• Exploration and Prioritization of Just in Time Enablers for Sustainable Healthcare: An Integrated GRA-Fuzzy TOPSIS Application

      Singh Kaswan, Mahender; Rathi, Rajeev; Singh, Mahipal; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Antony, Jiju; Lovely Professional University, Phagwara, India; University of Derby; Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh (Emerald, 2021-06-21)
      The increased healthcare costs, improved service quality, and sustainability-oriented customer demand have forced the healthcare sector to relook their current process. The present work deals with the identification, analysis, and prioritization of Just in Time (JIT) enablers in the healthcare sector. JIT leads to waste reduction, improves productivity, and provides high quality patient care. The practical implementation of JIT depends on vital factors known as enablers. The enablers have been found through the comprehensive literature review and prioritized using responses from different healthcare facilities of national capital region of India. Grey Relational Analysis (GRA) has been used in the present study to rank enablers and ranks were further validated using fuzzy TOPSIS and sensitivity analysis. It has been found that top management support, teamwork, and real-time information sharing are the most significant enablers of JIT in healthcare with grey relational grades 0.956, 0.832, and 0.718, respectively. The corresponding closeness coefficients of the fuzzy TOPSIS for the enablers were found as 0.875, 0.802, and 0.688, respectively. The findings of the present research work will facilitate the healthcare organizations to implement a comprehensive JIT approach that further leads to improved patient care at low cost. The present study is unique in terms of the exploration of the readiness measures or enablers of JIT using GRA and fuzzy TOPSIS. The findings of the present research work will facilitate the healthcare organizations to optimize their resources for better patient care.
    • Definitions of biodiversity from urban gardeners

      Norton, Briony, A.; Shang, Bowen; Sheffield, David; Ramsey, Andrew; University of Derby (Oxford University Press, 2021-06-14)
      Living in urban environments can leave people disconnected from nature and less likely to engage with biodiversity conservation. Within urban areas, residential gardens can occupy large proportions of greenspace and provide important habitat for biodiversity. Understanding the views and knowledge of garden owners who have collective responsibility for managing these areas is therefore important. We aimed to understand how urban garden owners understand biodiversity. We surveyed garden owners in Derby, UK, across 20 areas spanning a socioeconomic spectrum. Residents were asked to explain their understanding of ‘biodiversity’ in a short definition format. Responses were classified using thematic and word frequency analyses. Of 255 respondents, approximately one third were unable to provide a definition. From the definitions provided, themes that emerged in frequency order were: variety of species or environments; coexistence of organisms; conservation of nature; a synonym for habitat; and uncommon answers not clearly related to biodiversity. Members of wildlife or gardening charities were more likely than non-members to say they could define biodiversity and to use specific taxonomic terms. We detected no difference between keen and less keen gardeners. These short-form responses captured many themes longer and/or qualitative assessments have identified about people’s understanding of biodiversity and illustrate a diversity and, in some cases, a depth of understanding of the concepts of biodiversity, without necessarily adhering to the formal definition. Given the variety of understanding, at this critical period, technical terms, even common ones, should be used with caution and with an open mind about how people interpret them.
    • Increasing students’ career readiness through career guidance: measuring the impact with a validated measure

      Dodd, Vanessa; Hanson, Jill; Hooley, Tristram; Nottingham Trent University; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2021-06-15)
      Career readiness is an important short-term outcome of career guidance activities in England. This research (1) details the development of a career readiness measure and (2) tests the relationship between career guidance interventions and career readiness among secondary school students. The measure was piloted on pupils (Study 1, N = 1508) in England taking part in a career guidance pilot programme. The instrument fitted a nine-item one-factor structure. In Study 2 (N = 2240), we found further evidence the factor structure was a good fit to the data. In Study 3 (N = 5242), we tested the relationship between career guidance activities and career readiness. Greater participation in career guidance activities was significantly associated with increased career readiness. These findings have implications for policymakers and researchers.
    • Decommissioning normal: COVID‐19 as a disruptor of school norms for young people with learning disabilities

      Beaton, Mhairi C.; Codina, Geraldene N.; Wharton, Julie C.; University of Derby; University of Winchester; Leeds Beckett University (Wiley, 2021-06-02)
      To slow the spread of COVID-19, on 20 March 2020, nurseries, schools and colleges across England were closed to all learners, apart from those who were children of key workers or were considered “vulnerable.” As young people with learning disabilities, families, professionals and schools become acquainted with the Erfahrung of the new horizon brought about by COVID-19, the negativity of altered social inclusion is becoming the “new normal.” Capturing this transitory moment in time, this paper reflexively analyses the curiously productive variables of altered ecological pathways to social inclusion for people with learning disabilities. Taking a hermeneutic stance, this paper draws on Gadamer's construction of the nature of new experiences. Focussed on the experience of social inclusion during the COVID-19 pandemic, semi-structured interviews were conducted with six key stakeholders. As the phenomenon in question was new, an inductive approach to thematic analysis was applied. The critical tenet of this paper is that the Erfahrung of COVID-19 has created the conditions for a “new normal” which have afforded children with learning disabilities altered opportunities for social inclusion, whether that be through increased power/agency for them and their families and/or new modes of connectedness leading to enhanced relationships. Whilst the impact of COVID-19 has been a negative one for many aspects of society, application of Simplican and Gadamer's theories on social inclusion and the nature of new experiences has permitted the surfacing of new possibilities for the social inclusion of children with learning disabilities.
    • Creative and artistic place-making: creating a museology of Civic Dialogues during a pandemic

      Jones, Rhiannon; University of Rome; University of Derby (Cumulus, 2021-06-11)
      Dr Jones chair of the Contemporary Art Working Group will discuss examples of how artists, educators and researchers are creating Design Culture(s) within Contemporary Art practice and research. It will consider this in relation to the Cumulus Community, so extending the debate on current issues, practices and research shared live at the Cumulus 2021 conference. To facilitate this, there will be a project presentation on Creative and artistic place-making: creating a museology of Civic Dialogues during a pandemic. Dr Jones invited Andrea Hadley-Johnson, Artistic Programme Manager, National Justice Museum, UK to co-present and share examples of methodologies engaged and devised through a co-creative and place-making model for the generation of public practice. This will be followed by an open platform for discussion. We will share ideas or acts of resilience, adaption and invention within Contemporary Art locating examples within a globalised frame of reference. The working group invited participation from academics, located internationally, whose practice and/or research challenges notions of civic resilience, design cultures, current cultural, social, and economic challenges in art and design.
    • Derby Voice: Creative Place-Making

      Jones, Rhiannon; McMahon, Daithi; University of Western Australia (Common Ground Research Networks, 2021-06-16)
      The artistic research project Derby Voice engaged 300 young people from areas of deprivation in Derby and at risk of exclusion from education. The methodology used S.H.E.D to create a co-designed site-specific installation at Derby Cathedral. It provided young people with opportunities to create work for a public context, to talk about their city and issues exacerbated by the COVID pandemic in the UK; such as BLM, education reform, employment, mental health and well-being. The research identified key barriers including the lack of cultural integration outside of school time in the UK and the impact on financial or family support. Derby Voice highlights the value of devising an artistic and dialogic methodology. The research’s impact is noted within UK contemporary social contexts. It enhanced wellbeing, widened access and increased cultural opportunities for young people in Derby. It shifted thinking about formal education settings and redefined the way young people’s voices are understood and can influence policy and act as a call for change. The research highlights the benefits of temporal installations as cultural and consultation spaces for stakeholders, public and policy-makers to engage directly with youth voice, through creative place-making by young people. It provided essential life skills resulting in social mobility and widening access to the arts. It disseminated both the design and impact of the research, proposing that dialogic methodologies are an instigator for change in order to enable and empower young people. The research actively contributed to the cultural offer in Derby and impacts of socially-engaged art.
    • Personal agency and organisational attachment: A career capital perspective

      Brown, Cathy; Hooley, Tristram; Wond, Tracey; Evolve Consulting Services Limited, Nottingham; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2021-06-14)
      Despite role transitions occurring frequently within organisations, career theories have often overlooked such transitions. Here we explore the role of personal agency and organisational attachment in shaping career capital enactment within intra-organisational role transitions. We propose a new career capital usage typology. Using an interpretivist approach, the research is based within a UK construction business and explores the role transition experiences of 36 business leaders. Through an analysis of workers’ career capital use we identify a new typology and groups workers as follows: Passive Worker, Company Worker, Political Worker and Career Worker. We argue that type varies in accordance with levels of personal agency and organisational attachment and that this variation in type is particularly important during intra-organisational role transitions.
    • Approaches to quality assurance in school-based career development: policymaker perspectives from Australia

      Rice, Suzanne; Hooley, Tristram; Crebbin, Sue; University of Melbourne, Australia; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2021-05-19)
      In this article we explore Australian policymaker perspectives on the quality assurance of career development (CD) programmes in schools. We found that Australian policymakers are concerned about the quality of CD provision in schools and have a wide range of approaches that they deploy to ensure and assure quality at the school level. Quality assurance within the country is focused on the qualifications and professionalism of the people delivering career development programmes rather than on systemic or organisational quality. We also found that the range of quality assurance tools that are deployed by such policymakers varies across the different Australian jurisdictions and is influenced by geography, the size of the jurisdiction and the level of priority given to career guidance.
    • Resilience, Reflection and Reflexivity

      Codina, Geraldene; Fordham, Jon; University of Derby; Urban Primary School, UK (Bloomsbury, 2021-02-25)
      Historically the teacher resilience literature has tended to focus on the individual (Day, 2017), their ability to manage stressors and risk factors and to draw on protective factors (Howard and Johnson, 2004). More recently the emphasis has shifted from analysis of the individual, towards understandings which emphasise the interaction between individuals and their environments (Ungar, 2012). Focussed more on the latter rather than the former, this chapter moves away from the potentially damaging effects of a ‘pull yourself together’ mentality, in favour of analysis which contextualises teacher resilience. Teacher resilience is viewed more in terms of the space where an individual’s capacity to navigate challenges interacts over time with their personal and professional contexts (Beltman, 2015). The desired outcome of this meeting between individual and context is a teacher who experiences professional engagement and growth, commitment, enthusiasm, satisfaction, and wellbeing (Beltman, 2015) and thus is able to act in a personally, socially and emotionally responsible way. The nexus between professional challenge and teacher satisfaction is explored through two case studies presented in this chapter and the subsequent discussion which addresses the inclusion of children with additional needs (both special educational needs and/or disability (SEND) and able and talented).
    • A Novel Location-Inventory-Routing Problem in a Two-Stage Red Meat Supply Chain with Logistic Decisions: Evidence from an Emerging

      Rahbari, M.; Razavi Hajiagha, S. H.; Amoozad Mahdiraji, H.; Riyahi Dorcheh, F.; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Kharazmi University, Tehran, Iran; De Montfort University; University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran; University of Derby (Emerald, 2021-05-31)
      This study focuses on a specific method of meat production that involves carcass purchase and meat production by packing facilities with a novel two-stage model that simultaneously considers location-routing and inventory-production operating decisions. The considered problem aims to reduce variable and fixed transportation and production costs, inventory holding cost and the cost of opening cold storage facilities. The proposed model encompasses a two-stage model consisting of a single-echelon and a three-echelon many-to-many network with deterministic demand. The proposed model is a mixed-integer linear programming (MILP) model which was tested with the general algebraic modelling system (GAMS) software for a real-world case study in Iran. A sensitivity analysis was performed to examine the effect of retailers' holding capacity and supply capacity at carcass suppliers. In this research, the number of products transferred at each level, the number of products held, the quantity of red meat produced, the required cold storage facilities and the required vehicles were optimally specified. The outcomes indicated a two percent (2%) decrease in cost per kg of red meat. Eventually, the outcomes of the first and second sensitivity analysis indicated that reduced retailers' holding capacity and supply capacity at carcass suppliers leads to higher total costs. This research proposes a novel multi-period location-inventory-routing problem for the red meat supply chain in an emerging economy with a heterogeneous vehicle fleet and logistics decisions. The proposed model is presented in two stages and four-echelon including carcass suppliers, packing facilities, cold storage facilities and retailers.
    • Explosive felsic eruptions on ocean islands: a case study from Ascension Island (South Atlantic)

      Preece, Katie; Barclay, Jenni; Brown, Richard J.; Chamberlain, Katy; Mark, Darren F.; Swansea University; University of East Anglia; Durham University; University of Derby; Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre, East Kilbride; et al. (Elsevier, 2021-05-19)
      Ocean island volcanism is generally considered to be dominated by basaltic eruptions, yet felsic products associated with more hazardous explosive eruptive events are also present in the geological record of many of these islands. Ascension Island, recently recognised as an active volcanic system, exhibits explosive felsic eruption deposits but their age, eruptive styles and stratigraphic association with mafic volcanism are thus far unclear. Here we present a felsic pyroclastic stratigraphy for Ascension Island, supplemented by 26 new 40Ar/39Ar ages and whole rock geochemical XRF data. More than 80 felsic pyroclastic eruptions have occurred over the last ~ 1 Myr, including subplinian and phreatomagmatic eruptions, which produced pumice fall and pyroclastic density current deposits. Detailed sampling suggests felsic events are unevenly distributed in space and time. Subaerial activity can be divided into four Periods: Period 1 (~1000 – 500 ka) felsic and mafic eruptions, with felsic explosive eruptions, linked to a Central Felsic Complex; Period 2 (~ 500 – 100 ka) mafic period; Period 3 (~ 100 – 50 ka) felsic eruptions associated with the Eastern Felsic Complex; Period 4 (< 50 ka) mafic eruptions. The last explosive eruption occurred at ~ 60 ka. This work highlights the cyclical nature of ocean island volcanism and the timescales over which changes between predominantly mafic and felsic volcanism occur. The prevalence of past felsic explosive eruptions on Ascension highlights the need to consider the possibility of future subplinian or phreatomagmatic events in hazard management plans, with any potential risk compounded by Ascension’s small size 41 and remote location.
    • Career education: every teacher has a role

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Education Services Australia, 2021)
      This paper provides an overview of the role that teachers can play in career education.
    • Moments, not minutes: The nature-wellbeing relationship

      Richardson, Miles; Passmore, Holli-Anne; Lumber, Ryan; Thomas, Rory; Hunt, Alex; University of Derby; National Trust (University of Waikato, 2021-01-31)
      A wealth of literature has evidenced the important role that the greater-than-human natural environment plays in our mental health and wellbeing (reviews by Bratman et al., 2019; Capaldi et al., 2014, 2015; Pritchard et al., 2019). Spending time in nature, engaging with nature directly and indirectly, and a strong sense of nature connectedness (a psychological/emotional connection with nature) have each been shown to positively impact wellbeing. Few studies, however, have examined the importance that various nature-related factors have on our wellbeing when examined in concert with each other, with none including factors of nature connection and engagement. In the current study, using a national United Kingdom sample of 2,096 adults, we provide new insights into this gap in the literature. Our primary focus was on examining, when considered simultaneously, the patterns and relative predictive importance to hedonic wellbeing (i.e., happiness), eudaimonic wellbeing (i.e., worthwhile life), illbeing (i.e., depression and anxiety), and general physical health of five nature-related factors: (1) nature connectedness, (2) time in nature, (3) engagement with nature through simple everyday activities, (4) indirect engagement with nature, and (5) knowledge and study of nature. A consistent pattern of results emerged across multiple analytical approaches (i.e., correlations, linear regression, dominance analyses, commonality analysis), wherein time in nature was not the main (or significant) predictive nature-related factor for wellbeing. Rather, nature connectedness and engaging with nature through simple activities (e.g., smelling flowers) consistently emerged as being the significant and prominent factors in predicting and explaining variance in mental health and wellbeing. Implications for practical application and policy/programme planning are discussed.
    • Nature Engagement for Human and Nature’s Wellbeing during the Corona Pandemic

      Richardson, Miles; Hamlin, Iain; University of Derby (Emerald, 2021-05-28)
      To explore the associations between noticing nature, nature connectedness, time in nature and human and nature’s wellbeing during the Corona pandemic restrictions. Natural England’s People and Nature Survey (PANS) data (n=4206) from the UK was used to assess a number of wellbeing outcomes (loneliness, life satisfaction, worthwhile life and happiness) and pro-nature behaviours as a function of longer-term physical time in nature and psychological connectedness to nature and shorter-term visits and noticing of nature. Longer-term factors of nature connectedness and time in nature were both consistent significant predictors of wellbeing measures (apart from loneliness) and pro-nature conservation behaviours. Considered alone short-term visits and noticing were again consistent and significant predictors of three wellbeing measures, but recent visits to nature were not associated with pro-nature conservation behaviours. A combined regression highlighted the importance of a longer-term relationship with nature in all outcomes apart from loneliness, but also revealed that, even when considered in concert with longer-term factors, currently noticing nature had a role in feeling one’s life was worthwhile, pro-nature behaviours and loneliness. The closeness of the human-nature relationship and noticing nature have rarely been examined in concert with nature visits. Further, the reciprocal benefits of pro-nature behaviours are often overlooked.
    • Quality assurance for operating room illumination through lean six sigma

      Ozturkoglu, Y; Kazancoglu, Y; Sagnak, M; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Yasar University, Universite Caddesi, Bornova, Izmir, Turkey; Izmir Kâtip Celebi University, Balatcik Kampusu, Cigli, Izmir, Turkey; University of Derby (International Journal of Mathematical, Engineering and Management Sciences, India, 2021-06)
      Since every mistake made in the healthcare industry can cause permanent harm or even death, some fundamental requirements should be considered when planning and designing operating rooms. Lighting is one of the most important ergonomic factors, especially for operating rooms. This paper investigates the integration of the lean approach and six sigma in measuring the efficiency of LED technology, which can also be regarded as a factor affecting the operating room efficiency. Measurement System Analysis (MSA) and Gage Control methods were applied to determine measurement variability in operating room illumination measurement process. Repeatability and reproducibility (%R&R) was found 12.89%. After calibration, %R&R value was found 8.21%, which implies that calibration helped reduce variability.
    • Understanding parents’ contribution to young people’s career decision-making

      Clark, Lewis; Moore, Nicki; University of Derby (Career Development Institute, 2021-04-01)
      This article summarises Erasumus funded research to establish the impacts on young people's career decsion making. The article presents data pertaining to parental influence.
    • Exploring factors having an impact on attitudes and motivations towards volunteering in the undergraduate nursing student population − A comparative study of the UK and Ghana

      Dyson, Sue E.; Korsah, K.A.; Liu, L.Q.; O’Driscoll, M.; van den Akker, O.B.A; University of Derby; University of Ghana; Middlesex University (Elsevier, 2021-04-10)
      This study explores attitudes and motivations towards volunteering in nursing students in Ghana compared with nursing students in the United Kingdom (UK). Ghana traditionally follows a western model of nurse education, with students studying programmes commensurate in theory and practice, making Ghana a suitable location for a comparative study. We explored similarities and differences in attitudes and motivation towards volunteering to challenge and inform our common place practice towards nursing pedagogy. Ghanaian students displayed positive attitudes towards volunteering, although these did not translate into increased motivation to volunteer while at university. Students reported financial constraints as reasons for not volunteering as did UK students, although Ghanaian students used available resources for daily living expenses, whereas UK students prioritised available resources to pay down student debt. Structured volunteering was absent from both Ghanaian and UK nursing programmes, despite its potential to increase the variety of social groups or situations to which students are exposed, to increase self-confidence and to encourage greater reflection on practice through doing. Structural challenges within countries may provide a better explanation of variation in student motivation towards volunteering, than cross-cultural variation in attitudes towards volunteering between countries.
    • Opinions of small and medium UK construction companies on environmental management systems

      Bailey, Matthew; Booth, Colin A; Horry, Rosemary; Vidalakis, Christos; Mahamadu, Abdul-Majeed; Awuah, Kwasi Gyau Baffour; University of Derby; University of the West of England; University of Salford (Thomas Telford Ltd, 2021-02-16)
      Pressure to reduce the environmental impact of construction activities has increased, such that a paradigm shift is required. This paper presents stakeholder opinions of environmental management systems as a means for the construction industry to respond to these issues. Using a previous approach, the views of small and medium construction companies were sought, using questionnaires to ask respondents to reveal their perceived benefits of and barriers to implementing the ISO 14000 suite of environmental management standards in the UK. Detailed statistical analysis showed that environmental management systems can sometimes produce quantifiable benefits to organisations in terms of cost reduction. However, from a contractor’s view, the greatest benefit was a reduction in environmental impact outweighing financial benefits. Findings also demonstrated numerous barriers to an organisation exist, both internal and external, regarding adoption and use of environmental management systems. The most critical barrier was that cost savings do not always balance with the expense of implementation. Furthermore, waste minimisation at the design stage is viewed as most important. In general, the opinions gauged in this study indicated that short-term profits are normally considered more imperative than long-term gains. Therefore, despite a need to focus on developing strategies for removing or reducing the challenges of environmental management systems, the reality is that they may not be the panacea to sustainable development, as is often touted.
    • A readiness self-assessment model for implementing Green Lean Initiatives

      Cherrafi, Anass; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Belhadi, Amine; Kamble, S.S; Elbaz, Jamal; Moulay Ismail University, Meknes, Morocco; University of Derby; Cadi Ayyad University, Marrakech, Morocco; EDHEC Business School, Roubaix, 59057, France; ENCG –Agadir, Ibn Zohr University, Agadir, Morocco (Elsevier, 2021-05-07)
      This paper proposes a self-assessment model to evaluate the level of readiness of organizations to implement Green Lean initiatives. A systematic literature review was conducted to synthesize the key elements of the implementation of Green Lean, barriers and its critical success factors. The proposed instrument was validated through semi-structured interviews and workshops with experts from academia and industry and applied in four manufacturing companies in a developing country. The results revealed that the proposed self-assessment model is an appropriate instrument to determine the readiness of organizations for effectively implementing Green Lean. The proposed self-assessment model was able to display the potential challenges a company will face if it aims to integrate Green and Lean and implement it. The results of this paper will help the practitioners to conduct a diagnostic of requirements for Green Lean adoption, thereby increasing the probability of success of such an initiative before a company spends its resources on the project. Consequently, this paper will contribute to encouraging the effective implementation of Green Lean initiatives and serving as implications for further exploration and contribution to this area.
    • Training careers professionals: Underpinning research for the C-Course programme.

      Hooley, Tristram; Schulstok, Torild; University of Derby; Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences (Inland Norway University of Applied Science, 2021)
      This report sets out the findings of research conducted in the Czech Republic, Norway, Slovakia and Poland to underpin the development of a new professional e-learning programme for careers practitioners. The recommendations are based on a review of the literature, desk research in each of the countries, expert interviews and practitioner focus groups. Overall, the research finds that: 1. there is a clear demand for an e-learning course for careers practitioners across the four countries. The e-learning should: 2. be clearly articulated in a way that clarifies who should engage with it and why; 3. be flexible to ensure that a wide range of practitioners can access and benefit from it; 4. include interaction with others and foster a community of practice; and 5. make use of a range of technologies by using multi-media and interactive tools. In terms of content, the training should include: 6. clarification of the key terminology and definitions with the field; 7. an overview different approaches to delivering careers services; 8. how to work with a range of different sectors and different client groups; 9. how to work more systemically e.g. with families, communities and organisations; 10. knowledge about the education system, labour market and the research skills required to gather this information for yourself; 11. support for those who are undergoing the training to become professionals and adopt healthy, ethical, reflective, and context-aware practice; and 12. an overview of key theories and evidence for more advanced practitioners.