• Jan Kochanowski: Polish poet

      Tighe, Carl (2012-09)
    • The Jan Mayen microplate complex and the Wilson cycle

      Schiffer, Christian; Peace, Alexander; Phethean, Jordan; Gernigon, Laurent; McCaffrey, Ken; Petersen, Kenni D.; Foulger, Gillian; Durham University; Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada; Geological Survey of NorwayLeiv; et al. (Geological Society of London, 2018-02-01)
      The opening of the North Atlantic region was one of the most important geodynamic events that shaped the present day passive margins of Europe, Greenland and North America. Although well-studied, much remains to be understood about the evolution of the North Atlantic, including the role of the Jan Mayen microplate complex. Geophysical data provide an image of the crustal structure of this microplate and enable a detailed reconstruction of the rifting and spreading history. However, the mechanisms that cause the separation of microplates between conjugate margins are still poorly understood. We assemble recent models of rifting and passive margin formation in the North Atlantic and discuss possible scenarios that may have led to the formation of the Jan Mayen microplate complex. This event was probably triggered by regional plate tectonic reorganizations rejuvenating inherited structures. The axis of rifting and continental break-up and the width of the Jan Mayen microplate complex were controlled by old Caledonian fossil subduction/suture zones. Its length is related to east–west-oriented deformation and fracture zones, possibly linked to rheological heterogeneities inherited from the pre-existing Precambrian terrane boundaries.
    • Jane Eyre's Arrival at Thornfield Hall: Illustration of Jane Eyre’ arrival at Thornfield Hall

      McNaney, Nicki; University of Derby (2014-06)
      The illustration was awarded first prize in the illustration section of the Brontë Society creative competition. The print submitted for the Brontë creative competition investigated and examined the use of hand drawn elements in a predominantly photographic printing process and how this might be developed and disseminated to the design student cohort through my teaching using the photogravure method of creating mark-making. The work has been viewed at local, national and international levels by those interested in the works of the Bronte’s and the research could potentially give a greater understanding of the history and literature of the Bronte’s to general art enthusiasts and a wider public audience. Also published in Bronte Studies January 2015 40 (1)
    • Jerwood drawing prize 2015

      Fisher, Craig; University for the Creative Arts (2015)
      Group exhibition tour.
    • Jetting off on another flying faculty visit: what have we learned?

      Poultney, Val; University of Derby (BERA, 2018-01-31)
      The increased demand for education as a tradable commodity has seen a growing number of international students seeking UK qualifications over the past decade (OECD, 2009). It is becoming commonplace for universities to have their programmes delivered ‘off-site’ by a teaching team of academics who make regular trips abroad, often at great distance, to teach international cohorts for intensive periods of time. This is commonly known as ‘flying faculty’, and research into this phenomenon has revealed that it is anything but a holiday in the sun. Smith (2014) found that there were four areas UK academics needed to consider when preparing to undertake such work. Issues around quality assurance of the programme. The teaching and learning practices of the department/faculty. The professional development of the academics. The challenges of undertaking this type of work.
    • Job dissatisfaction among retail employees: a study of three leading UK retailers

      Whysall, P.; Foster, Carley; Harris, Lynette; Nottingham Trent University (2007)
    • Job dissatisfaction among retail employees: a study of three leading UK retailers

      Foster, Carley; Whysall, P.; Harris, Lynette; Nottingham Trent University (RoutledgeAbingdon, 2009)
    • John Minton’s "Time was away: A notebook in Corsica"

      Neal, Ian; University of Derby (10/11/2016)
      The paper examines the range in Minton’s approach at two levels. Firstly, it considers his dual strategies of Romanticism and Realism. Minton conflates topographical concerns with Neo-Romantic tendencies and draws on the landscape traditions of the sublime and picturesque, and the trope of the figure in the landscape. Secondly, the paper examines the images within a register of autonomy. Some images, operate autonomously, procuring primarily aesthetic responses; in contrast, others demand more literal intertextual readings; still, a further category of semi autonomous images are identified which subtly evoke elements of the text, without being hostage to Ross’s prose. These works in particular, I argue, invite the reader/viewer to re-assemble text and image so as to re-envision and re-imagine the Corsican Landscape. By examining text-image relationships, the place of landscape in post-war illustration, collaborative practice, and the relationship between fine art and illustration, the paper aims to contribute to forwarding the theorisation of illustration.
    • Jonathan Vickers and Kerri Pratt

      Robinson, Carl; University of Derby (WordPress, 21/07/2014)
      2014 Jonathan Vickers Award winner Kerri Pratt, her work and circumstances relating to the award.
    • Journals and CPD

      Bryson, David; University of Derby (2016-06-02)
      One of the significant tools for supporting continuing professional development (CPD) is the Institute of Medical Illustrators (IMI) owned publication the Journal of Visual Communication in Medicine. Other journals, for example the Journal of Biological Photography, The British Journal of Photography, British Medical Journal and specialist journals associated with specific areas of medicine, education and illustration, are also helpful. The aim of this paper is to look at journals and CPD together with activities to help you engage with current literature, practice and research. If you look at the examples of CPD activities suggested by both IMI and the Health Professions Council (HPC) one of the recurring themes is the role of journals (Table 1). Journals, alongside conferences, regional and national meetings, are key means of dissemination of research and support for professional development.
    • Journeys, pathways and track plans

      Rushton, Stephanie; University of Derby (2014-10)
      Journeys - a 2 week contemporary art exhibition based around the idea of the various forms a journey can take, be that physical, of the mind or imagination. Ecopsychology is a psychological subfield that looks at the relationship between human beings and their environment, embracing a more revolutionary paradigm: just as Freud believed that neuroses were the consequences of dismissing deep rooted sexual and aggressive instincts, eco-psychologists believe that grief, despair and anxiety are the consequences of dismissing equally deep rooted ecological instincts.’ It is this connection between the human psyche and nature that is being explored. ‘In the Drowned World’ a recent series of images taken on walks along the track-bed of a disused railway feature labyrinthine, tangled and sometimes menacing vegetation inspired by the paintings of Max Ernst, alluding to Ballardian themes of nature’s retribution. The large scale image is printed on duratrans mounted on opaque Perspex and fixed to the outside of a window, the impression being of the tangled vegetation viewed through the window.
    • Joy and calm: how an evolutionary functional model of affect regulation informs positive emotions in nature

      Richardson, Miles; McEwan, Kirsten; Maratos, Frances A.; Sheffield, David; University of Derby (Springer, 2016-08-23)
      Key theories of the human need for nature take an evolutionary perspective, and many of the mental well-being benefits of nature relate to positive affect. As affect has a physiological basis, it is important to consider these benefits alongside regulatory processes. However, research into nature and positive affect tends not to consider affect regulation and the neurophysiology of emotion. This brief systematic review and meta-analysis presents evidence to support the use of an existing evolutionary functional model of affect regulation (the three circle model of emotion) that provides a tripartite framework in which to consider the mental well-being benefits of nature and to guide nature-based well-being interventions. The model outlines drive, contentment and threat dimensions of affect regulation based on a review of the emotion regulation literature. The model has been used previously for understanding mental well-being, delivering successful mental health-care interventions and providing directions for future research. Finally, the three circle model is easily understood in the context of our everyday lives, providing an accessible physiological-based narrative to help explain the benefits of nature.
    • Karri Pratt: Our treasure houses

      Robinson, Carl; University of Derby (Derby Museum and Art Gallery, 2015-09)
      Kerri Pratt’s paintings have references to curious spaces derived from man-made, industrial and urban landscapes. Drawing on childhood memories of growing up in an ex-mining town, when the demise of previously thriving industries of Collieries, Potteries, Pipeworks and Brickworks were all too prominent. Kerri has reconnected with her home county of Derbyshire to produce a new series of paintings referencing remnants and traces of our industrial heritage.
    • Kathmandu: disiecta membra

      Nicoletti, Martino; Passuti, Roberto; University of Derby, School of Art and Design (Bologna: Stenopeica; Firenze: A-Buzz Supreme, 2013-07-15)
      A musical CD of electronic music devoted to the Himalayan metropolis of Kathmandu. The CD, created by Martino Nicoletti and Roberto Passuti for the independent music label Stenopeica, contains 11 songs. Special guests are the Italian singers Giovanni Lindo Ferretti and Teresa De Sio.
    • Kathmandu: eclissi delle due lune

      Nicoletti, Martino; Passuti, Roberto; University of Derby, School of Art and Design (Florence - Bologna: A-Buzz Supreme - Stenopeica, 2013-04)
      A CD of electronic and experimental music (ten tracks) created by Martino Nicoletti and Roberto Passuti. The work is inspired by the metropolis of Kathmandu (Nepal).
    • Kathmandu: leçons des ténèbres (Kathmandu: lessons of darkness)

      Nicoletti, Martino; University of Derby, School of Art and Design (Bangkok: Parbphin LDT, 2010)
      An artist’s book devoted to the abyssal metropolis of the Himalayas. Fragments from the travel note book of the author, encounters, poems, tales, visions, accompanied by a rare selection of black and white analogue photographs. The work has been published in a numbered limited edition of 108 copies, each enriched by a personal artwork of the author.
    • Kathmandu: lezioni di tenebre

      Nicoletti, Martino; University of Derby, School of Art and Design (Casadei Libri Edizioni - Roma, 2012)
      A poetical book devoted to the Himalayan metropolis of Kathmandu. The work is enriched by a large series of photogaphic images by the author.
    • "Kathmandu: lezioni di tenebre": un libro e della musica dedicata ad una metropoli dell’abisso ("Kathmandu: lessons of darkness": a book and a CD devoted to a metropolis of the abysses)

      Nicoletti, Martino; University of Derby, School of Art and Design (Centro Studi Orientali Roma, 2013-05-28)
      An article devoted to the publication of a book (poetry texts, photos and an attached musical CD) by Martino Nicoletti and devoted to the city of Kathmandu (Nepal).
    • Kelly + Jones : The Glass Tank Seers in Residence CaCO3

      Jones, Rhiannon; Kelly, Traci; University of Derby; Oxford Brookes University (2020-02)
      Kelly + Jones' research explores a decentralised and phenomenological methodology for approaching shared research dynamics. The Kelly + Jones: The Glass Tank Seers in Residence CaCO3 project approaches investigation as a non-hierarchical, non-linear series of happenings that privilege knowledge as a mingling and arrangement of rhythms and textures in anticipation of the appearing of the not-yet-seen. The Seers in Residence research model was first developed by Traci Kelly (2012). Kelly + Jones proposed that this model should form part of their practice as research exhibition at The Glass Tank, Oxford Brookes University, 2020 with an expanded scope to create a research opportunity not only across disciplines as previously but and also across generations of researchers. A key component of creating a research ecology lay in inviting others to pursue their own research through the lens of the exhibition. A micro-residency research model ”Seers-in-Residence” developed by Traci Kelly in 2012 as an open resource for creative practices provided the structure. Each invited researcher spent a continuous three hours engaging with Kelly + Jones’ exhibition material through the prism of their own discipline and research interests. The contingent research-in-action expands, renews and shifts the territory of artworks and practices, providing a ground for each ”Seer” to further mobilise their investigations through the process. The innovative intervention into exhibiting-as-research, created an inter-departmental, cross-disciplinary and inter-university research opportunity for four female researchers. The intergenerational grouping of researchers was also key to the process and included a management/senior researcher, a lecturer/ researcher, a PhD candidate and a third year B.A. Fine Art student. The result was the process built an intergenerational experience to benefit all participants by allowing integrated critical futures to develop within the Oxford Brookes University environment. Feedback from the residencies has been highly positive with students and staff commenting that they don’t normally get to witness their lecturers in active practice-as-research. The residencies also keep a static exhibition enlivened throughout its duration. The methodology: *The three-hour micro residencies were dependent upon a commitment by Oxford Brookes University to a resulting integrated publication on the different research areas and responses in order to disseminate the research. The micro–residencies took place once a week or twice a week depending on the duration of the exhibition. The invited seers were: Janice Howard BFA (Oxon), MA, SFHEA. Senior Lecturer in Fine Art Professor Helen Walkington BSc, PGCE, MSc. PhD, FRGS, NTF, PFHEA. Department of Social Sciences Deborah Pills BA Fine Art, Year 3 Kate Mohony Associate Lecturer Fine Art Through this unique method by Kelly + Jones they worked in depth with an appropriate and coherent process of practice as research. The context of creating and inviting other researchers to have a micro-residency and to site their occupations within the Kelly + Jones exhibition at The Glass Tank established practical reflection points through our own research and the trajectories of the seers own research interests - working in parallel. The outcome of the seers residency programme and its engagement with the Kelly + Jones exhibition as part of the research enquiry was that we were able to decentralise the research by opening it up to other researchers at various stages in their career without hierarchy. We have moved outside of the Fine Art community to gain fresh insight into our theory framework and site knowledge; this as evidenced by seer and geographer Professor Helen Walkington who brought new insight about the presence of flint within chalk beds and their significance around human activity.
    • Kelly + Jones In Conversation with Seers in Residence Artists for The Glass Tank

      Jones, Rhiannon; Kelly, Traci; University of Derby; Oxford Brookes University (2020-04)
      This research event took place online during lockdown so that Kelly + Jones could share insights and learnings of the exhibition process with the seers. Kelly + Jones invited the seers to consider the geographical site(s) of chalk deposit, the original residency site of a Victorian school staircase and our own bodies as a site. In addition to this Kelly + Jones extend an invitation to the seers to create site-specific responses to the exhibiting context. The conversation was hosted by Kelly + Jones with Seers researchers: Janice Howard BFA (Oxon), MA, SFHEA. Senior Lecturer in Fine Art. Professor Helen Walkington BSc, PGCE, MSc. PhD, FRGS, NTF, PFHEA. Department of Social Sciences Deborah Pills BA Fine Art, Year 3 Kate Mohony Associate Lecturer Fine Art The outcome of this sharing event is a series of further research questions relating to the female form, marine life and performativity of the body. It also addressed the effectiveness and problematics of using practice as research as both a curatorial method for installing and working as an artist live in the context of a gallery setting, and the use of micro residencies as a methodology for practice as research. These discussions and reflections are now the basis for a series of essays and performative gestures that will form a new publication for late 2020/early 2021.