• The Eag potassium channel as a new prognostic marker in ovarian cancer.

      Asher, Viren; Khan, Raheela; Warren, Averil; Shaw, Robert; Schalkwyk, Gerhard V.; Bali, Anish; Sowter, Heidi M.; Royal Derby Hospital, School of Graduate Entry Medicine and Health, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology; University of Derby (2010)
      Ovarian cancer is the second most common cancer of the female genital tract in the United Kingdom (UK), accounting for 6% of female deaths due to cancer. This cancer is associated with poor survival and there is a need for new treatments in addition to existing chemotherapy to improve survival. Potassium (K+) channels have been shown to be overexpressed in various cancers where they appear to play a role in cell proliferation and progression.
    • Early detection of an emerging invasive species: eDNA monitoring of a parthenogenetic crayfish in freshwater systems

      Mauvisseau, Quentin; Sweet, Michael; Lyko, Frank; Andriantsoa, Ranja; Tonges, Sina; University of Derby; Surescreen Scientifics Ltd, Morley; German Cancer Research Center, Germany (Regional Euro-Asian Biological Invasions Centre Oy (REABIC), 2019-06-06)
      Procambarus virginalis, also known as the Marmorkrebs is a highly invasive crayfish species characterized by parthenogenetic reproduction. As conservation management plans rely on the accuracy of the presence and distribution information of invasive species, a reliable method is needed for detecting such species in aquatic systems. We developed and validated a qPCR-based assay for monitoring P. virginalis at low abundance, by detecting their eDNA traces left in freshwater systems. We were able to implement this new assay in-situ at two separate lakes in Germany, where the crayfish were known to be present. Furthermore, we did not detect the pathogenic fungus Aphanomyces astaci in the locations where the Marmorkrebs were detected. We conclude that the use of eDNA is therefore a reliable tool for the early detection of this “perfect invader”.
    • Early evaluation of Unistats: user experiences

      Hooley, Tristram; Mellors-Bourne, Robin; Sutton, Moira; University of Derby; Careers Research & Advisory Centre (CRAC) (UK Higher Education Funding Bodies, 2013)
    • Early gamma-band activity as a function of threat processing in the extrastriate visual cortex

      Maratos, Frances A.; Senior, Carl; Mogg, Karin; Bradley, Brendan P.; Rippon, Gina (2012)
    • The early memories of warmth and safeness scale for adolescents: Cross-sample validation of the complete and brief versions

      Vagos, Paula; Ribeiro da Silva, Diana; Brazão, Nélio; Rijo, Daniel; Gilbert, Paul; University of Coimbra; University of Derby; Research Unit of the Cognitive-Behavioral Research and Intervention Center, Faculty of Psychology and Education Sciences; University of Coimbra; Coimbra Portugal; Research Unit of the Cognitive-Behavioral Research and Intervention Center, Faculty of Psychology and Education Sciences; University of Coimbra; Coimbra Portugal; Research Unit of the Cognitive-Behavioral Research and Intervention Center, Faculty of Psychology and Education Sciences; University of Coimbra; Coimbra Portugal; et al. (Wiley, 2016-12-06)
      This work presents psychometric analyses on the Early Memories of Warmth and Safeness Scale, which intends to evaluate the subjective perception of ones' early rearing experiences. Factor structure, measurement invariance, latent mean comparisons and validity in relation to external variables (i.e., forms of self-criticism/self-assurance, experiential avoidance and depressive, anxious and stress symptoms) were investigated. A sample of 1464 adolescents (52.3% male adolescents, mean age = 16.16, standard deviation = 1.51) was used, including 1064 participants recruited from schools, 192 participants recruited from foster care facilities and 208 boys recruited from juvenile justice facilities. A shortened version of the scale was also developed and subjected to the same psychometric analyses. A one-factor measurement model was a good fit for the data taken from both the complete and brief versions of the instrument. Such measures showed to be internally consistent with alpha values higher than 0.89. Evidence for their construct validity in relation to external variables was also found, with correlation values ranging from 0.19 to 0.45 for the complete version and from 0.18 to 0.44 for the brief version of the instrument. The brief version was the only one proving to be gender and sample invariant. Boys and girls scored similarly in their account of early memories, whereas community boys presented significantly higher scores when compared with referred and detained boys. Thus, the brief version of the instrument may be an appropriate alternative for use with diverse adolescent samples and may serve to advance knowledge on how early experiences impact on psychopathological outcomes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    • East African theatres and performances

      Kasule, Samuel; Osita, Okagbue; University of Derby (Routledge, 2020)
      The focus of the book is primarily performance and its dialectical relationship with culture and society in East African theatre practices and traditions. A secondary interest pursued in the book is a broader exploration and articulation of the concept of performance, much in the same way that Schechner (2002: 34) proposes it to encompass a myriad of human activities that are perceived to be “restored behaviour” or “twice behaved behaviours”. The book explores the relationship between dance, dialogue, music, recitation, song, and the theatrical performance as inscribed in various indigenous concepts. It further centres on the insights into the nature of theatre and/or performance as a cultural practice and an art form, and theatre’s relationship to culture and identity. It examines indigenous performance processes and structures that include staging techniques, proxemic principles, design and its realisation, performer-spectator relationship, the non-professionalism of the different categories of performers and theatre makers in East Africa. The study takes account of the mix of representational and presentational modes of performance, aligned to predominantly non-script-based theatre practices, which sharply contrast with the often highly stylized forms of many Asian performance traditions as well as the often realistic modes of performance of some other non-African traditions. By examining both the indigenous performance forms and practices and the ways in which their work is conceptualized, developed, and staged, this study demonstrates the potential influence of African thought and aesthetics on aspects of global contemporary theatre and performance.
    • Easy to say, difficult to do: diversity management in retail

      Foster, Carley; Harris, Lynette; Nottingham Trent University (Blackwell Publishing LimitedOxford, 2005)
    • Eating attitudes and striving to avoid inferiority.

      Bellew, Rebecca; Gilbert, Paul; Mills, Alison; McEwan, Kirsten; Gale, Corinne; Kingsway Hospital; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2006-09-22)
      Vulnerability to some psychopathologies may be related to feeling the need to compete, strive, and achieve in order to avoid inferiority and rejection. This study explored “insecure striving”, (relating to a perceived need to strive to avoid inferiority and its consequence, rejection) in relationship to eating attitudes and appearance anxiety in students. Eating attitudes and appearance anxiety were associated with judgments of inferiority, insecure striving to avoid inferiority, and fear of losing out and were negatively associated to secure non-striving (social acceptance). Further work exploring the way people understand and react to the competitive dynamics of their social groups may illuminate important processes linked to eating disorders.
    • The echo of Tlatelolco in contemporary Mexican protest poetry

      Carpenter, Victoria; University of Derby (2005)
      The shooting of a student demonstration in La Plaza de las Tres Culturas in the Tlatelolco district of Mexico City on 2 October 1968 has been the subject of many literary works, among which the Tlatelolco poetry addresses not only the event itself but also the aftermath of the massacre. Both approaches examine the relationship between the ‘yo’/‘nosotros’ and ‘ellos’ constructs, focusing on the ‘nosotros’ construct as the result of this interaction. The following analysis of this process is based on the theory of self and Other, especially René Girard's theory of the mimetics of violence and the process of scapegoating as a basis for the relationship between the individual and society within the context of a violent conflict.
    • Eco-innovation practices’ adoption in the automotive industry

      Maldonado-Guzman, G; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; University of Derby (Emerald, 2020-02-22)
      Eco-innovation is a construct that is gaining increasing interest from academics and researchers since it is commonly considered in the literature as one of the strategies that allow manufacturing companies not only to significantly reduce the negative impacts on the environment but also the generation of pollutants. However, little is known about the adoption of eco-innovation practices in manufacturing companies, particularly in the automotive industry. Therefore, this research has as main objective to fill this gap in the literature and explore the interdependence between eco-innovation of products, processes and management. The study is conducted through a research framework consisting of 3 measurement scales, 14 items and 3 hypotheses and an extensive review of the literature. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to a sample of 460 companies in the automotive and auto parts industry in Mexico. Data were analyzed through Confirmatory Factor Analysis, Descriptive Statistics and Structural Equation Modelling. The results obtained show that product eco-innovation, process eco-innovation and management eco-innovation are good indicators for the adoption of eco-innovation practices for companies in the automotive and auto parts industry. The paper addresses a research gap in the academic literature in the eco-innovation field by providing evidence on the interdependence between eco-innovation of products, processes and management and the implementation of their practices in the automotive industry.
    • Ecological role of vertebrate scavengers in urban ecosystems in the UK

      Inger, Richard; Cox, Daniel, T. C.; Per, Esra; Norton, Briony, A.; Gaston, Kevin J.; University of Exeter; Gazi University; University of Sheffield (Wiley, 2016-10)
      Recent research has demonstrated how scavenging, the act of consuming dead animals, plays a key role in ecosystem structure, functioning, and stability. A growing number of studies suggest that vertebrate scavengers also provide key ecosystem services, the benefits humans gain from the natural world, particularly in the removal of carcasses from the environment. An increasing proportion of the human population is now residing in cities and towns, many of which, despite being highly altered environments, contain significant wildlife populations, and so animal carcasses. Indeed, non-predation fatalities may be higher within urban than natural environments. Despite this, the fate of carcasses in urban environments and the role vertebrate scavengers play in their removal have not been determined. In this study, we quantify the role of vertebrate scavengers in urban environments in three towns in the UK. Using experimentally deployed rat carcasses and rapid fire motion-triggered cameras, we determined which species were scavenging and how removal of carcass biomass was partitioned between them. Of the 63 experimental carcasses deployed, vertebrate scavenger activity was detected at 67%. There was a significantly greater depletion in carcass biomass in the presence (mean loss of 194 g) than absence (mean loss of 14 g) of scavengers. Scavenger activity was restricted to three species, Carrion crows Corvus corone, Eurasian magpies Pica pica, and European red foxes Vulpes vulpes. From behavioral analysis, we estimated that a maximum of 73% of the carcass biomass was removed by vertebrate scavengers. Despite having low species richness, the urban scavenger community in our urban study system removed a similar proportion of carcasses to those reported in more pristine environments. Vertebrate scavengers are providing a key urban ecosystem service in terms of carcass removal. This service is, however, often overlooked, and the species that provide it are among some of the most disliked and persecuted.
    • The economic benefits of career guidance

      Hooley, Tristram; Dodd, Vanessa; University of Derby (Careers England, 2015-07)
      This research paper sets out the evidence on the economic benefits of career guidance. It argues that although career guidance is primarily concerned with the individual it also offers major social and economic benefits. It is these benefits that justify public investment in the area.The evidence base provides insights into the effective delivery of career guidance and highlights the three main policy areas that it can support: (1) the effective functioning of the labour market and through this the economy, (2) the effective functioning of the education system; and (3) social equity. This paper focuses on the first of these in the context of current UK (with a focus on England) policy aims around fiscal restraint and deficit reduction. Career guidance contributes to a range of individual outcomes which influence a number of primary and secondary outcomes which in turn lead to macro-economic benefits. The evidence shows that career guidance can have substantial benefits for the economy by supporting individuals to enhance their capacities in ways that contribute to enhanced jobs, skills and growth. This suggests that the government should re-examine current career guidance policy and consider how it can best maximise the aforementioned economic benefits. This may include widening access in general, considering how best to target provision and rethinking what departments might be involved in funding and influencing the development of a lifelong career guidance system in the UK.
    • Economic Freedom and Income Inequality: Evidence from a Panel of Global Economies— A Linear and a Non‐Linear Long‐Run Analysis

      Apergis, Nicholas; Cooray, Arusha; Northumbria University; University of Nottingham Malaysia (Wiley., 2015-11-06)
      This study employs panel data from 138 countries (with unbalanced time frameworks) to investigate the relationship between economic freedom and income inequality. Both linear and non‐linear cointegration methodologies are used to identify a long‐run equilibrium relationship between: (i) the overall Economic Freedom of the World index and income inequality, and (ii) the major areas of the index and income inequality. The linear long‐run parameter estimates document that the association turns out to be negative, while the non‐linear long‐run parameter estimates illustrate that above a threshold point the association between economic freedom and income inequality is negative, while below this threshold point, the association turns out to be positive. The empirical findings survive a number of robustness tests, such as alternative measures of income inequality.
    • The ecstatic body: notes on Shamanism and corporeity in Nepal

      Nicoletti, Martino; University of Derby, School of Art and Design (Vajra Publications - Kathmandu, 2008)
      Based on a series of ethnographic and photographic investigations carried out in Nepal between 2000 and 2007, this essay analyses the role of the body and corporeity in Himalayan shamanism, with special reference to the ecstatic condition. The book is enriched by a considerable set of colour photos taken by the author.
    • Editorial: Seeing green: Achieving environmental sustainability through lean and six sigma

      Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Kumar, Vikas; Chen, Frank, F.; Wang, Yi-Chi; University of Derby; University of West England (Emerald, 2017-01)
    • Education and the digital revolution.

      Staunton, Tom; University of Derby (Routledge, 2017-08-23)
      This chapter explores how education could rise to the challenge of the digital world. This will explore the intersection between three different understandings of the digital world and consider the tensions the educator experiences in relation to these. This will highlight how debates around the nature of technology and how it interrelates to society creates debates which need to be engaged within the field of education studies. Technology places learners, educators and institutions at a precarious intersection created by technology where there is a need to navigate complexity more than take a single position.
    • Education and young people with sickle cell disorder: a knowledge review.

      Abuateya, Hala; Atkin, Karl; Culley, Lorraine A.; Dyson, Sue E.; Dyson, Simon M. (Radcliffe Publishing, 2008-06)
      Sickle cell disorders (SCD) are a group of chronic inherited blood conditions. The majority of studies on SCD have a clinical focus and deal with how those living with SCD 'manage' what is constructed as a given: the 'condition' of SCD. Consequently, many studies present the psychological impact, referring uncritically to what are termed 'coping strategies'. Current debates on SCD and other chronic conditions rarely engage with the broader social context. In part response to this, our paper presents a critical review of the literature on SCD, young people and education. The paper evaluates literature that touches on education and SCD, before concluding with a broad discussion of future research and policy priorities. Throughout, we reflect on how the process of constructing a knowledge base from available literature is problematic. We specifically discuss how current research presents a skewed picture of the experience of SCD, which is of limited value to those responsible for education policy and practice. The paper concludes that research should move beyond describing the basic health needs of people with SCD by including the social context of their lives. Existing literature on the individual educational experiences of young people living with SCD is, however, either dated or limited by being based on conceptual argument rather than empirical data. Consequently, there is a need for well-designed studies to establish the best way to meet the educational needs of young people with SCD, reflecting not only their health needs in school, but the whole context of living with SCD, including interaction with disabling or racist structures. Furthermore, this holistic approach could contribute to a wider understanding of the educational needs of young people from minority ethnic backgrounds and of young people living with chronic illnesses.
    • Education for innovation: exploring the place of creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship in Higher Education

      Wilson, Chris; Lennox, Peter; University of Derby (IETSD, 05/09/2012)
      This paper explores the increasing focus on the value of creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship in contemporary discourse and the challenge that this presents for established educational systems and traditional pedagogy. Through analysis of key literature and exploration od educational case studies, issues of definition and interpretation are explored in parallel with consideration of wider questions of operationalization and systemization. Focusing on how educational systems impact on the development and realization of these capacities through educational processes, the paper develops an overview of key perspectives, highlights examples of variation of interpretation of key terminology and presents points for consideration in the process of educational systems design. The paper concludes that there is an evident tension in educational models related to the definition and development of graduate attributes in particular but that there are educational strategies capabl;e of developing creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship as definable outcomes of learning and teaching processes.
    • Education Select Committee report on careers guidance for young people: Careers England policy commentary 18.

      Watts, A. G.; University of Derby (Careers England, 2013-01)
      This is the eighteenth in an occasional series of briefing notes produced for Careers England on key policy documents related to the future of career guidance services in England. This briefing note describes and provides context to the House of Commons Education Select Committee report, 'Careers Guidance for Young People: The Impact of the New Duty on Schools'.
    • Education, health and care plans: A qualitative investigation into service user experiences of the planning process.

      Adams, Lorna; Tindle, Angus; Basran, Sabrina; Dobie, Sarah; Thomson, Dominic; Robinson, Deborah; Codina, Geraldine; University of Derby; IFF Research (Department for Education, 2018-01)
      An Education, Health and Care (EHC) plan sets out the education, health and care support that is to be provided to a child or young person aged 0-25 years who has Special Educational Needs or a Disability (SEND). It is drawn up by the local authority after an EHC needs assessment of the child or young person, in consultation with relevant partner agencies, parents and the child or young person themselves. EHC plans, and the needs assessment process through which they are created, were introduced as part of the Children and Families Act 2014. The Act, and an accompanying SEND Code of Practice, sets out how local authorities must deliver EHC plans. In 2016, a national survey commissioned by the Department for Education (DfE) found variations in how EHC plan recipients experienced the EHC planning process across different local authorities.1 Based on these results, DfE commissioned two further research projects: a multivariate analysis of factors affecting satisfaction with the EHC planning process, and this qualitative investigation of user experiences of the EHC planning process. The qualitative investigation consisted of two distinct exercises: • Twenty-five face-to-face in-depth interviews with parents involved in the 2016 survey, with the aim of better understanding factors that lead to satisfaction and dissatisfaction with the EHC plan process. Thirteen interviews were conducted in local authorities with above average satisfaction, and 12 were conducted in local authority areas with below average satisfaction. • An evaluation of EHC plan quality focussing on plans provided by 18 of the 25 parents interviewed. The evaluation was conducted by a panel of 10 SEND experts with wide experience as SEND policy advisors, strategic leaders in LAs, specialist advisory teachers, officers in SEN statutory services, Special Needs Co-ordinators, teachers in special and mainstream schools and lecturers. There was little evidence of a link between families’ satisfaction with the process of getting the EHC plan and experts’ evaluations of the quality of the plan: this report therefore discusses these two strands of research separately.