• Careers leadership in practice: a study of 27 careers leaders in English secondary schools

      Andrews, David; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2019-04-01)
      Historically, responsibility for career education and guidance in English schools was shared between the school and an external careers service. The Education Act 2011 transferred responsibility for career guidance to schools. Andrews and Hooley (2017) argued that for schools to successfully manage these new arrangements they require a ‘careers leader’. In this article, we report on research in 27 English state schools and multi-academy trusts where careers leadership currently exists. This research broadly endorses Andrews and Hooley’s typology of careers leadership tasks with the addition of a new task around securing funding. However, it is noted that the way in which these tasks are organised varies, with five models of careers leadership evident. The advantages and potential challenges of each model are outlined and implications for the training and professional development of careers leaders are discussed.
    • The determination of finger flexor critical force in rock climbers

      Giles, David; Chidley, Joel;; Taylor, Nicola; Torr, Ollie; Hadley, Josh; Randall, Tom; Fryer, Simon; University of Derby (Human Kinetics, 2019-04)
      Purpose: To determine if the mathematical model used for the estimation of critical force (CF) and the energy store component W’ is applicable to intermittent isometric muscle actions of the finger flexors of rock climbers, using a multi-session test. As a secondary aim, the agreement of estimates of CF and W’ from a single-session test were also determined. The CF was defined as the slope coefficient and W’ the intercept of the linear relationship between total “isometric work” (Wlim) and time to exhaustion (Tlim). Methods: Subjects performed three (separated by either 20 m or >24 h) tests to failure using intermittent isometric finger flexor contractions at 45, 60 and 80% of their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Results: Force plotted against Tlim displayed a hyperbolic relationship, correlation coefficients of the parameter estimates from the work–time CF model were consistently very high (R2 > 0.94). Climbers mean CF was 425.7 ± 82.8 N (41.0 ± 6.2% MVC) and W’ 30882 ± 11820 N·s. Good agreement was found between the single and multi-session protocol for CF (ICC(3,1) = 0.900, 95% Confidence Interval [CI95%] 0.616 – 0.979), but not for W’ (ICC(3,1) = 0.768, CI95% 0.190 – 0.949). Conclusions: The results demonstrated the sensitivity of a simple test for the determination of CF and W’, using equipment readily available in most climbing gyms. While further work is still necessary, the test of CF described is of value for understanding exercise tolerance and determine optimal training prescription to monitor improvements the performance of the finger flexors.
    • The relationship between lean and environmental performance: practices and measures

      Dieste, M., Panizzolo, R., Garza-Reyes, J.A., Anosike, A.I.; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2019-03-23)
      Lean production has emerged in the past decades as one of the most popular themes in the business and manufacturing literature as it is the most extended production paradigm currently applied in industry. The lean approach is characterized by five principles (value, mapping the value stream, flow, pull and continuous improvement) that facilitate the reduction of waste (muda). In parallel, the environmental performance of a company in terms of pollution prevention, reduction and use/waste of resources is an issue increasingly concerning companies and customers in recent years. The focus on these issues has spurred an area of research that is commonly known as green production. Lean and green production concepts are both focused on waste reduction, and several authors have studied their relationships (commonalities and divergences) and the synergic effects of integrating these two management approaches. This research conducts a literature review in order to: (1) identify if firms which have applied lean principles and methods have improved their environmental measures; (2) highlight the environmental measures that are positively affected by lean practices adoption; and finally (3) underline the most important lean practices in relation to impacting environmental performance. The results are condensed in a final matrix that links some key lean practices to specific environmental measures. This matrix is of great interest for both researchers and practitioners since it suggests some possible relationships between various lean practices and the improvement of specific green performances. The findings give light regarding the state-of-the-art relationships between the lean and green production approaches.
    • Prediction of financial distress for multinational corporations: Panel estimations across countries.

      Apergis, Nicholas; Bhattacharya, Mita; Inekwe, John; University of Piraeus; Monash University; Macquarie University (Taylor & Francis, 2019-03-21)
      This research predicts ex-ante financial distress and analyses the link between financial distress, performance, employment, and research and development (R&D) investment in the case of multinational companies (MNCs). The conditional logit and hazard models are employed to predict financial distress, while a conditional mixed process model is employed to obtain consistent and efficient estimates. Financial distress generates contractions in performance, employment, and R&D investment. Hedging against risk mitigates the effect of financial distress on R&D. Our findings vary across countries, for example, we find MNCs in Canada, Israel and the U.S. benefit from hedging against risk. The findings also indicate that ex-ante financial distress is detrimental to employment for Canada, the U.K., the Netherlands and the U.S. The findings indicate the MNCs play different roles across countries in contributing jobs, investment in R&D during the distress period.
    • Measuring operational excellence: an operational excellence profitability (OEP) approach.

      Gólcher-Barguil, L.A.; Nadeem, S.P.; Garza-Reyes, J.A.; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2019-03-08)
      The pursuit of operational excellence in the manufacturing industry is at rise, but its measurement still lacks of appropriate indicators to determine its financial benefits. The ambiguity is due to the impact arisen from manufacturing fluctuations such as price and cost, production mix, and direct and indirect parameters variations. Manufacturing fluctuations distort the cost benefit of operational excellence. This paper therefore proposes the OEP (Operational Excellence Profitability) indicators to isolate the impact of manufacturing fluctuation, and distinctly identify the payback of operational excellence strategies and initiatives through cost benefits of achieving higher efficiency and yield. The paper presents the conceptual and mathematical development of the proposed OEP indicators and the formulas used for their calculation. Hypothetical and industrial-based investigations and applications of the OEP indicators are conducted for their validation. The results obtained from the hypothetical exercise and industrial case suggest that OEP indicators can provide an effective cost benefit analysis of operational excellence. This would contribute in providing manufacturing organisations with more complete information regarding the performance of their processes, which will allow their directors and managers to take better decisions related to the management and improvement of their processes.
    • Environmental, social and economic growth indicators spur logistics performance: from the perspective of South Asian Association for regional cooperation countries.

      Khan, Syed Abdul Rehman; Jian, Chen; Zhang, Yu; Golpîra, Hêriş; Kumar, Anil; Sharif, Arshian; School of Economics and Management, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China; School of Economics and Management, Chang'an University, Xi'an, Shaanxi, 710064, China; Department of Industrial Engineering, Sanandaj Branch, Islamic Azad University, Sanandaj, Iran (Elsevier., 2019-03)
      This article examines the association between green logistics operations, social, environmental and economic indicators of SAARC (South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation) countries. The research used GMM (Generalized Method of Moments) and FGLS (Feasible Generalized Least Squares) two methods to tackle the problems of heterogeneity, serial correlation and heteroskedasticity. The findings show that fossil fuel consumption is at the heart of logistics operations; the more fossil fuel and non-green energy resources that are used, the more negative effects on society and environmental sustain-ability result from this. A lower quality of transport-related infrastructure and logistics services is negatively correlated with fossil fuel usage, carbon emissions, health expenditure, greenhouse gas emissions and political instability of SAARC countries. Conversely, efficient customs procedures and greater information sharing among supply chain partners increase trade opportunities and also improve environmental sustainability in terms of minimum carbon emissions due to the shorter waiting and queue times involved. Further, the application of green energy resources and green practices can mitigate negative effects on social and environmental sustainability due to better logistics operations while improving financial performance in terms of higher GDP per capita, trade openness and greater export opportunities around the globe. As there is very limited research using green practices relationship with macro-level indicators in current literature, this research will assist both practitioners and policy makers to understand the roles of green supply chain and green logistics in enhancing environmental sustain-ability, social improvement and economic growth for a better future.
    • Parents’ experiences of having an excessively crying baby and implications for support services

      Garratt, Rosemary; Bamber, Deborah; Powell, Charlotte; Long, Jaqui; Brown, Jayne; Turney, Nicy; Chessman, Jo; Dyson, Sue; St James-Roberts, Ian; De Montfort University; University of Sheffield; University of Derby; University College London (Mark Allen Group (MAGonline), 2019-03)
      Evidence suggests that around 20% of healthy babies cry for long periods without apparent reason, causing significant distress to parents and a range of adverse outcomes. This study explored parents’ experiences of having an excessively crying baby and their suggestions for improved NHS support. Focus groups and interviews with 20 parents identified three key themes: disrupted expectations and experiences of parenthood; stigma and social isolation; seeking support and validation of experience. Parents experienced shock, anxiety and a sense of failure, leading to self-imposed isolation and a reluctance to seek help. Other people’s reactions sometimes reinforced their feelings. Parents need more support, including from health professionals, to cope with excessive crying, and recommendations for this support are given.
    • The adoption of operational environmental sustainability approaches in the Thai manufacturing sector

      Piyathanavong, V., Garza-Reyes, J.A., Kumar, V., Maldonado-Guzman, G., Kumar Mangla, S.; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2019-02-19)
      Evidence suggests that manufacturing companies have tried to address the current environmental challenges derived from their operations by implementing various operational environmental sustainability approaches, including green manufacturing (GM), cleaner production (CP), green lean (GL), green supply chain management (GSCM), reverse logistics (RLs) and circular economy (CE). However, although their adoption is well documented in developed nations and few other countries, very little has been done to understand such phenomenon in a rapid developing country such as Thailand. This paper aims at filling this gap by providing light into some fundamental issues regarding the implementation of these approaches in the manufacturing sector of Thailand. A survey-based exploratory research was carried out based on 287 Thai manufacturing companies. The data was analysed using a combination of descriptive and inferential statics. The study revealed that a large amount of investment capacity, and proper training & knowledge are needed to fully implement the studied operational approaches. This resulted in some of the weakest elements of Thai manufacturing firms and hence the main barriers to their implementation. The study also showed that Thai manufacturing firms consider the impact on the environment and benefits from adopting these operational approaches as company’s policy and own initiative, environmental awareness, and cost saving from conservation of energy as the main reasons for adopting the studied operational approaches. Finally, the findings also indicate that Thai manufacturing firms tend to implement them because of internal factors and that they lack of motivation from external factors and involvement from other stakeholders. The paper extends the current limited knowledge on the deployment of operational environmental sustainability approaches in Asia, and its results can be beneficial for organisations that aim at effectively adopting them to improve their operation’s sustainability.
    • The dynamic linkage between renewable energy, tourism, CO2 emissions, economic growth, foreign direct investment, and trade.

      Apergis, Nicholas; Jebli, Mehdi Ben; Youssef, Slim Ben; University of Piraeus; University of Jendouba; University of Manouba (Springer Open, 2019-02-19)
      Because of the lack of econometric studies in relevance to the link between tourism and renewable energy, the goal of this study is to remedy this lack and to explore the causal relationship between renewable energy consumption, the number of tourist arrivals, the trade openness ratio, economic growth, and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions for a panel of 22 Central and South American countries, spanning the period 1995-2010. The empirical findings document that the variables under investigation are cointegrated, while short-run Granger causality tests illustrate unidirectional causalities running from: i) renewable energy to CO2 emissions and trade; ii) tourism to trade; and iii) economic growth to trade and tourism. In the long-run, there is evidence of bidirectional causality between renewable energy consumption, tourism, trade openness and emissions. Thus, renewable energy and tourism are in a strong long-run causal relationship. Moreover, long-run fully modified ordinary least square (FMOLS) and dynamic ordinary least square (DOLS) estimates highlight that tourism and renewable energy contribute to the reduction of emissions, while trade and economic growth lead to higher carbon emissions. Therefore, encouraging the use of renewable energy and tourism developments, particularly green tourism, are good policies for this region to combat climate change.
    • Stock price reactions to wire news from the European Central Bank: evidence from changes in the sentiment tone and international market indexes.

      Apergis, Nicholas; Pragidis, Ioannis; University of Derby; Democritus University of Thrace (Springer., 2019-02-18)
      This paper examines the link between changes in the sentiment tone with respect to the European Central Bank’s (ECB) announcements and stock returns. The analysis constructs a new index that describes the tone of the sentiment derived from these announcements, spanning the period January 2002 to June 2016. The novelty of this work relies on the development of a unique sentiment index associated with the messages conveyed by the ECB’s activities and the effect of this index on both the mean and the volatility of certain major international stock markets. In this context, the sentiment index is present in both the conditional mean and the volatility equations. The findings indicate a significant impact on both the mean and the volatility of returns, whereas the news sentiment/stock returns association increases in strength during the crisis period. The findings survive a robustness check based on the characteristics of the ECB governor’s personality.
    • Do office workers adjust their chairs? End-user knowledge, use and barriers to chair adjustment.

      Underwood, Diana; Sims, Ruth; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2019-02-15)
      A quantitative field study measured end-user availability, knowledge and use levels of adjustable office chair functions in Korea-based office workers, together with their perceived barriers towards making adjustments. Fifty-one English-speaking workers were interviewed and surveyed in a related design. Results showed that of the number of adjustable functions available on their office chair (M = 5.39, SD = 2.3), participants knew fewer than half of them (M = 2.51, SD = 1.52) and used even less (M = 1.86, SD = 1.21). Fifty-three percent of participants knew two or less and 73% had used only two or less. Ten percent had used none. Results suggested physical needs (such as increased comfort or postural change) were a strong driver for previous chair adjustment behavior. Perceived cognitive barriers played a more significant role in limiting chair adjustment knowledge and use than physical or organizational barriers. Highly adjustable office chairs have the possibility of satisfying the adjustment needs of most end-users. However, adjustable chair functions need to be both available and known in order to be used.
    • Gatsby careers benchmark north east implementation pilot: interim evaluation (2015-2017)

      Hanson, Jill; Vigurs, Katy; Moore, Nicki; Everitt, Julia; Clark, Lewis; International Centre for Guidance Studies (University of Derby, 2019-02-15)
      This report presents interim evaluation findings on the implementation of the Gatsby Benchmarks (herewith referred to as the Benchmarks) for good career guidance with a sample of 16 pilot schools and colleges (herewith referred to as education providers) in the North East of England. These interim findings report progress made against the Benchmarks during the course of the pilot (autumn 2015 to autumn 2017), the enablers and barriers faced, and the impact of the Benchmarks on learners’ career readiness and attainment. The interim findings suggest the following: Timescale - Schools and colleges involved were able to make significant strides towards fully meeting most, if not all, Benchmarks within two years. To date Benchmark 2 (Learning from career and labour market information) and Benchmark 7 (Encounters with FE and HE) have seen the largest increase in the number of pilot education providers fully achieving them. Benchmark 3 (Addressing the needs of every pupil) and Benchmark 4 (Linking curriculum to careers) have the least number of pilot education providers fully achieving them. Positive impact on learners. Learners show an increase in some aspects of career readiness and tentative increases in some aspects of GCSE attainment. Effective implementation of the Benchmarks. This was enabled by the existence of a regional facilitator to support pilot education providers and strong provider leadership and robust organisational infrastructures. Key barriers were a lack of time and space (in the curriculum), a lack of funding and a lack of commitment at senior leadership level, which impacted on achieving a cultural shift in some education providers. Regional impact. The implementation of the Benchmarks is impacting more widely in the region with non-pilot education providers forming links with pilot providers to seek support on developing good career guidance in their settings. Furthermore, wider stakeholders such as local employers and providers of careers education were also using the Benchmarks to review and develop their services to schools/colleges. Emerging challenges: A noticeable challenge was how the term ‘meaningful’, in relation to encounters with employers and employees, was interpreted and how education providers monitor provision of such encounters.
    • A new macro stress testing approach for financial realignment in the Eurozone

      Apergis, Nicholas; Apergis, Emmanuel; Apergis, Hercules; University of Derby; University of Kent (Elsevier, 2019-02-12)
      Contrary to the common approach of stress-testing under which banks are evaluated whether they are distressed, this empirical study chooses to move from the micro stress test approach to a wider new macro stress test category. By being able to stress testing the entire economy of the Eurozone, it will permit big banks to fail and, at the same time, will open room for new banking players to enter the sector, promoting the essence of a healthy destruction. The analysis performs a battery of stress tests, by implementing VaR, Cornish-Fisher VaR, Monte Carlo VaR, Expected Shortfall, Cornish-Fisher Expected Shortfall, and Monte Carlo Expected Shortfall. At the same time, it explicitly considers the new regulatory approach of IFRS9 to incorporate extreme values from forecasted series in the distributions. The analysis also performs two versions of stress tests, one including TARGET2 and one without it. The results document that future stress tests should include TARGET2 values in order to capture a better picture of the stressed economy. The findings from these stress tests clearly illustrate that although there has been a trough after the distress call of 2008, this trough ended. These are results derived without including the TARGET2 transfers. By including the TARGET2 transfers we receive a different picture that possibly acts as a protective mechanism against any future crisis. Caution is still advised, possibly due to some lingering imbalances within the Eurozone.
    • The impact of books on social inclusion and development and well-being among children and young people with severe and profound learning disabilities: recognising the unrecognised cohort

      Robinson, Deborah; Moore, Nicki; Harris, Catherine; University of Derby; Centre for Educational Research and Innovation (Wiley, 2019-02-07)
      This paper presents the findings of an original research project commissioned by BookTrust, a respected UK charity that gifts books to children, young people (CYP) and their families. It explored the impact and modus of pleasurable engagement with books among CYP with severe and profound learning disabilities and applied a critical, phenomenological stance on what it means to read through drawing on 'inclusive literacy' as a conceptual framework. Data was collected from four local areas in England and included 43 CYP aged 4-14. In keeping with a phenomenological stance, it employed interpretivist methods involving 13 deep-level interviews with families to include observations and structured play; 13 observations of CYP sharing books with others in home, play or school settings, and interviews with 27 practitioners working in a range of organisations (e.g. Portage service, advisory teams). Findings were that books had a positive impact on well-being, social inclusion and development. CYP were engaged in enjoying the content of books through personalisation, sensory stimulation, social stimulation and repetition. This affirmed the theoretical and practical approaches espoused by 'inclusive literacy' but made a critical and original contribution to our understanding of the special place that books occupy as ordinary artefacts of literary citizenship among this cohort. The benefits of volitional reading among CYP who do not have learning disabilities are well known but the authors urge publishers and policy makers to recognise CYP with severe and profound learning disabilities as equally important, active consumers of books who have much to gain from reading for pleasure. There is strong evidence of the positive relationship between reading for pleasure and attainment, emotional and economic wellbeing. Reading books for pleasure has strong associations with emotional and personal development including self-understanding. This is shown to be the case across genders and socioeconomic groups but significantly less research has been done on the impact of reading books for pleasure among people with learning disabilities. This paper provides an original account of the impact of pleasurable reading and engagement with books on children and young people (CYP) with severe learning disabilities (SLD) and profound and multiple learning disabilities (PMLD). It demonstrates that responsive adults support pleasurable engagement with books and reading in ways that enable children and young people with reading disabilities to develop sensory, shared focus, communication, social and cultural understanding whilst also providing a basis for shared attention, closeness and wellbeing. Provided is account of the modus of pleasurable reading and engagement with books within the conceptual frame of inclusive literacy and phenomenological conceptions of what it means to read. Effective practices are illustrated and outlined to include recognition of the importance of multi-modal texts, personalisation and intense dyadic interaction. The paper urges policy makers and publishers to recognises CYP with SLD and PMLD as important, active consumers of books, claiming that their relative absence from consideration of positive impacts is a sign of exclusive conceptualisations of what it means to be a literate citizen.
    • Searching for synergies, making majorities: the demands for Pakistan and Maharashtra.

      Godsmark, Oliver; University of Sheffield (Taylor and Francis, 2019-02-03)
      This paper re-examines the Pakistan demand as part of a wider ‘federal moment’ in India, by addressing its connections with the coterminous calls for Samyukta Maharashtra in the context of the Cabinet Mission of spring/summer 1946. It highlights how the twinned processes of democratisation and provincialisation during the interwar years informed these demands. Both Muslim and Maratha representatives looked to locate and secure autonomous political spaces that would better secure their political representation. Their demands exemplified a shift away from a commensurative logic expressed through separate representation in the legislatures, and towards support for majority rule at the provincial level.
    • Life history, environment and extinction of the scallop Carolinapecten eboreus (Conrad) in the Plio-Pleistocene of the U.S. eastern seaboard.

      Johnson, Andrew L. A.; Valentine, Annemarie M.; Leng, Melanie J.; Schöne, Bernd R.; Sloane, Hilary J.; University of Derby; Nottingham Trent University; British Geological Survey; University of Mainz (SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology), 2019-02-01)
      Plio-Pleistocene mass extinction of marine bivalves on the U.S. eastern seaboard has been attributed to declines in temperature and primary production. We investigate the relationship of growth rate in the scallop Carolinapecten eboreus to variation in these parameters to determine which contributed to its extinction. We use ontogenetic profiles of shell d18O to estimate growth rate and seasonal temperature, microgrowth-increment data to validate d18O-based figures for growth rate, and shell d13C to supplement assemblage evidence of production. Postlarval growth started in the spring/summer in individuals from the Middle Atlantic Coastal Plain but in the autumn/winter in some from the Gulf Coastal Plain. Growth rate typically declined with age and was usually higher in summer than winter. Many individuals died in winter but the largest forms typically died in spring, possibly on spawning for the first time. No individuals lived longer than two years and some grew exceedingly fast overall, up to 60% more rapidly than any other scallop species (, 145.7 mm in a year). Faster growth was generally achieved by secreting more rather than larger microgrowth increments. Some very fast-growing individuals lived in settings of high production and low temperature. No individuals grew slowly under high production whereas most if not all grew slowly under ‘average’ production and low temperature. In that the rapid growth evidently enabled by high production would have afforded protection from predators, Plio-Pleistocene decline in production was probably contributory to the extinction of C. eboreus. However, the negative impact of low temperature on growth under ‘average’ production suggests that temperature decline played some part.
    • The challenges of GSCM implementation in the UK manufacturing SMEs.

      Kumar, Vikas; Sabri, Shahruzzaman; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Nadeem, Simon Peter; Kumari, Archana; Akkaranggoon, Supalak; University of the West of England; University of Warwick; Khon Kaen University; University of Derby (IEEE, 2019-01-31)
      The importance of green supply chain management has long attracted the interest of both researchers and practitioners in the industry. As environmental concerns are becoming one of the major issues discussed in the 21st century, countries with manufacturing as its principal economy contributor are always on the lookout for innovations and new approaches to balance both environmental considerations and profit making. The UK, being one of the top manufacturing countries in the world already considered green initiatives among their manufacturers. According to reports from the industry, large and international manufacturing companies from the UK have successfully implemented some green initiatives with significant improvements across the supply chain. However, the adoption of green initiatives is mainly focused on large companies rather the real backbone of the UK manufacturing industry, which is the small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). This paper therefore sets out to determine the implementation level of green supply chain among the SMEs. The paper adopts a mixed methods based approach and findings are based on 57 survey responses and 5 semi-structured interviews from UK manufacturing SMEs. The findings show that the level of GSCM implementation among the UK manufacturing SMEs is low compared to large organisations. Cost of implementing GSCM practices emerged as a key challenge faced by the UK manufacturing SMEs which was followed by the lack of knowledge within the organisation. This study thus adds to the limited literature on the manufacturing SMEs and provides evidence from the UK manufacturing sector on the adoption of GSCM practices.
    • Improving the reliability of warehouse operations in the 3PL Industry: an Australian 3PL case study.

      Dieu Ho, Thi Hien; Daniel, Jay; Nadeem, Simon Peter; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Kumar, Vikas; International College of Management, Manly NSW; University of Derby; University of the West of England (IEEE, 2019-01-31)
      Warehouses play an important value-adding role to provide a competitive edge, support business growth and efficiency throughout their supply chains. This paper explores warehouse operations (i.e. receiving, put away, picking, packing and shipping) and a series of challenges faced in managing warehouse operations in general and the 3PL industry in particular. Especially, the paper analyses the warehouse and logistics operations of an Australian 3PL company. By utilizing a mixed method approach both qualitative and quantitative data was gathered through in-depth interviews, direct observations and warehouse operations records. The collected data were then analyzed using thematic analysis. The data was screened and coded to further develop major themes to identify the problematic areas. This analysis helped to identify issues in operations related to the receiving process, missing, picking and locating items as well as human errors. While multiple approaches could be utilized to improve the operations, there yet remained a major challenge to manage operations within the planned budgetary limits. This research, therefore, provides some solutions/recommendations to improve the case company’s warehouse operations through staff empowerment, management process improvement, order dispatch and return process improvement, improvement in record keeping, and recruiting more personnel. These recommendations ensure company’s efficiency while balancing its challenges both in operations and budgetary constraints. This study thus provides an evidence to improve the reliability of warehouse operations through systematic process improvement.
    • Careers work in higher education in Pakistan: current practice and options for the future

      Zahid, Gulnaz; Hooley, Tristram; Neary, Siobhan; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) (Taylor and Francis, 2019-01-31)
      In this article we examine the development of career guidance in Pakistani higher education. The article is primarily based on a review of the existing literature on career guidance in Pakistan, but also includes the consideration of some new data gathered from a review of higher education institutions websites and five case study interviews. It considers both local and global influences as relevant contexts for understanding how the development of career guidance in Pakistani higher education is taking place. Concerns about alignment between skills supply and demand provide key drivers both for the development of career guidance and for wider higher education reform. However the practice of career guidance in Pakistani higher education is shown to be lagging behind the policy aspirations, both due to limited investment and due to more fundamental cultural challenges that have yet to be fully addressed. If career guidance is going to continue to develop within Pakistan it will need to be strengthened by new policy and resources but also through the development of indigenous theories.
    • The circular economy impact on small to medium enterprises

      Thorley, J., Garza-Reyes, J.A., Anosike, A.; University of Derby (WIT Press, 2019-01-30)
      In recent years, the literature surrounding the circular economy has grown. While the notion of reducing, recycling and reusing have become adopted practices in many organisations under the umbrella of sustainability, having a circular economy is arguably the next generation step, in terms of sustainability. A systematic literature review on the circular economy identified a gap in the research, regarding the impact at the micro level to be placed on small to medium enterprises. The research concludes that a paradigm shift in circular thinking at the micro level is required, and that further research is needed to identify new skills, resources, approaches, and business models to enable subject matter experts (SMEs) to adopt a circular practice.