• Lean readiness within emergency departments: A conceptual framework

      Al-Najem, Mohammed; Garza-Reyes, J.A.; Antony, J.; University of Derby (Emerald, 2019)
      The purpose of this study was to develop a framework to assess the lean readiness within emergency departments (EDs) and identify the key quality practices deemed essential for lean system (LS) implementation. An extensive review of lean healthcare literature was conducted, including LS implementation within the healthcare sector (both generally and in EDs), best ED quality practices, essential factors for LS implementation within healthcare, and lean readiness assessment frameworks. The authors identified six main categories from a literature review (top management and leadership, human resources, patient relations, supplier relations, processes, and continuous improvement), and validated these based on experts’ opinion. Several factors were identified as crucial for EDs, including top management and leadership, human resources, patient relations, supplier relations, processes, and continuous improvement. The framework has not yet been tested, which prevents the author from declaring it fit for EDs. To the author’s knowledge, this is the first lean readiness assessment framework for EDs and one of the few lean readiness assessment frameworks in the literature.
    • Parents’ experiences of having an excessively crying baby and implications for support services

      Garratt, Rosemary; Bamber, Deborah; Powell, Charlotte; Long, Jaqui; Brown, Jayne; Turney, Nicy; Chessman, Jo; Dyson, Sue; St James-Roberts, Ian; De Montfort University; University of Sheffield; University of Derby; University College London (Mark Allen Group (MAGonline), 2019-03)
      Evidence suggests that around 20% of healthy babies cry for long periods without apparent reason, causing significant distress to parents and a range of adverse outcomes. This study explored parents’ experiences of having an excessively crying baby and their suggestions for improved NHS support. Focus groups and interviews with 20 parents identified three key themes: disrupted expectations and experiences of parenthood; stigma and social isolation; seeking support and validation of experience. Parents experienced shock, anxiety and a sense of failure, leading to self-imposed isolation and a reluctance to seek help. Other people’s reactions sometimes reinforced their feelings. Parents need more support, including from health professionals, to cope with excessive crying, and recommendations for this support are given.
    • Workforce needs of the career development sector in the UK

      Neary, Siobhan; Priestley, Peter; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS); University of Derby (Career Development Institute University of Derby, 2018-11-01)
      The research utilised an online survey circulated widely through the networks of both organisations. Responses were received from 59 employing organisations, representing the four countries in the UK. 64% of responses came from larger career providers employing more than 40 staff. The respondents represented employers providing services to young people, adults, all-age, FE and a small number of HE providers. The research presents a snap shot in time which suggests that pay and conditions, geography and access to affordable training are impacting on the skills and capability of the sector. Recruitment issues, ageing workforce and technology are perceived as the greatest challenges to the career development field at the present.
    • Careers leadership in practice: a study of 27 careers leaders in English secondary schools

      Andrews, David; Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2019-04-01)
      Historically, responsibility for career education and guidance in English schools was shared between the school and an external careers service. The Education Act 2011 transferred responsibility for career guidance to schools. Andrews and Hooley (2017) argued that for schools to successfully manage these new arrangements they require a ‘careers leader’. In this article, we report on research in 27 English state schools and multi-academy trusts where careers leadership currently exists. This research broadly endorses Andrews and Hooley’s typology of careers leadership tasks with the addition of a new task around securing funding. However, it is noted that the way in which these tasks are organised varies, with five models of careers leadership evident. The advantages and potential challenges of each model are outlined and implications for the training and professional development of careers leaders are discussed.
    • Exploring lean manufacturing practices' influence on process innovation performance

      Möldner, A.K., Garza-Reyes, J.A., Kumar, V.; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2018-10-17)
      Little is known about the effects of lean manufacturing practices on the process innovation performance of manufacturing organisations. This research aims to fill this gap and explore the aforementioned interdependency. A research framework consisting of 22 measurement scales and three pairs of hypotheses was developed based on an extensive literature review. A large-scale self-administered questionnaire was distributed among appropriately selected industrial experts. Datasets obtained from 340 usable responses were analysed through confirmatory factor analysis, descriptive statistics, correlations, and multiple linear regression models. The findings suggest that both technical and human lean practices have a moderate to strong positive impact on the input and occurrence of incremental and radical process innovation in manufacturing organisations. In turn, as an output of process innovation, this appears to enhance companies' operational performance. Thereby, the results dispel the scholarly and managerial misconception that LM and innovation are difficult to coexist.
    • Singing for people with Parkinson's disease

      Irons, J. Yoon; coren, Esther; Young, Megan K; Stewart, Donald E; Gschwandtner, Manfred; Mellick, George D; Health and Social Care Research Centre, University of Derby; Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre, Griffith University, Australia (Cochrane, 2019-01-19)
      To compare the efficacy and effectiveness of singing interventions with non‐singing intervention or usual care on QoL, wellbeing, and speech and communication among people with PD. We will assess the QoL and the physical, psychological, and social health and wellbeing of people with PD who receive a singing intervention, compared to non‐singing intervention or usual care.
    • The relationship between lean and environmental performance: practices and measures

      Dieste, M., Panizzolo, R., Garza-Reyes, J.A., Anosike, A.I.; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2019-03-23)
      Lean production has emerged in the past decades as one of the most popular themes in the business and manufacturing literature as it is the most extended production paradigm currently applied in industry. The lean approach is characterized by five principles (value, mapping the value stream, flow, pull and continuous improvement) that facilitate the reduction of waste (muda). In parallel, the environmental performance of a company in terms of pollution prevention, reduction and use/waste of resources is an issue increasingly concerning companies and customers in recent years. The focus on these issues has spurred an area of research that is commonly known as green production. Lean and green production concepts are both focused on waste reduction, and several authors have studied their relationships (commonalities and divergences) and the synergic effects of integrating these two management approaches. This research conducts a literature review in order to: (1) identify if firms which have applied lean principles and methods have improved their environmental measures; (2) highlight the environmental measures that are positively affected by lean practices adoption; and finally (3) underline the most important lean practices in relation to impacting environmental performance. The results are condensed in a final matrix that links some key lean practices to specific environmental measures. This matrix is of great interest for both researchers and practitioners since it suggests some possible relationships between various lean practices and the improvement of specific green performances. The findings give light regarding the state-of-the-art relationships between the lean and green production approaches.
    • Prediction of financial distress for multinational corporations: Panel estimations across countries.

      Apergis, Nicholas; Bhattacharya, Mita; Inekwe, John; University of Piraeus; Monash University; Macquarie University (Taylor & Francis, 2019-03-21)
      This research predicts ex-ante financial distress and analyses the link between financial distress, performance, employment, and research and development (R&D) investment in the case of multinational companies (MNCs). The conditional logit and hazard models are employed to predict financial distress, while a conditional mixed process model is employed to obtain consistent and efficient estimates. Financial distress generates contractions in performance, employment, and R&D investment. Hedging against risk mitigates the effect of financial distress on R&D. Our findings vary across countries, for example, we find MNCs in Canada, Israel and the U.S. benefit from hedging against risk. The findings also indicate that ex-ante financial distress is detrimental to employment for Canada, the U.K., the Netherlands and the U.S. The findings indicate the MNCs play different roles across countries in contributing jobs, investment in R&D during the distress period.
    • Measuring operational excellence: an operational excellence profitability (OEP) approach.

      Gólcher-Barguil, L.A.; Nadeem, S.P.; Garza-Reyes, J.A.; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2019-03-08)
      The pursuit of operational excellence in the manufacturing industry is at rise, but its measurement still lacks of appropriate indicators to determine its financial benefits. The ambiguity is due to the impact arisen from manufacturing fluctuations such as price and cost, production mix, and direct and indirect parameters variations. Manufacturing fluctuations distort the cost benefit of operational excellence. This paper therefore proposes the OEP (Operational Excellence Profitability) indicators to isolate the impact of manufacturing fluctuation, and distinctly identify the payback of operational excellence strategies and initiatives through cost benefits of achieving higher efficiency and yield. The paper presents the conceptual and mathematical development of the proposed OEP indicators and the formulas used for their calculation. Hypothetical and industrial-based investigations and applications of the OEP indicators are conducted for their validation. The results obtained from the hypothetical exercise and industrial case suggest that OEP indicators can provide an effective cost benefit analysis of operational excellence. This would contribute in providing manufacturing organisations with more complete information regarding the performance of their processes, which will allow their directors and managers to take better decisions related to the management and improvement of their processes.
    • Building routines for non-routine events: Supply chain resilience learning mechanisms and their antecedents.

      Scholten, Kirstin; Sharkey Scott, Pamela; Fynes, Brian; University College Dublin; University of Groningen; Dublin City University (Emerald., 2019)
      Organisations must build resilience to be able to deal with disruptions or non-routine events in their supply chains. While learning is implicit in definitions of supply chain resilience, there is little understanding of how exactly organisations can adapt their routines to build resilience. The aim of this study is to address this gap. An in-depth qualitative case study based on 28 interviews across five companies exploring learning to build supply chain resilience. This study uncovers six learning mechanisms and their antecedents that foster supply chain resilience. The learning mechanisms identified suggest that, through knowledge creation within an organisation and knowledge transfer across the supply chain and broader network of stakeholders, operating routines are built and/ or adapted both intentionally and unintentionally during three stages of a supply chain disruption: preparation, response and recovery. This study shows how the impact of a supply chain disruption may be reduced by intentional and unintentional learning in all three disruption phases. By being aware of the antecedents of unintentional learning organisations can more consciously adapt routines. Furthermore, findings highlight the potential value of additional attention to knowledge transfer, particularly in relation to collaborative and vicarious learning across the supply chain and broader network of stakeholders not only in preparation for, but also in response to and recovery from disruptions. This study contributes novel insights about how learning leads both directly and indirectly to the evolution of operating routines that help an organisation and its supply chains to deal with disruptions. Results detail six specific learning mechanisms for knowledge creation and knowledge transfer and their antecedents for building supply chain resilience. In doing so, this study provides new fine grained theoretical insights about how supply chain resilience can be improved through all three phases of a disruption. Propositions are developed for theory development.
    • Horizons

      Hall, Mark; University of Derby (SACI Florence, 2016-06-04)
    • Application of ultrasound in the assessment of plantar fascia in patients with plantar fasciitis: a systematic review

      Mohseni-Bandpei, Mohammad Ali; Nakhaee, Masoomeh; Mousavi, Mohammad Ebrahim; Shakourirad, Ali; Safari, Mohammad Reza; Vahab Kashani, Reza; University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences (Elsevier, 2014-05-03)
      Plantar fasciitis (PFS) is one of the most common causes of heel pain, estimated to affect 10% of the general population during their lifetime. Ultrasound (US) imaging technique is increasingly being used to assess plantar fascia (PF) thickness, monitor the effect of different interventions and guide therapeutic interventions in patients with PFS. The purpose of the present study was to systematically review previously published studies concerning the application of US in the assessment of PF in patients with PFS. A literature search was performed for the period 2000-2012 using the Science Direct, Scopus, PubMed, CINAHL, Medline, Embase and Springer databases. The key words used were: ultrasound, sonography, imaging techniques, ultrasonography, interventional ultrasonography, plantar fascia and plantar fasciitis. The literature search yielded 34 relevant studies. Sixteen studies evaluated the effect of different interventions on PF thickness in patients with PFS using US; 12 studies compared PF thickness between patients with and without PFS using US; 6 studies investigated the application of US as a guide for therapeutic intervention in patients with PFS. There were variations among studies in terms of methodology used. The results indicated that US can be considered a reliable imaging technique for assessing PF thickness, monitoring the effect of different interventions and guiding therapeutic interventions in patients with PFS.
    • The prototype of a thermoregulatory system for measurement and control of temperature inside prosthetic socket

      Ghoseiri, Kamiar; Zheng, Yong Ping; Hing, Louis Lee Tat; Safari, Mohammad Reza; Leung, Aaron KL; University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences (SAGE, 2015-06-11)
      Thermal related problems with prostheses are common complaints of amputee people. This article aims to introduce a thermoregulatory technique as a potential solution for those problems in prostheses wearers. A smart thermoregulatory system was designed, manufactured, and installed on a phantom model of a prosthetic socket. It captured temperature data from 16 sensors positioned at the interface between the phantom model and a silicone liner and used their average for comparison with a defined set temperature to select required heating or cooling functions for thermal equilibrium. A thin layer of Aluminum was used to transfer temperature between thermal pump and different sites around the phantom model. The feasibility of this thermoregulatory technique was confirmed by its ability to provide thermal equilibrium. Further investigations to improve the design of thermoregulatory system are necessary including temperature transfer element and power consumption based on thermal capacity and thermal inertia of the residual limb. The smart thermoregulatory system by providing thermal equilibrium between two sides of a prosthetic silicone liner can control residual limb skin temperature and sweating. Consequently, it can improve quality of life in amputee people.
    • Challenges to recruitment for the career development sector

      Neary, Siobhan; International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) (Career Development Institute, 2018-10)
      In spring 2018 the Career Development Institute (CDI) together with the International Centre for Guidance Studies (iCeGS) at the University of Derby undertook research with employers in the career development sector to assess current workforce needs. This was prompted by anecdotal evidence suggesting a shortage of careers professionals and challenges to recruitment in many areas of the UK. This research suggests that pay and conditions, geography and access to affordable training are impacting on the skills and capability of the sector.
    • Yaoundé-like virus in resident wild bird, Ghana

      Williams, Richard A. J.; Vázquez, Ana; Asante, Ivy; Bonney, Kofi; Odoom, Shirley; Puplampu, Naiki; Ampofo, William; Sánchez-Seco, María Paz; Tenorio, Antonio; Peterson, A. Townsend; University of Kansas Biodiversity Institute, 1345 Jayhawk Blvd, Lawrence, Kansas, USA; Departamento de Zoología y Antropología Física, Complutense Universidad, Madrid 28040, Spain; Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Institute of Health Carlos III, Majadahonda, Spain; Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research, Accra, Ghana (Academic journals, 2012-03-09)
      Tissue and swab samples from 551 wild birds collected in Ghana (October-November 2007) were assayed for alphaviruses, flaviviruses, and influenza A viruses using polymerase chain (PCR) techniques. One pool sample tested positive for Flavivirus RNA; further testing revealed that the amplified sequence was Yaoundé virus (YAOV), or closely related to it. YAOV is an apparently rare Flavivirus closely related to medically important human pathogens Japanese Encephalitis virus and West Nile virus. It is known only from West Africa. This is the first detection from Ghana, and only the second detection from a bird. Samples were negative for alphaviruses and Influenza A virus.
    • Avian influenza infections in non-migratant land birds in Andean Peru

      Williams, Richard A. J.; Segovia-Hinostroza, Karen; Ghersi, Bruno M.; Gonzaga, Victor; Peterson, A. Townsend; Montgomery, Joel M.; Biodiversity Institute, 1345 Jayhawk Blvd., University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66045, USA; Departamento de Zoologı´a y Antropologıa Fısica, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, C/Jose Antonio Novais, 2 Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid, Spain; Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria de Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Av. Circunvalacion Cdra. 28 San Borja, Lima, Peru; United States Naval Medical Research Center Detachment, Unit 6, Av. Venezuela Cdra. 36, Callao 2, Lima, Peru (Wildlife Disease Association, 2012-06-13)
      As part of ongoing surveillance for avian influenza viruses (AIV) in Peruvian birds, in June 2008, we sampled 600 land birds of 177 species, using real-time reverse-transcription PCR. We addressed the assumption that AIV prevalence is low or nil among land birds, a hypothesis that was not supported by the results—rather, we found AIV infections at relatively high prevalences in birds of the orders Apodiformes (hummingbirds) and Passeriformes (songbirds). Surveillance programs for monitoring spread and identification of AIV should thus not focus solely on water birds.
    • Are shocks to natural gas consumption temporary or permanent? Evidence from a panel of U.S. states

      Apergis, Nicholas; Loomis, David; Payne, James; University of Piraeus; Illinois State University; Illinois State University (Elsevier, 2010-08)
      This short communication examines whether or not U.S. natural gas consumption follows a stationary process. Unlike previous research that has focused on regional country or industrial sector-based panel studies, this study undertakes a sub-national investigation of natural gas consumption for the 50 U.S. states. Levin et al. (2002), Im et al. (2003), Maddala and Wu (1999), and Hadri (2000) panel unit root and stationarity tests reveal that natural gas consumption is integrated of order one. However, once allowance is made for endogenously determined structural breaks, the Carrion-i-Silvestre et al. (2005), Im et al. (2005), and Westerlund (2005) panel unit root and stationarity tests indicate that natural gas consumption is integrated of order zero. Discussion of the structural breaks is briefly surveyed in relation to the natural gas industry’s response to legislative actions.
    • 'An Asseblage of Habits' : D.J. Waldie and Neil Campbell - A Suburban Conversation

      Neil Campbell; University of Derby (2011)
      I edited this special edition on western suburbia, selected the images and interviewed the writer D.J. Waldie for the journal.
    • Food price volatility and macroeconomic factor volatility: 'heat waves' or 'meteor showers'?

      Apergis, Nicholas; Rezitis, Antonios; University of Ioannina; University of Ioannina (Taylor & Francis, 2010-10-06)
      This paper investigates volatility spillover effects between relative food prices and explicit macroeconomic fundamentals, i.e. exchange rates, money balances, inflation, and the deficit to income ratio, through the methodology of GARCH models. The findings showed that significant and positive macroeconomic volatility effects influence the volatility of relative food prices. Moreover, the volatility of relative food prices exerts a positive and statistically significant impact on its own volatility. The results imply that the participation of Greece in EMU will diminish the volatility of those macroeconomic factors, implying lower volatility in food prices and thus higher benefits for both producers and consumers.
    • International technology spillovers, human capital and productivity linkages: evidence from the industrial sector

      Apergis, Nicholas; Economidou, Claire; Filippidis, Ioannis; University of Piraeus; University of Utrecht; Aristotelian University of Thessaloniki (Springer, 2009-11)
      The paper estimates an empirical model that is consistent with a variety of Research and Development (R&D)-driven models of growth where technology is transmitted via trade to other industries, both domestically and internationally, by being embodied in differentiated intermediate goods. The evidence is based on data from 21 manufacturing industries in six European Union countries for the period 1980–1997. The contribution of the paper lies in showing how by including human capital in the model and employing suitable econometric procedures the magnitude of R&D spillovers reported in the existing literature can be affected, while pointing to a major role of human capital in economic growth process.