• M11 A randomised controlled feasibility trial of a physical activity behaviour change intervention compared to social interaction in huntington’s disease.

      Busse, Monica; Quinn, Lori; Drew, Cheney; Kelson, Mark; Trubey, Rob; McEwan, Kirsten; Jones, Carys; Townson, Julia; Dawes, Helen; Tudor-Edwards, Rhiannon; et al. (BMJ Publishing Group Ltd., 2016-09-13)
      Background Regular physical activity has health benefits for people with Huntington’s disease (HD), however consistent engagement is challenging. We report the results of a single blind, multi-site, randomised controlled feasibility trial of a physical activity intervention in HD. Methods Participants were randomly assigned to physical activity or social contact control interventions. The primary outcome was feasibility. Short-term benefit was assessed with the Physical Performance Test (PPT), a measure of functional ability. A range of exploratory outcomes including home and community mobility (Life Space), self-efficacy (Lorig), physical activity (International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ)), as well as disease-specific measures of motor and cognitive function were evaluated. Intervention fidelity and delivery costs were established. The trial was registered (ISRCTN 65378754 (13/03/2014)). Results We recruited 46 people with HD; 22 were randomised to the physical intervention (n = 16 analysed); 24 to social contact (n = 22 analysed). Retention, fidelity and adherence met pre-determined criteria. IPAQ scores in the physical intervention group were 142% higher (1.42; 95% CI: [−22%%, 653%]); and self-efficacy for exercise (1.6; 95% CI: [0.6, 2.7]) was also higher. Life Space scores were 12 points different between groups; 95% CI: [−2, 27]. Cognitive function was better in the physical intervention group with 2·9 more correct responses (95% CI: [0.01, 5.9]) on the Symbol Digit Modality test. There were no differences in other exploratory outcome measures and in particular no between-group differences in the PPT (treatment effect: 0.3, 95% CI: [−2.1, 2.7]). Mean (SD) physical intervention per session cost was £56.97 (£34.72). Conclusion A physical activity coaching intervention is feasible, can improve self-efficacy, physical activity behaviours and cognitive function in people with HD and represents excellent value for money in a devastating disease.
    • Macroeconomic rationality and Lucas’ misperceptions model: further evidence from 41 countries.

      Apergis, Nicholas; Miller, Stephen; University of Macedonia; University of Nevada Las Vegas (Elsevier, 2004-03-27)
      Several researchers have examined Lucas’ misperceptions model as well as various propositions derived from it within a cross-section empirical framework. The cross-section approach imposes a single monetary policy regime for the entire period. Our paper innovates on existing tests of those rational expectations propositions by allowing the simultaneous effect of monetary and short-run aggregate supply (oil price) shocks on output behavior and the employment of advanced panel econometric techniques. Our empirical findings, for a sample of 41 countries over 1949–1999, provide evidence in favor of the majority of rational expectations propositions.
    • Madagascar's escape from Africa: A high-resolution plate reconstruction for the Western Somali Basin and implications for supercontinent dispersal

      Phethean, Jordan; Kalnins, Lara M.; van Hunen, Jeroen; Biffi, Paolo G.; Davies, Richard J.; McCaffrey, Ken J.W.; Durham University; University of Edinburgh; S.G.E.G ENI, Milan, Italy; Newcastle University (American Geophysical Union (AGU), 2016-12-29)
      Accurate reconstructions of the dispersal of supercontinent blocks are essential for testing continental breakup models. Here, we provide a new plate tectonic reconstruction of the opening of the Western Somali Basin during the breakup of East and West Gondwana. The model is constrained by a new comprehensive set of spreading lineaments, detected in this heavily sedimented basin using a novel technique based on directional derivatives of free‐air gravity anomalies. Vertical gravity gradient and free‐air gravity anomaly maps also enable the detection of extinct mid‐ocean ridge segments, which can be directly compared to several previous ocean magnetic anomaly interpretations of the Western Somali Basin. The best matching interpretations have basin symmetry around the M0 anomaly; these are then used to temporally constrain our plate tectonic reconstruction. The reconstruction supports a tight fit for Gondwana fragments prior to breakup, and predicts that the continent‐ocean transform margin lies along the Rovuma Basin, not along the Davie Fracture Zone (DFZ) as commonly thought. According to our reconstruction, the DFZ represents a major ocean‐ocean fracture zone formed by the coalescence of several smaller fracture zones during evolving plate motions as Madagascar drifted southwards, and offshore Tanzania is an obliquely rifted, rather than transform, margin. New seismic reflection evidence for oceanic crust inboard of the DFZ strongly supports these conclusions. Our results provide important new constraints on the still enigmatic driving mechanism of continental rifting, the nature of the lithosphere in the Western Somali Basin, and its resource potential.
    • Maintaining natural spawning timing in Acropora corals following long distance inter-continental transportation.

      Craggs, Jamie; Guest, James R.; Brett, Aaron; Davis, Michelle; Sweet, Michael J.; University of Derby; Horniman Museum and Gardens; Newcastle University; SECORE Internationa; S.E.A Aquarium (European Association of Zoos and Aquaria, 2018-04-30)
      The majority of research focusing on coral reproductive biology (e.g. spawning timing and synchrony) is carried out in facilities adjacent to reefs that the corals originated from. This is in part because transporting corals for long distances by air leads to sub-lethal stress that may confound the results of any experimental study. However, these constraints often mean research associated with coral reproductive timing is restricted to relatively few locations. To assess the potential for studying environmental drivers of spawning timing in corals in captivity (defined here as ex situ closed aquaria), we aimed to transport 14 large (16-37 cm) Acropora hyacinthus colonies from reefs in Singapore to a closed aquarium system in London (a journey time of ~34 hours). Collection was purposefully timed to occur just before the predicted annual mass spawning event and on the day of transportation it was noted that 12 of the 14 corals contained large visible oocytes. The ‘inverted submersion method’ was applied and the water used for transport was buffered to ensure the colonies remained healthy throughout their travel time. At the end location all colonies were placed into a purpose built aquarium research system which allowed for the approximation of the environmental conditions found on the fringing reefs south of Singapore (the original location). While three colonies appeared partially bleached (visibly pale) and one colony suffered from partial tissue loss, all colonies (i.e. 100% of those collected) were still alive at the time of writing (28 months post collection). More importantly, all corals that were gravid at the time of collection spawned ex situ within the same lunar month as those in the wild (within 3-4 nights of each other). This paper describes the procedures for carrying out long distance transportation of large gravid broadcast spawning coral colonies from reef sites to public aquariums or research facilities around the world for the purpose of ex situ spawning research.
    • Maintaining natural spawning timing in Acropora corals following long distance inter-continental transportation.

      Craggs, Jamie; Guest, James R.; Brett, Aaron; Davis, Michelle; Sweet, Michael J.; University of Derby; Horniman Museum and Gardens; Newcastle University; SECORE International, Inc.; Resorts World Sentosa (European Association of Zoos and Aquaria, 2018-04-29)
      The majority of research focusing on coral reproductive biology (e.g. spawning timing and synchrony) is carried out in facilities adjacent to reefs that the corals originated from. This is in part because transporting corals for long distances by air leads to sub-lethal stress that may confound the results of any experimental study. However, these constraints often mean research associated with coral reproductive timing is restricted to relatively few locations. To assess the potential for studying environmental drivers of spawning timing in corals in captivity (defined here as ex situ closed aquaria), we aimed to transport 14 large (16-37 cm) Acropora hyacinthus colonies from reefs in Singapore to a closed aquarium system in London (a journey time of ~34 hours). Collection was purposefully timed to occur just before the predicted annual mass spawning event and on the day of transportation it was noted that 12 of the 14 corals contained large visible oocytes. The ‘inverted submersion method’ was applied and the water used for transport was buffered to ensure the colonies remained healthy throughout their travel time. At the end location all colonies were placed into a purpose built aquarium research system which allowed for the approximation of the environmental conditions found on the fringing reefs south of Singapore (the original location). While three colonies appeared partially bleached (visibly pale) and one colony suffered from partial tissue loss, all colonies (i.e. 100% of those collected) were still alive at the time of writing (28 months post collection). More importantly, all corals that were gravid at the time of collection spawned ex situ within the same lunar month as those in the wild (within 3-4 nights of each other). This paper describes the procedures for carrying out long distance transportation of large gravid broadcast spawning coral colonies from reef sites to public aquariums or research facilities around the world for the purpose of ex situ spawning research.
    • Major evolutionary transitions of life, metabolic scaling and the number and size of mitochondria and chloroplasts.

      Okie, J.; Smith, V.; Martin-Cereceda, M; University of Kansas, USA; University of Madrid, Spain; Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA (The Royal Society Publishing, 2016-05-25)
      We investigate the effects of trophic lifestyle and two types of major evolutionary transitions in individuality—the endosymbiotic acquisition of organelles and development of multicellularity—on organellar and cellular metabolism and allometry. We develop a quantitative framework linking the size and metabolic scaling of eukaryotic cells to the abundance, size and metabolic scaling of mitochondria and chloroplasts and analyse a newly compiled, unprecedented database representing unicellular and multicellular cells covering diverse phyla and tissues. Irrespective of cellularity, numbers and total volumes of mitochondria scale linearly with cell volume, whereas chloroplasts scale sublinearly and sizes of both organelles remain largely invariant with cell size. Our framework allows us to estimate the metabolic scaling exponents of organelles and cells. Photoautotrophic cells and organelles exhibit photosynthetic scaling exponents always less than one, whereas chemoheterotrophic cells and organelles have steeper respiratory scaling exponents close to one. Multicellularity has no discernible effect on the metabolic scaling of organelles and cells. In contrast, trophic lifestyle has a profound and uniform effect, and our results suggest that endosymbiosis fundamentally altered the metabolic scaling of free-living bacterial ancestors of mitochondria and chloroplasts, from steep ancestral scaling to a shallower scaling in their endosymbiotic descendants.
    • Making a rock

      Locke, Caroline; Swann, Debra; University of Derby; The Academy in Antwerp; Nottingham Trent University (N/A, 16/03/2016)
      Making A Rock is Collaborative Research with Debra Swann. This collaboration has developed through a series of residencies at Primary, Nottingham and Sumer lodge Nottingham Trent University 2016. Our first exhibition was in Antwerp, Belgium, at Collective National Gallery in 2016 (Collective National was founded by Janna Beck, Lecturer at The Academy in Antwerp) and then an exhibition at Primary, Nottingham 2017. Making a Rock’ is an ongoing durational performance that attends to the physical construction of a large-scale object (a cardboard ‘rock’) embracing the potential of duration, temporality, liveness and performativity. Using photography, video and sound to document this process of making, the enquiry expands the vocabulary of sculptural practice through the focus of the durational aspects of making and the idea of the sculptural work in flux. This practice-based enquiry has developed from working collaboratively with Debra Swann(Artist and Lecturer at Nottingham Trent University) since January 2016. This enquiry explores the process of making and collecting data. It investigates how we understand objects and sound and the properties and qualities they possess. Through the artist/object relationship a focus on the evolution of an object and the artist’s process is examined. Rock Music is a composition created using sounds taken from recordings of the artist Debra Swann making a huge cardboard rock. We have been exploring the different kinds of data we can gather from our artistic practice. We extract the data and rework it in live performances and exhibited works. Rock Music explores sound in relation to domestic and labour intensive activity. The composition is cut onto a vinyl record which is played over and over within the exhibition space. The sound of the activity becomes abstract and otherworldly when amplified. Mundane working involves repetition – a strange rhythm develops – a kind of chant. We have developed performances and exhibited at Collectiv National Gallery, Antwerp, Belgium in 2016 and at Primary, Nottingham in 2017 . This research has given us substantial material to support applications to higher profile institutions and public spaces.
    • Making meaning and meaning making: memory, postmemory and narrative in Holocaust literature

      Flower, Annie; University of Derby (2013)
      This paper explores links between narration and memory in Holocaust literature and examines ways in which individuals construct memory and postmemory. Based on the premise that ‘All authors mediate reality through their writing...’ and taking into consideration that what we remember and how we remember is likely to have a significant impact on the narratives that we construct, this article considers the reliability of memory. It argues that whilst there is, at times, a blurring of boundaries between fact and fiction in Holocaust literature, this has little or no impact on the validity and authenticity of the narratives. In an attempt to address these issues more fully, this paper explores the notions of making meaning and meaning making, whilst considering the effects of positionality, time and trauma on memory. Key texts referred to in this discussion include Night (1958) by Elie Wiesel, All Rivers Run to the Sea (1996) by Elie Wiesel, In My Brother’s Shadow (2005) by Uwe Timm and The Dark Room (2001) by Rachel Seiffert. These texts have been chosen in order to highlight the subjectivity of memory and postmemory and to demonstrate the role that narrative plays in their construction and representation.
    • Making projects sing: a musical perspective of project management

      Wilson, Chris; Sivaraman, R; Brown, Michael; McCormack, Danny; Business Expert Press (Business Expert Press, 2016)
      This book explores project management (PM) from a musical perspective. Seeking ways of understanding PM in musical ways, distinctive approaches to the management of risk, experimentation, the conception and practice of teams, and the realization of imagination, are explored to highlight both the synergies and distinctions between musical practice and project management in the wider corporate and industrial sectors. The intention being to surface insights of value, capable of adaptation and practical application in a range of contexts, a series of conceptual models and thinking exercises are presented, each designed to structure a more musical approach to project management and capable of application at every scale of project management, and every possible project management environment. The contention of this book is that music provides an interesting context through which to consider project management practice, and therefore a unique opportunity to approach project management from both a different viewpoint and a different mindset. Music is a vibrant field of activity incorporating distinctive approaches to the development and maintenance of expertise, the transfer of knowledge, and the realization of remarkable cultural creativity. Synergies between musical practice and the wider project management profession are many and varied, and more musical approaches to project management may not only be possible, but may also be an engaging means of developing creativity in project outcomes.
    • Making shaking shifting pouring sawing.

      Locke, Caroline; Swann, Debra; University of Derby; The Academy in Antwerp; Nottingham Trent University (Primary Studios Nottingham, 2017-02)
      Making Shaking Shifting Pouring Sawing is an investigation that explores the idea of repeated and intensive labour in relation to artistic and domestic process. The work features cyclical movement, made and found objects, sound, data, video, animation and live performance. This collaborative research with Debra Swann has developed through a series of residencies at Primary, Nottingham and Summer lodge at Nottingham Trent University 2016. Our first exhibition was in Antwerp, Belgium, at Collective National Gallery in 2016 (Collective National was founded by Janna Beck, Lecturer at The Academy in Antwerp) and then an exhibition at Primary, Nottingham 2017 Through collaborative fieldwork we have developed a number of performances and objects around the themes of repeated or iterative labour in relation to the artistic process. Objects perform; we make, we operate, we facilitate or manage and we gather data. Through durational live performances and events an audience can experience the work and its temporal quality. We document the tasks we undertake and collect data/material from objects whilst exploring processes through repetitive tasks, systems or routines. This is reinvested into the work, by way of sound, image or video creating an ongoing process. There is a play between the hand made and the machine, the analogue and the digital.
    • Making use of icould: learning from practice

      Moore, Nicki; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby, iCeGS (2015-03-30)
      icould, is an online careers resource which provides individual’s with access to the work and life experiences of hundreds of people in the form of online careers films. The films are supplemented with labour market information and other resources. This approach seeks to provide both a self-directed resource for career explorers and a resource that can be used by career and education professionals to enhance their practice. In addition, icould provides a range of information, games, interactive activities and other resources that can also be used either directly by a career explorer or as underpinning resources for professionals working in the field. icould is a technically innovative product which utilises multi-media content, interactivity and social media in new ways to provide career support. icould has become popular with career professionals and other educators and is frequently used as part of the delivery of career support. icould has produced a very useful suite of resources for teachers to facilitate its use in practice. However, up until now there has been no investigation of the ways that icould is actually being used in practice. Consequently in this project we sought to draw this practice together and to present it in a way that might stimulate, inform and inspire future practice. To do this a diverse group of practitioners were recruited to form a community of practice (COP). This report provides new ideas and insights into the way which the icould website is used by practitioners.
    • Male genital titillators and the intensity of post-copulatory sexual selection across bushcrickets

      Lehmann, Gerlind; Gilbert, James D. J.; Vahed, Karim; Lehmann, Arne W.; University of Derby; University of Hull; Humbolt University Berlin (Oxford University Press, 2017-07-10)
      Animal genitalia are diverse and a growing body of evidence suggests that they evolve rapidly under post-copulatory sexual selection. This process is predicted to be more intense in polyandrous species, although there have been very few comparative studies of the relationship between the complexity of genital structures in males and measures of the degree of polyandry. In some bushcricket families, males possess sclerotised copulatory structures known as titillators, which are inserted into the female’s genital chamber and moved rhythmically. Like other genital structures, bushcricket titillators are widely used as important taxonomic characters and show considerable variation across species in structure, shape and the extent to which they are spined. Here, we examine relationships between the presence/absence of titillators, titillator complexity and both mating frequency and the degree of polyandry in bushcrickets, using phylogenetic comparative analyses. Using published sources combined with original observations, data were obtained for the mean level of polyandry, the duration of the male and female sexual refractory periods and the level of complexity of titillators. To analyse data, we fitted phylogenetic generalised least squares models. No significant relationships were found between titillator presence or complexity and either the level of polyandry, duration of the male’s sexual refractory period or the ratio of the female and male sexual refractory periods. The duration of the female’s refractory period, however, was positively associated with titillator presence and negatively associated with titillator complexity. The data therefore partially support the hypothesis that post-copulatory sexual selection drives genital evolution in this taxon.
    • Male gryllus bimaculatus guard females to delay them from mating with rival males and to obtain repeated copulations

      Wynn, Helen; Vahed, Karim; University of Derby (Springer, 2004-01)
      Three hypotheses for the function of postcopulatory mate guarding were tested in the field cricket Gryllus bimaculatus De Geer. The duration of spermatophore attachment was greater in the absence than in the presence of a guarding male. The ejaculate protection hypothesis was, therefore, rejected. The duration of mate guarding was found to be equal to the interval between copulations, supporting the spermatophore renewal hypothesis. In support of the rival exclusion hypothesis, the presence of a guarding male did increase the duration of spermatophore attachment when a rival male was also present. The presence of a guarding male also delayed the female from mating with the rival male. Female mating status had a significant effect on the duration of spermatophore attachment. Females mating for the first time retained the spermatophore for a significantly longer period of time than females that had mated previously.
    • Mammals and their activity patterns in a forest area in the Humid Chaco, northern Argentina

      Huck, Maren; Juarez, Cecilia P.; Rotundo, Marcelo; Dávalos, Victor; Fernandez-Duque, Eduardo; University of Derby; Universidad Nacional de Formosa; Proyecto Mirikiná; Yale University (Pensoft, 2017-08-25)
      The Humid Chaco has a high mammalian biodiversity. As habitats are threatened due to exploitation and environmental degradation, protected areas can act as refuges for wild animals. In 2006, ca 1,100 ha of gallery forest were established as the “Owl Monkey Reserve” within the private cattle ranch “Estancia Guaycoléc”. The mammalian species richness and composition of the reserve was determined using direct observations, camera traps, and indirect evidence. The camera traps also allowed us to determine the activity periods of 20 of the species. Forty-two species were recorded. A fourth of those species (24%) are categorized under some risk of extinction in Argentina. While most species showed usual activity periods, 2 species (Mazama americana and Tayassu pecari) were not as exclusively nocturnal as reported from other sites, possibly due to reduced hunting pressure. The presence of various endangered species highlights the importance of protected private reserves.
    • Managing diversity and equal opportunities - some practical implications

      Foster, Carley; Newell, S.; Nottingham Trent University (2002)
    • Managing diversity and equal opportunities - some practical implications

      Foster, Carley; Newell, S.; Nottingham Trent University (2001)
    • Managing diversity and HR practice: challenges and constraints for the operational manager

      Foster, Carley; Harris, Lynette; Nottingham Trent University (2003)
    • Managing diversity in organisations: easy to talk about but difficult to do

      Foster, Carley; Harris, Lynette; Nottingham Trent University (2003)
    • Managing higher education brands with an emerging brand architecture: the role of shared values and competing brand identities.

      Spry, Louise; Foster, Carley; Pich, Christopher; Peart, Sheine; Nottingham Trent University; University of Derby; Nottingham Business School, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK; College of Business, Law & Social Sciences, University of Derby, Derby, UK; Nottingham Business School, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK; Nottingham Institute of Education, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK (Taylor and Francis, 2018-07-25)
      Corporate branding is a strategic issue for universities as the global higher education (HE) marketplace is becoming increasingly competitive and there is pressure to differentiate. Yet it is unclear how universities develop and manage brand strategies, and whether they draw upon any meaningful connections to the multiple stakeholders and sub-cultures engaged with a university’s brand. Using qualitative data gathered from an education faculty within an established UK university, this study found the faculty and university had competing brand identities and images. A strong faculty brand emerged co-created through the shared teacher related values of staff and external partners. This study contributes to the brand strategy literature by applying branding concepts to the under-researched HE context and proposing a new, more nuanced brand architecture model not yet reported in the branding literature which more accurately reflects the management of sub and corporate HE brands.