• Feminine men and masculine women: in/exclusion in the academy

      Atkins, Liz; Vicars, Mark; Northumbria University (Emerald, 31/03/2016)
      The purpose of this paper is to draw on concepts of female masculinityto interrogate how hegemonic gendering discourses, forms and performances are inscribed in neoliberal narratives of competency in higher education in the Western Hemisphere. Drawing on individual examples, the authors consider how these narratives are omnipresent in the sector, and systematically act to exclude those who do not conform. In doing so, the authors draw extensively on bodies of literature exploring gender/identity, and neo-liberalism. In particular, the paper draws on the work of Halberstam (1998, 2011), and of Drake (2015).There are comparatively few women in senior positions in Higher Education and the authors argue that as gendering institutions they reproduce hegemonic gendering discourses. The authors find that hegemonic gendering discourses are instrumental in maintaining and privileging specific forms and perceptions of masculinity and femininity as inscribed within and reproduced by perceptions of professional competency. There are comparatively few women in senior positions in Higher Education and the authors argue that as gendering institutions they reproduce hegemonic gendering discourses. The authors find that hegemonic gendering discourses are instrumental in maintaining and privileging specific forms and perceptions of masculinity and femininity as inscribed within and reproduced by perceptions of professional competency. This paper examines neo-liberal practices from a more nuanced perspective than some traditional polarised critiques which regard gender as a binary. In doing so, it contributes to debates on masculinity, but more importantly, opens discussions about the implications of gendering discourses for the role of the few women in senior positions in higher education institutions globally.
    • Teaching Higher Education Courses in Further Education Colleges

      Tummons, Jonathan; Orr, kevin; Atkins, Liz; Northumbria University (Sage, 30/05/2013)
      As the number of higher education (HE) courses offered in further education (FE) settings increases, so does the need for teachers and trainee teachers to develop their teaching skills. This text is written for all teachers and trainee teachers in FE. It considers what it means to teach HE in FE and how an HE environment can be created in an FE setting. The text covers day-to-day aspects of teaching including planning and assessment, giving guidance on the unique needs of HE students. Chapters on research and quality assurance support the reader in developing some advanced teaching skills. This is a practical guide for FE teachers and trainee teachers as the sector adapts to the needs of education today.
    • Creating feminized critical spaces and co-caring communities of practice outside patriarchal managerial landscapes

      Duckworth, Vicky; Lord, Janet; Dunne, Linda; Atkins, Liz; Watmore, Sue; Northumbria University (Taylor and Francis, 29/01/2016)
      The experiences of five female lecturers working in higher education in the UK are explored as they engage in the search for a feminized critical space as a refuge from the masculinized culture of performativity in which they feel constrained and devalued. Email exchanges were used as a form of narrative enquiry that provided opportunity and space to negotiate identities and make meaning from experiences. The exchanges provided a critical space, characterised by trust, honesty and care for the self and for each other, that enabled a sharing of authentic voices and a reaffirming of identities that were made vulnerable through the exposing of the self as an emotional, politicised subject. Drawing on existing theoretical understandings of critical feminised spaces enabled us to create a pedagogical framework for work with students in further developing caring and co-caring communities of practice that are not alternative to, but are outside the performativity landscape of education.
    • Nothing changes: Perceptions of vocational education in a coalition era

      Atkins, Liz; Flint, Kevin; Northumbria University (Taylor and Francis, 25/06/2015)
      This paper explores young people's perceptions of vocational education and training (VET) in England. It draws on interview and focus-group data from a funded project. Parallel studies were carried out in The Netherlands, South Africa and England. This study reports on the English project. It found that serendipity, contingent events and influence of significant others are most influential in choice of vocational programme and that young peoples' understandings of possible career paths vary in sophistication, differentiated by age, programme level and subject area. Perceived attractiveness of VET was closely associated with societal perception of their programmes (which the young people considered to be negative). The paper considers the implications of these findings in the context of recent major policy initiatives in England. It concludes that, while some recent policy initiatives, such as the introduction of University Technical Colleges may be successful in raising the esteem of some forms of elite and specialized VET, broad vocational programmes at lower levels, and short courses associated with 'employability' and 're-engagement', will continue to be held in lower esteem and to confer little educational advantage on those young people, largely drawn from working-class backgrounds, who pursue them.
    • Learning on the margins: Experiencing low level VET programmes in a UK context

      Atkins, Liz; Northumbria University (AVETRA, 23/04/2014)
      This paper draws on an empirical study conducted in the UK to explore some of the issues surrounding young people on the lowest level VET programmes and make suggestions about ways in which the learner experience at this level might be enhanced. UK policy perception of young people undertaking low level VET programmes in Further Education (FE) colleges tends to characterise them within a deficit model of social exclusion, disaffectionand disengagement(Colley, 2003:169). Many have special educational needs (Atkins, 2013a). They have been the focus of multiple initiatives in both the context of the New Labour 14-19 agenda, and more recently in the Coalition governments response to the Wolf Review of Vocational Education (2011). These initiatives have largely consisted of the provision of routes through a range of VET opportunities, allegedly to enable young people to engage with the knowledgesociety (Bathmaker, 2005). This paper problematises these notions of opportunity, drawing on the little storiesof four young people to argue that the rhetoric which permeates Government documents fails to consider the significance of young peoples social and educational positioning. Finally, the paper considers the implications of these issues in terms of future practice, policy and research in the UK context
    • Dis(en)abled: legitimating discriminatory practice in the name of inclusion?

      Atkins, Liz; Northumbria University (Wiley, 23/03/2016)
      This article explores tensions between the policies and practice of inclusion and the lived experiences of disabled young people in education. Drawing on the narratives of two young men who participated in a small pilot study, it utilises theoretical concepts related to disability, structure and agency, and power and control, as it explores the ways in which inclusion can create subtle (and sometimes not so subtle) forms of exclusion. Focusing on the young men's experiences of further and higher education, it is argued that inclusive practices and policies, however well intentioned, can create new and subtle forms of marginalisation through the structures and discourse intended to address exclusion. I conclude by questioning whether, in a diverse and disparate society, in which all our lives are defined by the extent to which we are more or less equal than others, inclusion can ever be anything other than an illusory concept.
    • Research Methods for Social Justice and Equity in Education

      Atkins, Liz; Duckworth, Vicky; Northumbria University (Bloomsbury, 21/02/2019)
      Research Methods for Social Justice and Equity in Education offers researchers a full understanding of very important concepts, showing how they can be used a means to develop practical strategies for undertaking research that makes a difference to the lives of marginalised and disadvantaged learners. It explores different conceptualisations of social justice and equity, and leads the reader through a discussion of what their implications are for undertaking educational research that is both moral and ethical and how it can be enacted in the context of their chosen research method and a variety of others, both well-known and more innovative.
    • Convergence in condominium prices of major U.S. metropolitan areas

      Apergis, Nicholas; Payne, James; University of Piraeus; Benedictine University (Emerald, 2019-11-04)
      The purpose of the study is to examine the long-run convergence properties of condominium prices based on the ripple effect for five major U.S. metropolitan areas (Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, New York, and San Francisco). Specifically, we test for both overall convergence in condominium prices and the possibility of distinct convergence clubs to ascertain the interdependence of geographically dispersed metropolitan condominium markets. Our analysis employs two approaches to identify the convergence properties of condominium prices: the Lee and Strazicich (2003) unit root test with endogenous structural breaks and the Phillips and Sul (2007; 2009) time-varying nonlinear club convergence tests. The Lee and Strazicich (2003) unit root tests identify two structural breaks in 2006 and 2008 with rejection of the null hypothesis of a unit root and long-run convergence in condominium prices in the cases of Boston and New York. The Phillips and Sul 92007; 2009) club convergence test reveals the absence of overall convergence in condominium prices across all metropolitan areas, but the emergence of two distinct convergence clubs with clear geographical segmentation: on the east coast with Boston and New York and the west coast with Los Angeles and San Francisco while Chicago exhibits a non-converging path. The results highlight the distinct geographical segmentation of metropolitan condominium markets, which provides useful information to local policymakers, financial institutions, real estate developers, and real estate portfolio managers. The limitations of the research is the identification of the underlying sources for the convergence clubs identified due to the availability of monthly data for a number of potential variables. The absence of overall convergence in condominium prices, but the emergence of distinct convergence clubs that reflects the geographical segmentation of metropolitan condominium markets raises the potential for portfolio diversification. Unlike previous studies that have focused on single-family housing, this is the first study to examine the convergence of metropolitan area condominium prices.
    • An English version of the mathematics teaching anxiety scale

      Hunt, Thomas E.; SARI, Mehmet Hayri; University of Derby; Veli University (IJATE, 2019-10-15)
      This study represents the implementation of an English version of the Mathematics Teaching Anxiety Scale (MTAS), originally published in Turkey (Sari, 2014). One hundred and twenty-seven primary school teachers from across the U.K. completed the survey, including 74 qualified teachers and 53 trainees. Following item-reduction and factor analysis, the 19-item MTAS was found to have excellent internal consistency (α = .94) and has a two-factor structure. Factor one, labelled Self-Directed Mathematics Teaching Anxiety, includes 12 items pertaining to a teacher's own teaching practice and perceived ability, whereas factor two, labelled Pupil/Student-Directed Mathematics Teaching Anxiety, includes 7 items pertaining to anxiety concerning pupils/students failing assessments or not reaching curriculum/school targets. Pre-service teachers, compared to in-service teachers, self-reported significantly higher overall maths teaching anxiety. Among in-service teachers, there was a significant negative correlation between length of service and maths teaching anxiety. These findings are important in the context of retention issues in newly qualified teachers and the need to support trainees and newer teachers if they experience anxiety related to teaching maths.
    • Industry 4.0 as enabler of sustainability diffusion in supply chain: analysis of influential strength of drivers in emerging economy

      Luthra, S; Kumar, A; Zavadskas, E; Mangla, S; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; University of Derby; Plymouth University; Vilnius Gediminas Technical University; Government Engineering College India (Taylor & Francis, 2019-09-26)
      Industry 4.0 (I4.0) and sustainability are recent buzzwords in manufacturing environments. However, the connection between these two concepts is less explored in the literature. In the current business context, the future generation of manufacturing systems is greatly influenced by the rapid advancement of information technology. Therefore, this study aims to examine the drivers of I4.0 to diffuse sustainability in Supply Chains (SCs). This research identifies the most relevant drivers through the literature and discusses them with area experts. Afterwards, an empirical analysis is conducted to validate the key drivers. Finally, the Grey based DEMATEL method is employed to examine the influential strength of the identified drivers and to build an interrelationship diagram. ‘Government supportive policies’ and ‘Collaboration and transparency among supply chain members’ were reported as highly significant drivers of I4.0. This study is an initial effort that investigates the key drivers of I4.0 to achieve high triple bottom line (ecological-economic-social) gains in SCs by taking an example from an emerging economy, i.e. India. This study may help managers, practitioners and policy makers interested in I4.0 applications to diffuse sustainability in SCs.
    • Social and environmental sustainability model on consumers’ altruism, green purchase intention, green brand loyalty, and evangelism

      Panda, T. K.; Kumar, A; Jakhar, S; Luthra, S; Garza-Reyes, J. A.; Kazancoglu, I; Nayak, S.S.; University of Derby; OP Jindal Global University, India; Indian Institute of Management Lucknow, India; et al. (Elsevier, 2019-09-26)
      Across the globe, the awareness for environmental degradation and its harmful effects is rapidly growing. The whole world has come together to work in the direction to protect the environment. Consumers are increasingly becoming cautious towards the impact of their consumption pattern on environment and organisations can attain a competitive edge by leveraging this cautiousness by offering them green products/brands. However, it is importance for the marketers to understand that how increasing levels of sustainability awareness impacts other factors which explain pro-environmental behaviour of customers. To fill the existing gap in the current literature in this regard, the current study aims to build a structural model which includes social and environmental sustainability awareness in measuring customer altruism, buying intention, loyalty and customer evangelism. The theoretical model extends the existing framework of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) and explores the decision-making framework regarding ethical behaviour. Through existing literature review and expert input, the indicators (variables) for each construct were recognised. After that, data was collected from 331 respondents through a structurally designed questionnaire; the hypothetical model was test using the Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) technique. The findings of the study indicate that sustainability awareness positively influence the consumer altruism which in turn enhances the consumer purchase intention, green brand loyalty and green brand evangelism and altruism can and can bridge value-action gap for green brands. Current analysis supports the view that there are significant positive associations among the identified constructs.
    • A lean six sigma framework for continuous and incremental improvement in the oil and gas sector

      Nascimento, D. L. M; Goncalvez Quelhas, O. L.; Gusmão Caiado, R. G.; Tortorella, Guilherme; Garza-Reyes, J. A.; Rocha-Lona, L., Muñoz-Sanchez, C., Garza-Reyes, J.A., Kumar, V., Lopez-Torres, G.C.; University of Derby; Federal Fluminense University, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; University of Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, Brazil; Instituto Politecnico Nacional, ESCA Santo Tomas, Mexico City, Mexico (Emerald, 2019-09-19)
      This article aims to explore synergies between Lean Production (LP) and Six Sigma principles in order to propose a Lean Six Sigma (LSS) framework for continuous and incremental improvement in the oil and gas sector. The Three-Dimensional LSS Framework seeks to provide various combinations about the integration between LP principles, DMAIC cycle and PDCA cycle to support operations management needs. Design/methodology/approach - The research method is composed of two main steps: (i) diagnostic of current problems and proposition of a conceptual framework that qualitatively integrates synergistic aspects of LP and Six Sigma; and (ii) analysis of the application of the construct through semi-structured interviews with leaders from oil and gas companies to assess and validate the proposed framework. Findings - As a result, a conceptual framework of LSS is developed contemplating the integration of LP and Six Sigma and providing a systemic and holistic approach to problemsolving through continuous and incremental improvement in the oil and gas sector. Originality/value - This research is different from previous studies because it integrates LP principles, DMAIC and PDCA cycles into a unique framework that fulfils a specific need of oil and gas sector. It presents a customized LSS framework that guides wastes and costs reduction, while enhances quality and reduces process variability to elevate efficiency in operations management of this sector. The paper type is an original research that present new and original scientific findings.
    • Supply chain 4.0: Concepts, maturity and research agenda

      Frederico, G.F., Garza-Reyes, J.A., Anosike, A.I., Kumar, V.; University of Derby; Federal University of Paraná (UFPR), Curitiba, Brazil; University of the West of England (Emerald, 2019-09-14)
      Industry 4.0 is one of the most emergent research topics attracting significant interest by researchers as well as practitioners. Many articles have been published with regards Industry 4.0 however there is no research that clearly conceptualizes Industry 4.0 in the context of supply chain. In this paper, the term “Supply Chain 4.0” is proposed together with a novel conceptual framework that captures the essence of Industry 4.0 within the supply chain context. As Industry 4.0 is inherently a revolution, and as revolutions are evolutionary, this research also aims to capture the evolution of Supply Chain 4.0 from maturity levels perspective to facilitate the formulation and development of Supply Chain 4.0 strategy. Design, Methodology/ Approach – Following a deductive research approach and a qualitative strategy, a Systematic Literature Review (SLR) was adopted as the research method seeking to understand the relationships amongst supply chain, industry 4.0 and maturity levels research. The three phases of the SLR process utilized are: planning, conducting and reporting. A concept-oriented technique was applied to the outputs of the SLR to obtain the key constructs that would facilitate the development of the conceptual Supply Chain 4.0 framework. Findings – The SLR showed that there is limited research linking Industry 4.0 to supply chain. Nevertheless, it was possible to extract a set of thematic categories from the analysis of the articles which are referred to as constructs as they form the core of the conceptual Supply Chain 4.0 framework. These constructs are Managerial & Capabilities Supporters, Technology Levers, Processes Performance Requirements and Strategic Outcomes. Each of these constructs consist of a number of elements which are referred to as ‘dimensions’ in this research and a total of twenty one (21) dimensions were identified during the SLR. The SLR also demonstrated that maturity propositions for Industry 4.0 are still embrionary and entirely missing in the context of Supply Chain. Hence, this research develops and proposes a maturity levels framework that is underpinned by the core constructs of Supply Chain 4.0 and the corresponding dimensions. As these proposed frameworks are conceptual, this research also identifies and proposes several research directions to help fortify the Supply Chain 4.0 concept. Originality/value – The SLR demonstrated a clear gap in literature with regards to Industry 4.0 in the context of Supply Chain, and also in the context of Industry 4.0 maturity levels for Supply Chain. This research is unique as it formulates and introduces novel frameworks that close these gaps in literature. The value of this research lies in the fact that it makes significant contribution in terms of understanding of Supply Chain 4.0 with a clear set of constructs and dimensions that form Supply Chain 4.0, which provides the foundation for further work in this area. Research Implications/ limitations – This research argues that the frameworks are robust since the constructs and dimensions are grounded in literature thus demonstrating both theoretical and practical relevance and value. As Supply Chain 4.0 research is still in infancy, there are a range of open research questions suggested based on the frameworks that could serve as guides for researchers to further develop the Supply Chain 4.0 concept. Also, practitioners can use this framework in order to develop better understanding of Supply Chain 4.0 and be able to evaluate the maturity of their organizations. As the proposed frameworks are conceptual, they require further empirical research in other to validate them and obtain new insights.
    • Growth rate, extinction and survival amongst late Cenozoic bivalves of the North Atlantic

      Johnson, Andrew L. A.; Harper, Elizabeth M.; Clarke, Abigail; Featherstone, Aaron C.; Heywood, Daniel J.; Richardson, Kathryn E.; Spink, Jack O.; Thornton, Luke A.H.; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2019-09-12)
      Late Cenozoic bivalve extinction in the North Atlantic and adjacent areas has been attributed to environmental change (declines in temperature and primary production). Within scallops and oysters—bivalve groups with a high growth rate—certain taxa which grew exceptionally fast became extinct, while others which grew slower survived. The taxa which grew exceptionally fast would have obtained protection from predators thereby, so their extinction may have been due to the detrimental effect of environmental change on growth rate and ability to avoid predation, rather than environmental change per se. We investigated some glycymeridid and carditid bivalves—groups with a much lower growth rate than scallops and oysters—to see whether extinct forms from the late Cenozoic of the North Atlantic grew faster than extant forms, and hence whether their extinction may also have been mediated by increased mortality due to predation. Growth rate was determined from the cumulative width of annual increments in the hinge area; measurements were scaled up to overall shell size for the purposes of comparison with data from living species. Growth of the extinct glycymeridid Glycymeris subovata was at about the same rate as the slowest-growing living glycymeridid and much slower than in late Cenozoic samples of extant G. americana, in which growth was at about the same rate as the fastest-growing living glycymeridid. Growth of extinct G. obovata was also slower than G. americana, and that of the extinct carditid Cardites squamulosa ampla similarly slow (evidently slower than in the one living carditid species for which data are available). These findings indicate that within bivalve groups whose growth is much slower than scallops and oysters, extinction or survival of taxa through the late Cenozoic was not influenced by whether they were relatively fast or slow growers. By implication, environmental change acted directly to cause extinctions in slow-growing groups, rather than by increasing susceptibility to predation.
    • Group singing has multiple benefits in the context of chronic pain: an exploratory pilot study

      Irons, J. Yoon; Kuipers, Pim; Wan, Aston; Stewart, Donald E; Health and Social Care Research Centre, University of Derby (Elsevier, 2019-09-05)
      This paper reports findings of a pilot singing intervention to assist people living with chronic pain. Pain Management Clinic out-patients participated in 10 weekly group singing sessions. Benefits of the intervention and its impact on participants’ (N=4) experience of pain were explored qualitatively. Three main themes comprising over 20 separate codes indicated physical, psychological and social dimensions associated with the intervention. People with chronic pain identify multiple benefits from participating in a group singing program. Group singing in chronic pain settings has multiple benefits; and can be a beneficial adjunct to conventional pain management care and nursing, which may positively complement clinical outcomes.
    • Integrated green lean approach and sustainability for SMEs: From literature review to a conceptual framework

      Siegel, Rebecca; Antony, Jiju; Garza-Reyes, Jose; Cherrafi, Anass; Lameijer, Bart; University of Derby; Heriot Watt University; Cadi Ayyad University; University of Amsterdam (Elsevier, 2019-08-28)
      Over the last decades, there has been growing pressure on organizations to manage their operations in a responsible manner to improve their environmental and social performance. This has motivated organizations and researchers alike to identify ways to implement sustainable operations. In this context, Green-Lean has emerged as a major part of the sustainability answer. The discussion on Green-Lean in the context of manufacturing SMEs is in a less developed stage and deserves attention. Thus, the main objective of this research was to identify and analyze, through a systematic review, data on the challenges, success factors, tools and techniques, sustainability aspects, frameworks and benefits of Green-Lean in manufacturing SMEs. A systemic model representing the relationship among the determinants to implement a Green-Lean initiative for manufacturing SMES is also presented and discussed. The findings indicate that the most common challenge to Green-Lean implementation is a lack of metrics and measurement. 5S is the most used tool. In addition, the majority of frameworks have been developed for specific industrial sectors instead of generic frameworks to reduce/eliminate different wastes. However, these frameworks have missed the social dimension. The main contribution of this paper is the provision of an exhaustive summary of the state of knowledge and systematic classification of the relevant literature on the Green-Lean initiative in the context of SMEs. The findings are useful for both academics and SME owners and managers to undertake measures for improving sustainability.
    • Parental and health professional evaluations of a support service for parents of excessively crying infants

      Bamber, Deborah; Powell, Charlotte; Long, Jaqui; Garratt, Rosie; Brown, Jayne; Rudge, Sally; Morris, Tom; Bhupendra Jaicim, Nishal; Plachcinski, Rachel; Dyson, Sue E.; et al. (Springer Nature/ BMC, 2019-08-22)
      The ‘Surviving Crying’ study was designed to develop and provisionally evaluate a support service for parents of excessively crying babies, including its suitability for use in the United Kingdom (UK) National Health Service (NHS). The resulting service includes three materials: a website, a printed booklet, and a Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) programme delivered to parents by a qualified professional. This study aimed to measure whether parents used the materials and to obtain parents’ and NHS professionals’ evaluations of whether they are fit for purpose. Parents were asked about participating in a randomised controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate the materials fully in health service use. Methods: Participants were 57 parents with babies they judged to be crying excessively and 96 NHS Health Visitors (HVs). Parental use and parents’ and HVs’ ratings of the Surviving Crying materials were measured. Results: Thirty four parents reported using the website, 24 the printed booklet and 24 the CBT sessions. Parents mostly accessed the website on mobile phones or tablets and use was substantial. All the parents and almost all HVs who provided data judged the materials to be helpful for parents and suitable for NHS use. If offered a waiting list control group, 85% of parents said they would have been willing to take part in a full RCT evaluation of the Surviving Crying package. Discussion and conclusions: The findings identify the need for materials to support parents of excessively crying babies within national health services in the UK. The Surviving Crying support package appears suitable for this purpose and a full community-level RCT of the package is feasible and likely to be worthwhile. Limitations to the study and barriers to delivery of the services were identified, indicating improvements needed in future research.
    • Airway epithelial cells generate pro-inflammatory tenascin-C and small extracellular vesicles in response to TLR3 stimuli and rhinovirus infection

      Mills, Jake; Schwenzer, Anja; Marsh, Elizabeth; Edwards, Michael; Midwood, Kim; Sabroe, Ian; Parker, Lisa; University of Sheffield; University of Oxford; University of Derby; et al. (Frontiers, 2019-08-21)
      Viral infections are a common cause of asthma exacerbations, with human rhinoviruses (RV) the most common trigger. RV signals through a number of different receptors, including toll-like receptor (TLR)3. Tenascin-C (TN-C) is an immunomodulatory extracellular matrix protein present in high quantities in the airway of people with asthma, and expression is also upregulated in nasal lavage fluid in response to RV infection. Respiratory viral infection has been demonstrated to induce the release of small extracellular vesicles (sEV) such as exosomes, whilst exosomal cargo can also be modified in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of people with asthma. These sEVs may potentiate airway inflammation and regulate the immune response to infection. This study characterises the relationship between RV infection of bronchial epithelial cells and the release of TN-C, and the release of sEVs following stimulation with the TLR3 agonist and synthetic viral mimic, poly(I:C), as well as the function of the released protein / vesicles. The BEAS-2B airway epithelial cell line and primary human bronchial epithelial cells (PBECs) from asthmatic and non-asthmatic donors were infected with RV or treated with poly(I:C). TN-C expression, release and localisation to sEVs was quantified. TN-C expression was also assessed following intra-nasal challenge of C57BL/6 mice with poly(I:C). BEAS-2B cells and macrophages were subsequently challenged with TN-C, or with sEVs generated from BEAS-2B cells pre-treated with siRNA targeted to TN-C or control. The results revealed that poly(I:C) stimulation induced TN-C release in vivo, whilst both poly(I:C) stimulation and RV infection promoted release in vitro, with elevated TN-C release from PBECs obtained from people with asthma. Poly(I:C) also induced the release of TN-C-rich sEVs from BEAS-2B cells. TN-C, and sEVs from poly(I:C) challenged cells, induced cytokine synthesis in macrophages and BEAS-2B cells, whilst sEVs from control cells did not. Moreover, sEVs with approximately 75% reduced TN-C content did not alter the capacity of sEVs to induce inflammation. This study identifies two novel components of the inflammatory pathway that regulates the immune response following RV infection and TLR3 stimulation, highlighting TN-C release and pro-inflammatory sEVs in the airway as relevant to the biology of virally induced exacerbations of asthma.
    • 'Civis Indianus Sum': ambedkar on democracy and territory during linguistic reorganisation (and partition).

      Godsmark, Oliver; University of Sheffield (Cambridge University Press., 2019-08-13)
      This article considers Ambedkar’s ideas about the implementation of democracy in India, in the context of the linguistic reorganisation of provincial administrative boundaries. In doing so, it looks to emphasise the importance of territorial configurations to Dalit politics during this period, and in particular the consequences of ‘provincialisation’, which has received little attention within the existing literature. Rethinking space by redrawing administrative territory provided Ambedkar with one potential avenue through which to escape the strictures of Dalits’ minority status. In this vision, linguistic reorganisation (and partition) were harbingers of greater democratisation and potential palliatives to the threat of Hindu majority rule at the centre. In turn, however, Ambedkar simultaneously came to perceive the creation of these new administrative spaces as marking a new form of provincial majoritarianism, despite his best efforts to form alliances with those making such demands. In this sense, the article also seeks to address some of the shared processes behind linguistic reorganisation and partition, as two related forms of territorial redrawing. In the face of these demands, and the failures of both commensuration and coalition politics, Ambedkar turned to the idea of separate settlements for Dalits, whereby they might themselves come to constitute a majority. Whilst such a novel attempt at separation and resettlement was not ultimately realised, its emergence within Ambedkar’s thought at this time points towards its significance in any history of caste and untouchability in twentieth-century South Asia.
    • Do human critical success factors matter in adoption of sustainable manufacturing practices? An influential mapping analysis of multi-company perspective

      Ahuja, J; Kumar Panda, T; Luthra, S; Kumar, A; Choudhary, S; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2019-08-10)
      Sustainable human factors and change management systems have been gaining significant attention at global level for implementation of sustainable practices within organisations. With the rise in environmental degradation, the automotive sector has made efforts to adopt Sustainable Manufacturing (SM) practices to decrease the adverse effects on the environment instigated by emissions. Human Critical Success Factors (HCSFs) may play an important role in adoption of SM but in literature, no study has yet discussed the influence of HCSFs on the adoption of SM practices. The current work is an effort to fill this gap and to analyse the importance of HCSFs in adopting SM practices from a multi-automotive company perspective. In the first phase study, HCSFs were identified from existing literature and an empirical analysis was carried out to finalise identified HCSFs. In the second phase, to understand the influential relationship among these HCSFs, a DEMATEL approach was employed for developing a cause-effect model for each company. The result suggested that 'Green motivation', 'Customer relationship management', 'Management leadership', 'Communication' and 'Strategic alignment' are the highly significant causal HCSFs in efficient adoption of SM practices. The results of the study will help industry practitioners and managers to make strategic plans in the context of SM practices and its relationship with human factors for sustainable business development.