on careers advisers who have moved into the field within the last five years. Their research illustrates a highly dedicated and satisfied workforce demonstrating a strong set of values. Predominantly, most have moved from other roles in education/higher education or HR and recruitment. They raise questions about the highly gendered nature of careers work which is dominated by women; as they suggest, unsurprisingly given how many caring jobs are still associated with a female workforce. Their chapter supports what Thambar reports in her chapter about the dedicated nature of careers advisers.
    • New disease outbreak affects two dominant sea urchin species associated with Australian temperate reefs

      Sweet, Michael J.; Bulling, Mark T.; Williamson, Jane E.; University of Derby (2016-06-09)
      Diseases of sea urchins have been implicated in dramatic transitions of marine ecosystems. Although no definitive causal agent has been found for many of these outbreaks, mostare hypothesised to be waterborne and bacterial. Here we show the first report of a novel diseaseaffecting at least 2 species of urchins off the south-eastern coast of Australia. The aetiologicalagent, identified via a range of molecular techniques, immuno-histology and inoculation experi-ments, was found to be the opportunistic pathogen Vibrio anguillarum . The disease appears to betemperature-dependent, with a faster transmission rate and increase in prevalence during ex -perimental trials conducted at higher temperatures. Furthermore, analysis of long-term field datasuggests that it may have already reached epidemic proportions. With the increases in ocean temperatures brought about by climate change, this novel urchin disease may pose a severe problem for the organisms associated with the temperate reefs off Australia and/or the ecosystemas a whole.
    • New evidence on the ability of asset prices and real economic activity forecast errors to predict inflation forecast errors.

      Apergis, Nicholas; University of Piraeus (Wiley, 2016-11-16)
      This paper investigates the impact of both asset and macroeconomic forecast errors on inflation forecast errors in the USA by making use of a two‐regime model. The findings document a significant contribution of both types of forecast errors to the explanation of inflation forecast errors, with the pass‐through being stronger when these errors move within the high‐volatility regime.
    • New Evidence on the Information and Predictive Content of the Baltic Dry Index

      Apergis, Nicholas; Payne, James; University of Piraeus; University of New Orleans (MDPI, 2013-07-24)
      This empirical study analyzes the information and predictive content of the Baltic Dry Index (BDI) with respect to a range of financial assets and the macroeconomy. By using panel methodological approaches and daily data spanning the period 1985–2012, the empirical analysis documents the joint predictability capacity of the BDI for both financial assets and industrial production. The results reveal the role of the BDI in predicting the future course of the real economy, yielding a link between financial asset markets and the macroeconomy.
    • A New Gentleness: Effective Ficto-Regionality

      Campbell, Neil; University of Derby (University of Nebraska Press, 2018-11-01)
      Using affective critical regionality to enable a re-valuing of the local as a powerful means to appreciate the everyday and the overlooked as vital elements within a more inclusive understanding of how we live.