• Gaining more than just vocational skills: Evaluating women learners’ aspirations through the capability approach

      Stuart, Rebecca; University of the Western Cape (Springer International Publishing, 2018-12-12)
      Vocational education and training had been a popular choice for women learners in the English Further Education sector. However, policy makers and policy researchers have characterized these women learners as providing a poor return on investment due to their failure to enter immediate employment. As a result, there have been significant cuts to funding. Such policy processes have not engaged with why these women returned to education and what they stood to gain from participation. This major absence is the focus of this chapter. Framed using a capabilities approach, women learners were asked why they had returned to FE and how they were going to use their knowledge and training. Using capabilities as a lens reveals a nuanced and complex picture of how education helps them to expand their well-being, agency, and freedom achievement.
    • Gaining more than just vocational skills: Evaluating women learners’ aspirations through the capability approach

      Suart, Rebecca; University of Nottingham (Springer, 2018-12-12)
      Vocational education and training had been a popular choice for women learners in the English Further Education sector. However, policy makers and policy researchers have characterized these women learners as providing a poor return on investment due to their failure to enter immediate employment. As a result, there have been significant cuts to funding. Such policy processes have not engaged with why these women returned to education and what they stood to gain from participation. This major absence is the focus of this chapter. Framed using a capabilities approach, women learners were asked why they had returned to FE and how they were going to use their knowledge and training. Using capabilities as a lens reveals a nuanced and complex picture of how education helps them to expand their well-being, agency, and freedom achievement.
    • Galvanic vestibular stimulation produces sensations of rotation consistent with activation of semicircular canal afferents

      Reynolds, Raymond Francis; Osler, Callum J.; University of Birmingham, School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, College of Life and Environmental Sciences (Frontiers, 2012)
    • Gandharva: the magic sound of the Nepali Sarangi

      Nicoletti, Martino; University of Derby, School of Art and Design (Firenze - Bologna: A-Buzz Supreme - Stenopeica, 2013)
      The CD presents a series of sarangi solo executions inspired by a rich repertoire of traditional Nepali and Tibetan melodies, performed by Shyam Nepali: in this work the long-established music of the Gaine of Nepal blends with the very personal experimentation and intimate feelings of one of the most renowned innovative and sensitive musicians in the panorama of contemporary Nepali music. Track 01: Morning bliss Track 02: Himalayan dawn Track 03: Across the clouds Track 04: Waiting Track 05: Footprints in the snow Track 06: Soul’s vibe Track 07: The shaman’s flight Track 08: Melting water Track 09: Beauty revealed Track 10: Don’t turn your gaze behind Track 11: Back from the fields Scientific researches, recording organisation and supervision: Martino Nicoletti; Sound engineering and post-production: Roberto Passuti; Label: Stenopeica – A Buzz Supreme.
    • Gardens and gardening

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2009)
      The garden has been an informing metaphor for geographical thought for sometime and as an affective material object and gardening as a process in the figuring and refiguring of space. It has represented an ideal environment and culture, a rather pre-cultural, pre-human state in a number of world religions, and continues to reappear in contemporary geographical discussions of the sacred. These leitmotifs of human geography are significantly theorized through ideology, discourse, and power, where ‘the garden’ becomes iconic. Signifying identity as well as status, cultural capital and social difference, as well as social/cultural relations, the garden and ways of gardening emerge as expression. A more complex conceptualization of the garden and gardening emerge in debates concerning consumption, commodification, and identity. In recent decades, the garden as artifact has been increasingly transformed to gardening as practice and as significant in developing critical conceptual approaches to a range of ‘new’ cultural geographies. These shifts and developments accompany the increasing geographical interest in process, practice, and performance. The ‘nature’ dimensions relating to, and perhaps informed by, gardens and gardening emerge in new ways in terms of the conceptualizations of nature where significance and meaning may emerge through practice, and in relation to the nonhuman; and debates concerning the ethical and moral in human geography, including shifting symbolism of the garden and of gardening in relation to war and peace. These developments in human geographies have been enmeshed with wider humanities and social science thinking and beyond these, from art theory and social anthropology to environmental debate.
    • The GASP Project

      Werner, Duncan; Uiversity of Derby, Creative Technologies Research Group (2014-06)
      Overview of GASP (Guitars with Ambisonic Spatial Production) presentation
    • The GASP project: Guitars with ambisonic spatial production.

      Werner, Duncan; University of Derby (2016)
      The GASP 'Guitars with Ambisonic Spatial Performance’ project seeks to demonstrate alternative ways in which various guitar performance styles can benefit from re-timbralisation and ambisonic spatial production techniques. GASP is an ongoing project where research into guitar performance utilising multiple individually processed string timbres, generated by our multichannel guitars, in conjunction with virtual guitar processing software, and processed ambisonically, provides scope for alternative performance and production techniques; more information on the GASP system at: http://tinyurl.com/GASP-Derby
    • GASP v2: Guitars with Ambisonic Spatial Performance

      Werner, Duncan; Wiggins, Bruce; Box, Charlie; Dallali, Dominic; Hooley, Jack; Middlicott, Charlie; University of Derby: Creative Technologies Research Group; University of Derby: Department of Media and Perfoming Arts (2016-06)
      The 2016 GASP v2 'Guitars with Ambisonic Spatial Performance' project seeks to demonstrate alternative ways in which various guitar performance styles can benefit from re-timbralisation and ambisonic spatial production techniques. This poster was funded through the ‘Undergraduate Research Scholarship Scheme’ (URSS) and presented at the University of Derby Buxton Campus 12th Annual Learning & Teaching conference on Monday 4th July 2016. The poster was also utilised as a contribution to the Creative Technologies Research Group (CTRG) ‘Sounds in Space’ symposium held at the University of Derby on 28th June 2016, at which three pieces of multichannel guitar recordings were demonstrated.
    • GASP: Guitars with ambisonic spatial performance

      Werner, Duncan; Wiggins, Bruce; Lawson, Tom; Weightman, Tom; Callister, Joe; University of Derby: Creative Technologies Research Group (2015-06)
      ‘Guitars with Ambisonic Spatial Performance’ (GASP) is an ongoing project where our expertise in surround sound algorithmic research is combined with off-the-shelf hardware and bespoke software to create a spatial multichannel surround guitar performance system. This poster was funded through the ‘Undergraduate Research Scholarship Scheme’ (URSS) and presented at the University of Derby Buxton Campus 10th Annual Learning & Teaching conference on Wednesday 1st July 2015. The theme being ‘Students as Partners: Linking Teaching, Research and Enterprise’. The poster was also utilised as a contribution to the Creative Technologies Research Group (CTRG) ‘Sounds in Space’ symposium held at the University of Derby in June 2015, at which three pieces of multichannel guitar recordings were demonstrated.
    • Gatsby careers benchmark north east implementation pilot: interim evaluation (2015-2017)

      Hanson, Jill; Vigurs, Katy; Moore, Nicki; Everitt, Julia; Clark, Lewis; International Centre for Guidance Studies (University of Derby, 2019-02-15)
      This report presents interim evaluation findings on the implementation of the Gatsby Benchmarks (herewith referred to as the Benchmarks) for good career guidance with a sample of 16 pilot schools and colleges (herewith referred to as education providers) in the North East of England. These interim findings report progress made against the Benchmarks during the course of the pilot (autumn 2015 to autumn 2017), the enablers and barriers faced, and the impact of the Benchmarks on learners’ career readiness and attainment. The interim findings suggest the following: Timescale - Schools and colleges involved were able to make significant strides towards fully meeting most, if not all, Benchmarks within two years. To date Benchmark 2 (Learning from career and labour market information) and Benchmark 7 (Encounters with FE and HE) have seen the largest increase in the number of pilot education providers fully achieving them. Benchmark 3 (Addressing the needs of every pupil) and Benchmark 4 (Linking curriculum to careers) have the least number of pilot education providers fully achieving them. Positive impact on learners. Learners show an increase in some aspects of career readiness and tentative increases in some aspects of GCSE attainment. Effective implementation of the Benchmarks. This was enabled by the existence of a regional facilitator to support pilot education providers and strong provider leadership and robust organisational infrastructures. Key barriers were a lack of time and space (in the curriculum), a lack of funding and a lack of commitment at senior leadership level, which impacted on achieving a cultural shift in some education providers. Regional impact. The implementation of the Benchmarks is impacting more widely in the region with non-pilot education providers forming links with pilot providers to seek support on developing good career guidance in their settings. Furthermore, wider stakeholders such as local employers and providers of careers education were also using the Benchmarks to review and develop their services to schools/colleges. Emerging challenges: A noticeable challenge was how the term ‘meaningful’, in relation to encounters with employers and employees, was interpreted and how education providers monitor provision of such encounters.
    • Gdansk: national identity in the Polish German Borderlands

      Tighe, Carl; University of Derby (Pluto Press, 1989)
      A study of National Identity in the Polish-German Borderlands
    • The gender and age profile of the house building sector

      Shepherd, Claire; University of Derby (NHBC Foundation, 2017-02-06)
      The UK house-building industry is being challenged to deliver a increasing number of new homes. However, it is also facing skills shortages among its workforce, as older workers leave the industry but are not replaced by new entrants. This report aims to establish the diversity of the house-building industry in terms of the age and gender profile of the workforce and is over-reliant on older workers. Women are engaged in house building, but in relatively small numbers and predominantly in office-based roles. The industry is taking steps to tackle the growing skills shortages, but more needs to be done. This report summarizes the actions that have been taken so far, and identifies opportunities for further progress on increasing the diversity of the workforce in the future.
    • Gendered perceptions of sales staff in DIY retailing

      Foster, Carley; Nottingham Trent University (2004)
    • Gendered retailing: a study of customer perceptions of front line staff in the DIY sector

      Foster, Carley; Nottingham Trent University (Emerald, 2004)
      This paper reports findings from a small scale study exploring the role gender plays in the interactions between customers and front-line staff in DIY retailing. Drawing on materials gathered through observations, informal discussions with staff and focus groups, this study suggests that “maleness” pervades many aspects of DIY retailing. For the respondents the image of the case retailer, B&Q, and the products sold had male connotations. Furthermore, male customers perceived male customer-facing staff to have better knowledge of technical DIY than female employees, even though this was not always the case. Given the rising interest from women in home improvements, it would appear that measures need to be put in place to create a more “inclusive” DIY store environment for female customers, and one that challenges the stereotypical assumptions held by many male home improvement customers.
    • Gendered retailing: a study of customer perceptions of front line staff in the DIY sector

      Foster, Carley; Nottingham Trent University (Emerald, 2004)
      This paper reports findings from a small scale study exploring the role gender plays in the interactions between customers and front-line staff in DIY retailing. Drawing on materials gathered through observations, informal discussions with staff and focus groups, this study suggests that “maleness” pervades many aspects of DIY retailing. For the respondents the image of the case retailer, B&Q, and the products sold had male connotations. Furthermore, male customers perceived male customer-facing staff to have better knowledge of technical DIY than female employees, even though this was not always the case. Given the rising interest from women in home improvements, it would appear that measures need to be put in place to create a more “inclusive” DIY store environment for female customers, and one that challenges the stereotypical assumptions held by many male home improvement customers.
    • The generation of panning laws for irregular speaker arrays using heuristic methods

      Wiggins, Bruce; University of Derby (Audio Engineering Society, 2007-06-25)
      Currently, the ITU standard surround sound speaker arrangement is based on an irregular 5 speaker array. However, this may change to an irregular 7 speaker array (as is now the standard on computer hardware) or more in the future. The Ambisonic system, pioneered by Micheal Gerzon, among others, in the late 1960’s, is very well suited to situations where the end system speaker configuration is not fixed in terms of number or position while also offering a simple way (via energy and velocity vector analysis) of quantifying the performance of such systems. However, while the derivation of the decoders is well documented for regular speaker arrangements [1], optimising the decoders for irregular layouts is not a simple task, where optimisation requires the solution of a set of non linear simultaneous equations, complicated further by the fact that multiple solutions are possible [2]. Craven [3] extended the system to use higher order circular harmonics and presented a 4th order Ambisonic decoder (9 input channels), although the derivation method used was not presented. In this paper a semi-automated decoder optimisation system using heuristic methods will be presented that will be shown to be robust enough to generate higher order Ambisonic decoders based on the energy and velocity vector parameters. This method is then analytically compared to Craven’s decoder using both energy/velocity vector and head related transfer function based methods.
    • A genetic algorithm approach to the minimum cost design of reinforced concrete flanged beams under multiple loading conditions

      Ceranic, Boris; Fryer, Colin; University of Derby (2008-09)
      This paper presents results of the application of genetic algorithms to the minimum cost design of continuous beams cast in situ with reinforced concrete slabs to form an integral structure. A practical “problem-seeks-optimum design” approach requires full consideration of these rigidly jointed beam-and-slab connections, together with realistic multiple loading conditions and limit states as embodied in British and European Codes of Practice. The fitness function includes the cost of concrete, longitudinal and shear reinforcement, and the cost of formwork and labour. Results obtained so far have shown that genetic algorithms can be successfully applied to the minimum cost design of flanged beams, overcoming the difficulties associated with the discontinuity of the design equations and their complex inter-relationship with the design variables.
    • Genocide: punishing a moral wrong

      Cherkassky, Lisa; University of Bradford (2009)
    • The geochemistry and oxidation state of podiform chromitites from the mantle section of the Oman ophiolite: A review

      Rollinson, Hugh; Adetunji, Jacob; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2015-02)
      Data are presented for mantle podiform chromitites from eight localities over 350 km strike length of the Oman ophiolite. Chromitite compositions form a continuum from cr# = 0.501 to 0.769, although this conflates a number of different magmatic ‘events’. The Oman mantle chromitites record a wide range of Fe3 +/ΣFe ratios (as determined by Mössbauer spectroscopy) extending from low values (close to those of MORB) to values higher than currently found in arc magmas and calculated oxygen fugacities for the chromites are about 1.8 log units above the QFM buffer, higher than found in the MORB source. Calculated TiO2 and Al2O3 contents for the parental melts to the Oman chromitites show that they had low TiO2 contents (0.23–0.96 wt.%) but a range of Al2O3 contents (11.8–15.8 wt.%). The variable Al2O3 content implies a range of parental magma compositions, probably formed at different temperatures, and the range of TiO2 compositions indicates that some melts were modified by reaction during their transit through the mantle. The range of compositions observed is not consistent with either a MORB or Arc source but is thought to reflect a range of melts derived from a compositionally evolving source during subduction initiation in a forearc environment
    • Geographical variation in the response to nitrogen deposition in Arabidopsis lyrata petraea.

      Vergeer, Philippine; van den Berg, Leon L. J.; Bulling, Mark T.; Ashmore, Mike R.; Kunin, William E.; University of Leeds, Institute of Integrative and Comparative Biology (2008)
      The adaptive responses to atmospheric nitrogen deposition for different European accessions of Arabidopsis lyrata petraea were analysed using populations along a strong atmospheric N-deposition gradient. Plants were exposed to three N-deposition rates, reflecting the rates at the different locations, in a full factorial design. Differences between accessions in the response to N were found for important phenological and physiological response variables. For example, plants from low-deposition areas had higher nitrogen-use efficiencies (NUE) and C : N ratios than plants from areas high in N deposition when grown at low N-deposition rates. The NUE decreased in all accessions at higher experimental deposition rates. However, plants from high-deposition areas showed a limited capacity to increase their NUE at lower experimental deposition rates. Plants from low-deposition areas had faster growth rates, higher leaf turnover rates and shorter times to flowering, and showed a greater increase in growth rate in response to N deposition than those from high-deposition areas. Indications for adaptation to N deposition were found, and results suggest that adaptation of plants from areas high in N deposition to increased N deposition has resulted in the loss of plasticity.