• Fabric dyeing and printing

      Wells, Kate (Conran Octopus Limited, 2000)
      Fabric Dyeing and Printing guides the reader through the choice of fabric types, the range of dye recipes and the profusion of traditional and new techniques. Exploring the patterning options with the help of detailed step-by-step photography, this book enables the reader to choose and work through any one of the over 30 techniques including: Preparing natural dyes; to printing with foils; hand-block printing to screen printing and the use of resist techniques. In addition, the work of contemporary designers such as Georgina von Eztdorf, Timney Fowler, Cressida Bell, and Janet Stoyle, is highlighted to demonstrate how techniques can be combined and interpreted.
    • Fabrica-tactilis, skilful production, structure - Fabric that may be touched, tangible

      Wells, Kate; Poundall, Robyn; University of Derby; David Nieper Ltd. (26/11/2014)
      Over the last 15 years, many of the tactile and haptic qualities of printed textiles have been abandoned for what is considered a fast and smooth digital solution through the increased popularity in using digital media as a the main source for design inspiration, conception and manufacture. Much of the creativity and qualities produced by hand processes and non digital techniques that in past produced tactile surfaces within a material via the creation of different densities or composite multiple layered structures, have in many cases been replaced with optical digital illusions of texture with the actual tactility of the material being lost or compromised. This paper outlines current collaborative design research that explores the uniting of haptic processes within cross-disciplinary fields of textiles, ceramics and glass. The results are the creation of a variety of materials both soft and hard. 3D-Soft is the result of natural and man-made manipulated fabrics that exhibit three-dimensional textured, puckered, distorted and translucent/transparent effects. That with further cross-disciplinary experimentation, the tactile textural qualities of fabric are transposed into hard surfaces: 3D-Hard, through different stiffening, ceramic and glass processes. The main aim of the research being the creation of unique exciting materials ‘Fabrica-Tactilis’ that develop and unite haptic skills with touch, exploring contradiction and harmony by embracing both traditional and non-traditional textile processes and alternative craft techniques for example ceramics and glass within their manufacture.
    • Facial expressions depicting compassionate and critical emotions: the development and validation of a new emotional face stimulus set

      McEwan, Kirsten; Gilbert, Paul; Dandeneau, Stephane; Lipka, Sigrid; Maratos, Frances A.; Paterson, Kevin B.; Baldwin, Mark; University of Derby (2014-02-19)
      Attachment with altruistic others requires the ability to appropriately process affiliative and kind facial cues. Yet there is no stimulus set available to investigate such processes. Here, we developed a stimulus set depicting compassionate and critical facial expressions, and validated its effectiveness using well-established visual-probe methodology. In Study 1, 62 participants rated photographs of actors displaying compassionate/kind and critical faces on strength of emotion type. This produced a new stimulus set based on N = 31 actors, whose facial expressions were reliably distinguished as compassionate, critical and neutral. In Study 2, 70 participants completed a visual-probe task measuring attentional orientation to critical and compassionate/kind faces. This revealed that participants lower in self-criticism demonstrated enhanced attention to compassionate/kind faces whereas those higher in self-criticism showed no bias. To sum, the new stimulus set produced interpretable findings using visual-probe methodology and is the first to include higher order, complex positive affect displays.
    • Facilitating students’ (doctoral) transition to the workplace: A critical review

      Upadhyay, A., Kumar, V., Garza-Reyes, J.A.; University of Derby (Routledge, 2019-05-21)
      The recent ongoing changes to the UK higher education sector have put immense pressure on both academics and students. Where academics are working hard to enhance the quality of the educational product, students, on the other hand, are struggling with the rising tuition fees and the challenging labour market. As a result securing a good job after graduation depends on how a student has managed to excel in gaining experience beyond the classroom and developing key skills through their time at university. This becomes particularly challenging in the current era, where globalisation brings further challenges and opportunities to the university sector, to seize the market advantages for those establishments able to respond in a timely and flexible way with appropriate innovation and internationalisation strategies. Doctoral researchers are an integral part of the student community. Hence it is important that universities assure the successful transition of these doctoral students to their workplace and externally. This study, therefore, attempts to provide a critical review on facilitating the doctoral students’ transition to the workplace through doctoral research positions and the role played by their PhD supervisors. The study methodology uses existing literature and interviews with students and faculty members to draw out experiences and perspectives. The results of this research can be applicable to any higher education institution in the UK and to other countries where the academic system is similar.
    • Fact or fiction

      Davies, Huw; University of Derby (2015-09)
      The theme for the exhibition was Fact or Fiction, providing a rigorous programme of feature films, midlengths, and shorts, as well as installations, artists in focus, and live events. Promenade exhibition of artists’ film and video presented as an Artists’ Trail, which links together a number of different site-specific architectural locations within the Elizabethan Ramparts. The 2015 edition featured the work of 40 artists and filmmakers from 20 different countries and included 12 UK premiers and 4 specifically commissioned works. The commissions (selected from an international call) provide the opportunity for the creation of original new works as a response to the Festival theme and environmental location. The audience attendance was 8910.
    • Factor and reliability analysis of a brief scale to measure motivation to change lifestyle for dementia risk reduction in the UK: the MOCHAD-10.

      Oliveira, Deborah; Aubeeluck, Aimee; Stupple, Ed; Kim, Sarang; Orrell, Martin; University of Derby; Federal University of Sao Paulo; University of Nottingham; Australian National University; University of Tasmania (BMC (Springer Nature), 2019-05-02)
      Background: Modifying lifestyle risk factors for dementia is a public health priority. Motivation for change is integral to the modification of health-related risk behaviours. This study investigates the psychometric properties of the previously validated tool entitled ‘Motivation to Change Lifestyle and Health Behaviours for Dementia Risk Reduction Scale’ (MCLHB-DRR) for use in the UK. Methods: A sample of 3,948 individuals aged 50 and over completed the 27-item MCLHB-DRR online. The psychometric properties of the scale were explored via Exploratory Principal Axis Factoring (PAF) with Oblimin rotation. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) was used to confirm the factor structure using chi-square (χ2), the goodness-of-fit index (GFI), the comparative fit index (CFI), the root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) and Root Mean Square Residual (RMR) as fit indices to evaluate the model fit. Internal consistency (Cronbach α) was measured for the final scale version. Results: Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) resulted in a parsimonious 10-item, two-factor structure (5 items each, factor loadings > 0.3) that explained 52.83% of total variance. Based on the Pattern Matrix, Factor 1 was labelled “Positive Cues to Action” and Factor 2 was labelled “Negative Cues to Action”. After addressing some errors in covariances, CFA showed a good fit where all fit indices were larger than 0.90 (GFI = 0.968, CFI = 0.938) and smaller than 0.08 (RMSEA = 0.072, RMR = 0.041). The standardized coefficients of Factor 1 and Factor 2 ranged from 0.30 to 0.73 and were all statistically significant (p < 0.001). The final scale showed moderate to high reliability scores (Factor 1 α = 0.809; Factor 2 α = 0.701; Overall α = 0.785). Conclusions: The new MOCHAD-10 (Motivation to Change Behaviour for Dementia Risk Reduction Scale) is a short, reliable and robust two-factor, 10-item clinical tool for use in preventative health care and research to evaluate motivation to change lifestyle for dementia risk reduction.
    • Factors affecting hospital staff judgments about sickle cell disease pain

      Elander, James; Marczewska, Malgorzata; Amos, Roger; Thomas, Aldine; Tangayi, Sekayi; University of Derby (2006)
      Judgments about people with pain are influenced by contextual factors that can lead to stigmatization of patients who present in certain ways. Misplaced staff perceptions of addiction may contribute to this, because certain pain behaviors superficially resemble symptoms of analgesic addiction. We used a vignette study to examine hospital staff judgments about patients with genuine symptoms of analgesic addiction and those with pain behaviors that merely resemble those symptoms. Nurses and doctors at hospitals in London, UK, judged the level of pain, the likelihood of addiction, and the analgesic needs of fictitious sickle cell disease patients. The patient descriptions included systematic variations to test the effects of genuine addiction, pain behaviors resembling addiction, and disputes with staff, which all significantly increased estimates of addiction likelihood and significantly decreased estimates of analgesic needs. Participants differentiated genuine addiction from pain behaviors resembling addiction when making judgments about addiction likelihood but not when making judgments about analgesic needs. The treatment by staff of certain pain behaviors as symptoms of analgesic addiction is therefore a likely contributory cause of inadequate or problematic hospital pain management. The findings also show what a complex task it is for hospital staff to make sensitive judgments that incorporate multiple aspects of patients and their pain. There are implications for staff training, patient education, and further research.
    • Family activist network performance photograph.

      McCloskey, Paula; University of Derby (2014-01)
      FAN is a group of 35 or so adults (academics and artists) and children, based across the UK (Cambridge, Chichester, Edinburgh, Lincoln, Liverpool, London, Norwich and Sheffield). FAN was formed to consider family life and climate change through a variety of art activist formats. Since its formation in 2014 FAN have exchanged slow mail correspondence, created a reading group This Changes Everything (Naomi Klein 2015), held recruitment events (Two Degrees festival, Artsadmin, London 2015), protested together (Time to Act, London, 2015; D12 Redlines in Paris for COP21, 2015), engaged in creating family performances showcase (Plas Caerdeon, Wales 2016), commissioned a science lecture about James Watt and the onset of Anthropocene Epoch (Glasgow Green, 2016), engaged in a themed discussion on Future Scenarios (2016), visited the site of the Happisburgh footprints, created Photo Books of FAN encounters (2015 – ongoing) and debated on FAN email list (2015 – ongoing). 'a place of their own' has been a member of FAN since 2014 and participated in all its performances and events, please see website links for more information.
    • Family Entanglements

      McCloskey, Paula; Vardy, Sam; University of Derby (2018-11-02)
      ‘Family Entanglements’: As the collaborative arts practice ‘a place of their own’ we were invited to deliver a performance 'Lab' at the Social Art Summit – an Artists-led 2-day conference Sheffield, 1, 2 November 2018. For this Art Council funded conference, over two-days artists from around the country, as well as international speakers came together to share practice, showcase work and explore what it means to be making art through social engagement right now. As one of 8 ‘labs’ we ran a session called ‘Family Entanglements’, the invitation for participants read as follows: ‘As a reflection of their own family practice they will facilitate collective activities based around string games and Cat's Cradle, whereby delegates will explore critical themes including: Radicality in the family and your practice; home as a site of arts practice; maternity as practice; alternative futures, new intergenerational relations and making different forms of kinship. The lab sought explore the research questions of ‘how living with and raising children might offer ways to think about alternative futures in the face of economic, social and environmental crisis? and how the 'family' might be a site of resistance to dominant ideologies?’
    • Fatigue interventions in long term, physical health conditions: a scoping review of systematic reviews.

      Hulme, Katrin; Safari, Reza; Thomas, Sarah; Mercer, Tom; White, Claire; Van der Linden, Marietta; Moss-Morris, Rona; University of Derby; King’s College London; Staffordshire University; et al. (PLOS, 2018-10-12)
      Fatigue is prominent across many long term physical health conditions. This scoping review aimed to map the fatigue intervention literature, to ascertain if certain interventions may be effective across conditions, and if novel interventions tested in specific long term conditions may be promising for other conditions.
    • Fears of compassion and happiness in relation to alexithymia, mindfulness, and self-criticism.

      Gilbert, Paul; McEwan, Kirsten; Gibbons, L.; Duarte, Joana; Matos, Marcela; Kingsway Hospital, Derby; University of Coimbra (British Psychological Society, 2011-11-08)
      Background. Thereisincreasingresearchtosuggestthatfearsof,andresistancesto, affiliativeandpositiveemotionsarelinkedtoself-criticismandarangeofpsychopathologies.Itisunclearhowthesefearsandresistancesarelinkedtoeachotherandhowthese inturnarelinkedtopsychologicalprocesses,suchasabilitiestobemindfulandrecognize and describe emotions. Objectives. Thisresearchexplorestherelationshipbetweenfearsofcompassionand happinessingeneral,withcapacitiesforemotionalprocessing(alexithymia),capacitiesfor mindfulness, and empathic abilities. Toadvance this research, a new scale was developed to measure general fears of positive feelings – the Fear of Happiness Scale. Results. The results showed that fears of compassion for self, from others and in particular fear of happiness, were highly linked to different aspects of alexithymia, mindfulness, empathy, self-criticism and depression, anxiety and stress. Especially noteworthy was the very high correlation between fear of happiness and depression (r =.70). Conclusion. While the development of positive emotions, especially those linked to affiliation and connectedness are increasingly seen as important therapeutic targets, little research has focused on the blocks and fears to positive emotions. This study used newly developed fears of positive affect scales (e.g., compassion and happiness) to explore these aspects and found they were significantly linked to psychopathology variables self-criticism and difficulties such as alexithymia.
    • Fears of compassion in a depressed population: Implication for psychotherapy

      Gilbert, Paul; McEwan, Kirsten; Catarino, Francisca; Baião, Rita; University of Derby (OMICS International, 2014-05-13)
      Background: While psychological therapies for depression have advanced in the last 20 years, still many people respond only partially and remain vulnerable to relapse. Insight into the limitations of our psychological therapies might be obtained from recent research that has revealed, in nonclinical populations, that some people can be fearful of positive emotions especially affiliative and compassion-focused ones. Aims: This study explores the fears of compassion in a clinical population and their associations with selfcriticism, self-compassion and depression, anxiety and stress. Method: 53 depressed patients completed a series of self-report scales. Results: Fears of compassion, particularly for oneself and from others, were strongly linked to self-criticism, depression, anxiety and stress, and negatively associated with self-compassion and self-reassurance. Conclusions: Since compassion and the affiliative emotions associated with compassion play a fundamental role in emotion regulation, individuals who are blocked or fearful of accessing these emotions are likely to be struggle with emotional regulation and the psychotherapeutic process. Research on the fears of compassion and affiliative emotions suggests these are important therapeutic targets.
    • Fears of compassion: development of three self-report measures.

      Gilbert, Paul; McEwan, Kirsten; Matos, Marcela; Rivis, Amanda; Kingsway Hospital; University of Coimbra; University of Nottingham (British Psychological Society, 2011-04-13)
      Objectives. There is increasing evidence that helping people develop compassion for themselves and others has powerful impacts on negative affect and promotes positive affect. However, clinical observations suggest that some individuals, particularly those high in self-criticism, can find self-compassion and receiving compassion difficult and can befearfulofit.Thisstudythereforedevelopedmeasuresoffearof:compassionforothers, compassion from others, and compassion for self. We also explored the relationship of these fears with established compassion for self and compassion for others measures, self-criticism, attachment styles, and depression, anxiety, and stress. Method. Students (N = 222) and therapists (N = 53) completed measures of fears of compassion, self-compassion, compassion for others, self-criticism, adult attachment, and psychopathology. Results. Fear of compassion for self was linked to fear of compassion from others, and both were associated with self-coldness, self-criticism, insecure attachment, and depression, anxiety, and stress. In a multiple regression, self-criticism was the only significant predictor of depression. Conclusion. This study suggests the importance of exploring how and why some people may actively resist engaging in compassionate experiences or behaviours and be fearful of affiliative emotions in general. This has important implications for therapeutic interventions and the therapeutic relationship because affiliative emotions are major regulators of threat-based emotions.
    • Fears of happiness and compassion in relationship with depression, alexithymia, and attachment security in a depressed sample.

      Gilbert, Paul; McEwan, Kirsten; Catarino, Francisca; Baião, Rita; Palmeira, Lara; University of Derby; University of Coimbra; Mental Health Research Unit; Derbyshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust; Derby UK; Mental Health Research Unit; Derbyshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust; Derby UK; Mental Health Research Unit; Derbyshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust; Derby UK; et al. (Wiley, 2013-11-27)
      Objectives In a non-clinical population, fears of compassion and fear of happiness have both been found to be highly correlated with alexithymia and depression. This study sought to explore these processes and their links with adult attachment and social safeness and pleasure in a depressed group. Method A total of 52 participants suffering from moderate to severe depression completed measures of fears of happiness, compassion from others and for self, in addition to measures of alexithymia, attachment, social safeness, and depression, anxiety, and stress. Results Fears of compassion and happiness were highly correlated with alexithymia, adult attachment, and depression, anxiety, and stress. Fear of happiness was found to be the best predictor of depression, anxiety, and stress, whereas fear of compassion from others was the best predictor of adult attachment. A path analysis showed that fears of positive emotion fully mediate the link between alexithymia and depression. This clinical sample had higher mean scores in fears of positive emotions, alexithymia, and depression, anxiety, and stress than a previously studied student sample. Conclusions This study adds to the evidence that fears of positive emotions are important features of mental health difficulties. Unaddressed, these fears can block positive emotions and may lead to emotional avoidance of positive affect thus contributing as blocks to successful therapy. Therapies for depression may therefore profitably assess and desensitize the fear of positive emotions. Practitioner points Many therapies focus on reducing negative affect and increasing positive affect. However, clinicians should be aware that positive emotions can be feared: in this clinical sample, depression is strongly associated with fear of happiness and fears of compassion. If clients fear happiness and compassion, they may resist or have difficulties in engaging in activities which evoke positive affect. If not addressed these fears may become blocks to therapy. Fears of different types of positive affect may require different interventions.
    • Fears of negative emotions in relation to fears of happiness, compassion, alexithymia and psychopathology in a depressed population: A preliminary study

      Gilbert, Paul; McEwan, Kirsten; Catarino, Francisca; Baião, Rita; University of Derby; University of Coimbra (OMICS International, 2014-05-13)
      Abstract Objectives: While fears of negative or aversive emotions are linked to experiential avoidance and psychopathology, recent studies have also focused on the relation between psychopathology and fear of positive emotions. This study explores 1. which negative emotions of anger, anxiety and sadness on most feared and avoided and 2. the links between fears and avoidance of negative emotions, with fears of positive and affiliative emotions, alexithymia, and self-reported depression anxiety and stress. Method: A new scale was developed to measure fears of three negative emotions anxiety anger and sadness. 52 participants suffering from moderate to severe depression completed this measure, along with fear of happiness, fears of compassion, alexithymia and psychopathology. Results: Interestingly fears of negative emotions were not correlated with each other; in other words one can be frightened of one negative emotion but not another. The correlation between the fear of an emotion and the avoidance of that emotion was different for the three negative emotions, with fear of anger being the most strongly linked to its avoidance. Fear of sadness was the only feared ‘negative’ emotion associated with depression. Fear of sadness and fear of anger, but not anxiety also linked to fears of positive emotions and alexithymia. Conclusions: Fears of (so called) negative emotions vary in terms of the degree to which people are fearful of them and avoid them. Importantly it was sadness, a neglected emotion in the studies of emotion avoidance, which accounted for the higher proportion of variance for depression and alexithymia.
    • Feel it in my bones: Composing multimodal experience through tissue conduction

      Lennox, Peter; McKenzie, Ian; Brown, Michael; University of Derby (Les éditions de PRISM, 28/09/2017)
      We outline here the feasibility of coherently utilising tissue conduction for spatial audio and tactile input. Tissue conduction display-specific compositional concerns are discussed; it is hypothesised that the qualia available through this medium substantively differ from those for conventional artificial means of appealing to auditory spatial perception. The implications include that spatial music experienced in this manner constitutes a new kind of experience, and that the ground rules of composition are yet to be established. We refer to results from listening experiences with one hundred listeners in an unstructured attribute elicitation exercise, where prominent themes such as “strange”, “weird”, “positive”, “spatial” and “vibrations” emerged. We speculate on future directions aimed at taking maximal advantage of the principle of multimodal perception to broaden the informational bandwidth of the display system. Some implications for composition for hearing-impaired are elucidated.
    • Feeling safe and content: A specific affect regulation system? Relationship to depression, anxiety, stress, and self-criticism.

      Gilbert, Paul; McEwan, Kirsten; Mitra, Ranjana; Franks, Leigh; Richter, Anne; Rockliff, Helen; University of Derby; Kingsway Hospital (Taylor and Francis, 2008-06-17)
      Recent work in the neuroscience of positive affect has suggested that there may be two different types of positive affect. One is linked to a drive/seeking system (and may be dopaminergic mediated) and the other is a soothing-contentment system (and may be opiate/oxytocin mediated). This study sought to develop a self-report scale that could tap these positive affects in regard to characteristic feelings individuals may have. Results from 203 students suggested three (rather than two) underlying factors: activated positive affect, relaxed positive affect, and safe/content positive affect. It was the safe/content positive affect that had the highest negative correlations with depression, anxiety and stress, self-criticism, and insecure attachment. Hence, greater clarity on the different types and functions of positive affect may demystify the relationship between positive emotions and well-being.
    • The Feldstein-Horioka puzzle and exchange rate regimes: Evidence from cointegration tests

      Apergis, Nicholas; Alexakis, Panagiotis; Kyranis Securities; University of Aegean (Elsevier, 1994-10)
      Many economists specialized in international finance claim that international capital markets are highly integrated (at least during the flexible exchange rate era). The main consequence of the above claim is that there is no longer any close relationship between investment and savings decisions. In other words, the close link between savings and investment ceases to exist under perfect capital mobility. Therefore, we construct a general equilibrium optimization model that is capable of generating artificial (model) data for savings and investment. Then, using the methodology of cointegration testing on these artificial data, we test whether there exists or not any link between savings and investment. The test is implemented between two different exchange rate regimes, that is, that of the Bretton Woods and that of the floating or flexible exchange rate regime. The results from the empirical analysis provide support for integrated capital markets over the second exchange rate era in the case of the United States of America.
    • Female career progression in retailing

      Foster, Carley; Whysall, P.; Harris, Lynette; Nottingham Trent University (Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2007)
      Abstract: Purpose – The aim of this paper is to highlight the factors that limit and support female career progression in the retail industry. Design/methodology/approach – The research used a combination of quantitative and qualitative research methods. Data were collected from employees and managers working in 31 stores belonging to national stores operating in the East Midlands as well as ten SME independent retailers based in the region. Findings – The women in this study can be categorised into those women who are not interested in pursuing a career in retail, those that seek promotion but have difficulties balancing the demands of their work and domestic circumstances and those who have actively pursued a career in the industry. Despite these categorisations, the study suggests that the career progression of all female staff is helped and hindered by a number of interrelating factors, such as whether they have a role model, are loyal to the store they work in or have children. Practical implications – It is proposed that career initiatives in retailing need to be more adaptable so that they take account of the different development needs of these three types of women. Originality/value – This is a large-scale study that uses a mixed method approach and considers the opinions of store staff working in a range of roles.