• An analysis of managerial factors affecting the implementation and use of overall equipment effectiveness.

      Binti Aminuddin, Nur Ainunnazli; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Kumar, Vikas; Antony, Jiju; Rocha-Lona, Luis; University of Warwick; University of Derby; University of the West of England; University of Edinburgh; National Polytecnic Institute of Mexico (Taylor and Francis, 2015-06-15)
      To ensure manufacturing organisations remain competitive, most of them are turning to total productive maintenance (TPM) and lean manufacturing to ensure seamless operations. Overall equipment effectiveness (OEE) is the foundation of these two business improvement strategies as it tackles the underlying losses that impede equipment efficiency. This study presents the prevalence of managerial issues related to the implementation and use of OEE in the manufacturing industry. To do this, five hypotheses and four research questions were formulated and tested using a combination of descriptive statistics and cross-tabulation, chi-square, analysis of variance, Tukey’s pairwise comparison, Z-test and correlation tests. Data were collected through a survey questionnaire responded by 139 manufacturing organisations worldwide. The results establish, among other ‘soft’ aspects, the linkage of the OEE implementation with that of TPM and lean manufacturing, and the drivers, most critical factors, barriers and the role of management in its implementation. The study also identifies how manufacturing organisations employ the information provided by OEE and how the data for its computation are collected. This study supports the very limited empirical research on the implementation and use of OEE. Thus, this research provides organisations, and their managers, with a better understanding of different factors that affect the successful deployment and management of this highly used measure in industry.
    • Assessing the key enablers for industry 4.0 adoption using MICMAC analysis: a case study

      Krishnan, S., Gupta, S., Kaliyan, M., Kumar, V., Garza-Reyes, J.A.; Amity University, Noida, India; Thiagarajar School of Management, Madurai, India; University of the West of England; University of Derby (Emerald, 2021-03-23)
      The aim of this research is to assess the key enablers of Industry 4.0 (I4.0) in the context of the Indian automobile industry. It is done to apprehend their comparative effect on executing Industry 4.0 concepts and technology in manufacturing industries, in a developing country context. The progression to Industry 4.0 grants the opportunity for manufacturers to harness the benefits of this industry generation. Literature related to Industry 4.0 has been reviewed for the identification of key enablers of Industry 4.0. The enablers were further verified by academic professionals. Additionally, key executive insights had been revealed by using interpretive structural modelling (ISM) model for the vital enablers unique to the Indian scenario. We have also applied MICMAC analysis, to group the enablers of I4.0. The analysis of our data from respondents using ISM provided us with 7 levels of enabler framework. Our study adds to the existing literature on industry 4.0 enablers and findings highlight the specificities of the territories in India context. Our results show that top management is the major enabler to I4.0 implementation. Infact, it occupies the 7th layer of the ISM framework. Subsequently, government policies enable substantial support to develop smart factories in India. The findings of our work provides implementers of I4.0 in the automobile industry in the form of a robust framework. This framework can be followed by the automobile sector in enhancing their competency in the competitive market and ultimately provide a positive outcome for the Indian economic development led by these businesses. Furthermore, our work will guide decision-makers in enabling strategic integration of Industry 4.0, opening doors for the development of new business opportunities as well. The study proposes a framework for Indian automobile industries. The automobile sector was chosen for this study as it covers a large percentage of the market share of the manufacturing industry in India. Existing literature does not address the broader picture of I4.0 and most papers do not provide validation of the data collected. Our study thus addresses this research gap.
    • Benchmarking of cleaner production in sand mould casting companies

      Guilherme da Silva, H; Espíndola Ferreira, J.C; Vikas, K; Garza-Reyes, J.A.; Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, Brazil; University of the West of England; University of Derby (Emerald, 2020-04-29)
      The purpose of this research was to develop new sustainability indicators consistent with the sand mould casting industry, through Benchmarking of Cleaner Production (CP), in order to identify the levels of practice and performance of companies of the casting sector. In addition, a lean manufacturing checklist was specified in order to verify the presence of lean manufacturing techniques employed to eliminate waste towards CP. No previous work was found in the literature that attempts to assess practices and performance of companies performing sand mould casting (a significantly polluting manufacturing process) in the context of cleaner production and lean manufacturing. For the application of this benchmarking, nine companies from the sand mould casting sector were studied, where the profile of each company was analysed through 8 variables and 47 indicators. Data were obtained through face-to-face visits and questionnaire application in the companies, and the data were analysed both quantitatively and qualitatively. The results obtained were the diagnosis of companies' practices and performance resulting from their position in the benchmarking charts, as well as the identification of the areas in which companies should implement improvements aiming at achieving CP. This research was developed specifically for sand mould casting companies, and each process has its own characteristics. 14 companies that perform sand mould casting were invited to participate in this survey, but unfortunately five companies declined to participate. It is important to diagnose casting companies regarding cleaner production practices, performance and deployment potential. Thus, important negative issues in the company can be identified and, with this information, they can develop actions focused on cases that need more attention. In addition, this work contributes to evaluate the relationship and efficiency of improvement actions developed by companies in the context of both lean manufacturing and cleaner production, aiming to reduce or eliminate the environmental impact. The improvement of practices and performance of a company regarding cleaner production is considered to be beneficial to supply chain management in the context of sustainability, as the other participating companies are likely to seek ways to reduce environmental impact, and the diagnostics provided by this work may also be used by those companies.
    • Benchmarking of sustainability to assess practices and performances of the management of the end of life cycle of electronic products: a study of Brazilian manufacturing companies

      Gonçalves da Costa, L., Espíndola Ferreira, J.C., Kumar, V., Garza-Reyes, J.A.; Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil; University of the West of England; University of Derby (Springer, 2020-09-22)
      The relentless pursuit of lower production costs causes companies to invest in more efficient production systems so that they can remain economically competitive, while the actions focusing on more sustainable operations from an environmental point of view are usually performed to meet the political government regulating environmental control. However, it is common for companies to focus their efforts to minimize the environmental impacts at an early stage of the product life cycle, neglecting sustainability management in the post-use phase. Given the context, this study seeks to develop sustainability indicators that can be used by the electronics industry to assess the level of practice and performance during production that are related to product recovery after the use phase, in order to better understand how companies are acting to reduce the environmental impacts of their products at the end of their life cycle. Initially, critical success factors related to environmental management of the product’s end-of-life are obtained. Then, some of those critical success factors are prioritized, giving rise to the indicators of sustainability used in the benchmarking method. Benchmarking was performed in electronics Brazilian companies, and the data was obtained by means of a questionnaire and interviews. It is concluded from the results that the proposed indicators are suitable for measuring the levels of practices and performance of the participant companies in environmental management at the end of the product life cycle as the indicators were able to portray faithfully the reality of each company.
    • Building quality management systems: selecting the right methods and tools.

      Rocha-Lona, L.; Garza-Reyes, J.A.; Kumar, V.; University of Derby; University of the West of England (CRC Press, 2013-06-25)
      Quality has quickly become one of the most important decision-making factors for consumers. And although organizations invest considerable resources into building the right quality management systems (QMSs), in many instances, the adoption of such quality improvement tools are just not enough. Building Quality Management Systems: Selecting the Right Methods and Tools explains exactly what directors, practitioners, consultants, and researchers must do to make better choices in the design, implementation, and improvement of their QMSs. Based on the authors’ decades of industrial experience working on business improvement projects for multinationals looking to design or improve their QMSs, the book discusses building QMSs based on two important organizational elements: needs and resources. It begins with an overview of QMSs and systems thinking and the impact of QMSs on financial performance. Illustrating the process management approach, it reviews the most well-known business and quality improvement models, methods, and tools that support a major QMS. The authors introduce their own time-tested methodology for designing, implementing, and enhancing your own QMS. Using their proven method, you will learn how to: - Implement a strategic quality plan based on your specific needs, capabilities, cost–benefits, policies, and business strategies - Select the right models, methods, and tools to be adopted as part of your QMS - Understand the critical success factors and implementation challenges - Evaluate the level of maturity of your QMS and your implementation efforts Highlighting the importance of quality as a way of life, this book supplies the understanding you’ll need to make the right choices in the development and deployment of your QMS. With a clear focus on business performance and process management, it provides the basis for creating the quality management culture required to become a world-class organization.
    • The challenges of GSCM implementation in the UK manufacturing SMEs.

      Kumar, Vikas; Sabri, Shahruzzaman; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Nadeem, Simon Peter; Kumari, Archana; Akkaranggoon, Supalak; University of the West of England; University of Warwick; Khon Kaen University; University of Derby (IEEE, 2019-01-31)
      The importance of green supply chain management has long attracted the interest of both researchers and practitioners in the industry. As environmental concerns are becoming one of the major issues discussed in the 21st century, countries with manufacturing as its principal economy contributor are always on the lookout for innovations and new approaches to balance both environmental considerations and profit making. The UK, being one of the top manufacturing countries in the world already considered green initiatives among their manufacturers. According to reports from the industry, large and international manufacturing companies from the UK have successfully implemented some green initiatives with significant improvements across the supply chain. However, the adoption of green initiatives is mainly focused on large companies rather the real backbone of the UK manufacturing industry, which is the small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). This paper therefore sets out to determine the implementation level of green supply chain among the SMEs. The paper adopts a mixed methods based approach and findings are based on 57 survey responses and 5 semi-structured interviews from UK manufacturing SMEs. The findings show that the level of GSCM implementation among the UK manufacturing SMEs is low compared to large organisations. Cost of implementing GSCM practices emerged as a key challenge faced by the UK manufacturing SMEs which was followed by the lack of knowledge within the organisation. This study thus adds to the limited literature on the manufacturing SMEs and provides evidence from the UK manufacturing sector on the adoption of GSCM practices.
    • A circularity measurement toolkit for manufacturing SMEs.

      Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Valls, Ailin Salomé; Nadeem, Simon Peter; Anosike, Anthony; Kumar, Vikas; University of Derby; University of Warwick; University of the West of England (Taylor and Francis, 2018-12-24)
      The development and adoption of the concept of circular economy in the last two decades have been remarkable. However, despite its widespread adoption, little progress has been made regarding its measurement, especially in manufacturing SMEs. This paper, therefore, proposes a Circularity Measurement Toolkit (CMT) which enables the assessment of the degree of circularity in manufacturing SMEs. A conceptual CMT framework, which provided the basis for the proposed tool and that defined the different types of circular practices and a classification or levels of circularity was developed from an extensive literature reviewed. To ensure the structure’s accuracy of the proposed CMT in terms of requirements to be measured, the monitoring process and actions involved, the tool was verified through a Delphi-study. Furthermore, its practicality was validated through a case study approach in a manufacturing SME. This paper contributes by filling a gap in the CE measurement field through the proposal of the CMT. Besides providing an evaluation of the degree of circularity in the practices of manufacturing SMEs, companies can also employ the proposed CMT to identify corrective actions or future efforts for the adoption of CE practices.
    • Developing green supply chain management taxonomy-based decision support system.

      Kumar, Vikas; Holt, Diane; Ghobadian, Abby; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; University of the West of England; University of Essex; University of Reading; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2014-05-21)
      The aim of this paper is to develop a comprehensive taxonomy of green supply chain management (GSCM) practices and develop a structural equation modelling-driven decision support system following GSCM taxonomy for managers to provide better understanding of the complex relationship between the external and internal factors and GSCM operational practices. Typology and/or taxonomy play a key role in the development of social science theories. The current taxonomies focus on a single or limited component of the supply chain. Furthermore, they have not been tested using different sample compositions and contexts, yet replication is a prerequisite for developing robust concepts and theories. In this paper, we empirically replicate one such taxonomy extending the original study by (a) developing broad (containing the key components of supply chain) taxonomy; (b) broadening the sample by including a wider range of sectors and organisational size; and (c) broadening the geographic scope of the previous studies. Moreover, we include both objective measures and subjective attitudinal measurements. We use a robust two-stage cluster analysis to develop our GSCM taxonomy. The main finding validates the taxonomy previously proposed and identifies size, attitude and level of environmental risk and impact as key mediators between internal drivers, external drivers and GSCM operational practices.
    • The effect of lean methods and tools on the environmental performance of manufacturing organisations.

      Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Kumar, Vikas; Chaikittisilp, Sariya; Tan, Kim Hua; University of Derby; University of the West of England; University of Warwick; University of Nottingham (Elsevier, 2018-04-01)
      Evidence suggests that lean methods and tools have helped manufacturing organisations to achieve operational excellence, and in this way meet both traditional and contemporary organisational objectives such as profitability, efficiency, responsiveness, quality, and customer satisfaction. However, the effect of these methods and tools on environmental performance is still unclear, as limited empirical research has been conducted in this field. This paper therefore investigates the impact of five essential lean methods, i.e. JIT, autonomation, kaizen/continuous improvement, total productive maintenance (TPM) and value stream mapping (VSM), on four commonly utilised measures for the compliance of environmental performance, i.e. material use, energy consumption, non-product output, and pollutant releases. A correlation analysis modelled the relationship and effect of these lean methods on the environmental performance of 250 manufacturing organisations around the world. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was used as a second pronged verification approach to ensure the validity of the results. The results indicate that TMP and JIT have the strongest significance on environmental performance, whereas kaizen/continuous improvement only showed an effect on the use of materials and release of pollutants. Autonomation and VSM did not show any impact on environmental performance. The research holds important implications for industrialists, who can develop a richer knowledge on the relationship between lean and green. This will help them formulate more effective strategies for their simultaneous or sequential implementation. The paper extends our knowledge in the lean and green field by helping us to establish and explain the given relationships between five of the most important and commonly used lean methods and the environmental performance of manufacturing organisations. No previous research had considered the studied lean methods and environmental measures of performance.
    • An empirical analysis of supply and manufacturing risk and business performance: a Chinese manufacturing supply chain perspective.

      Kumar, Vikas; Guo, Ruizhi; Shaw, Sarah Louise; Colicchia, Claudia; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Kumari, Archana; Bak, Ozlem; University of the West of England; University of Warwick; University of Hull; et al. (Emerald, 2018)
      Purpose – This study aims to explore the importance and impact of supply and manufacturing risk management upon business performance within thecontextofChinesemanufacturingsupplychains. Design/methodology/approach – A two-phased multi-method approach was adopted, which included a survey questionnaire to practitioners in Chinese manufacturing supply chains followed by semi-structured interviews. The findings included 103 valid survey responses complemented by six semi-structuredinterviews. Findings – The results indicate that in Chinese manufacturing context supply risk and manufacturing risk management are both vital for business performance. A high correlation between business and manufacturing risk management performance exists; however, no significant impact of supplier dependency, systematic purchasing, maturity of production and supply chain and human resources was found despite previously these elements being regarded as key influencers for supply and manufacturing risk management performance. The Chinese manufacturing supply chain indicated that elements such as the supplier and customer orientation, flexibility, manufacturing and supply risk highly connotes with business performance. Practical implications – In the current unpredictable and volatile business environment, the competitiveness of manufacturing supply chains to a large extent depend on their ability to identify, assess and manage the manufacturing and supply risks. The findings of this study will assist supply chain managersintakingdecisiononmanufacturing andsupplyrisk managementandreducing theuncertaintyupontheirbusiness performance. Originality/value – The supply chain risk has been widely explored within the context of individual case studies, or standalone models focusing on either supply or manufacturing risk in supply chains; however, to what extent this has been applicable to a wider context and its impact upon business process has not been explored. Hence, this study simultaneously has analysed manufacturing risk and supply risk and its impact upon Chinese manufacturing supply chains business performance. Moreover, this study uses a combination of quantitative and qualitative methods, which is often limited in this area. Finally, the institutional theory lens offers novel insights in better understanding the factors that can affect the impact of supply and manufacturing risk management upon business performance in those contexts, such as China, where the institutional aspect presents specific features.
    • Environmental management systems in the architectural, engineering and construction sectors: a roadmap to aid the delivery of the sustainable development goals

      Horry, Rosemary; Booth, Colin; Mahamadu, Abdul-Majeed; Manu, Patrick; Georgakis, Panagiotis; University of Derby; University of the West of England; University of Manchester; University of the West of England (Springer Nature, 2021-10-24)
      Realisation of the sustainable development goals (SDGs) will provide improvements to people's lives and longevity of the planet. The architectural, engineering and construction (AEC) sectors have a potentially huge role in aiding the delivery of many SDGs; however, there appears to be a lack of research into the engagement within this sector. The leading environmental management system (EMS), ISO 14001, can enable organisations in the AEC sectors to improve their business operations, whilst minimising their impacts on the environment and improving society. Therefore, the study sets out to use institutional theory to determine the usefulness of ISO 14001 as a tool within the AEC sector and to demonstrate how the organisational benefits could facilitate the delivery of the SDGs. A stepwise PRISMA review process facilitated the compiling of academic articles and professional reports (n = 44), which enabled the creation of an inventory of the perceived benefits (n = 85) and the recognised barriers (n = 63) to implementing ISO 14001 across the AEC sectors. These barriers and benefits were confirmed by environmental practitioners as being relevant to the incorporation of an EMS. The most widely reported benefits within the AEC sectors were improving environmental performance and compliance with legislation. Lack of government pressure and lack of expertise were the most widely reported barriers, followed by cost to AEC organisations utilising an EMS. Following on from this inventory of benefits, it was possible to develop of a conceptual roadmap, which illustrates where linkages exist with the SDGs. SDG 4, 8, 12 and 13 are shown as exhibiting the most associations with the benefits. This roadmap was reviewed by AEC sector professionals who confirmed its usefulness. Therefore, it is surmised that the roadmap could aid strategic organisational sustainable planning or for organisations to demonstrate the delivery of their corporate social responsibilities.
    • Examining legitimatisation of additive manufacturing in the interplay between innovation, lean manufacturing and sustainability.

      Ghobadian, Abby; Talavera, Irene; Bhattacharya, Arijit; Kumar, Vikas; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; O'Regan, Nicholas; University of Reading; University of East Anglia; University of the West of England; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2018-06-04)
      In response to hypercompetition, globalisation and increasing consumer expectations, many manufacturing firms have embraced lean manufacturing (LM). The primary goal of LM is to reduce/eliminate waste (muda). There is broad consensus as to what constitutes waste, but not on LM implementation. Implementation is not prescriptive with each firm relying on a different combination of administrative, process and routine change / innovation. Lean manufacturing brings about incremental change relying on administrative, process and routine levers. It best fits mass production where process variability is low and demand is high and stable. Lean manufacturing can significantly reduce waste but not eliminate waste, and the attained benefits have not always lived up to expectations. Additive manufacturing (AM) promises to revolutionise manufacturing beyond recognition by eliminating or drastically removing the waste thereby achieving sustainability. But AM is at its formative stage – the space between the concept and growth - where many promising breakthrough technologies fail. To reach its full potential, it needs to achieve high-scale adoption. In this paper, we examine how AM can significantly reduce/eliminate waste and how it can deliver triple bottom line on an unprecedented scale. We contend that AM, if adopted deeply and widely, will take LM to its final frontier, but there are a number of impediments to this end. We identify legitimation as critical to its wide diffusion and develop a number of propositions expediting AM’s legitimation. Legitimation of AM will ensure its deep and broad diffusion and should this happen, waste will be a thing of the past an important stride towards sustainable future.
    • A framework to achieve sustainability in manufacturing organisations of developing economies using Industry 4.0 technologies’ enablers

      Yadav, G; Kumar, Anil; Luthra, S; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Kumar, V; Batista, L; Veermata Jijabai Technological Institute, Mumbai, India; London Metropolitan University; Ch. Ranbir Singh State Institute of Engineering and Technology, Jhajjar, Haryana, India; University of Derby; et al. (Elsevier, 2020-07-07)
      Sustainability has emerged as one of the most important issues in the international market. Ignorance of sustainability aspects has led many manufacturing organisations to face huge financial losses. It has been observed that developed nations have successfully achieved sustainability in their manufacturing sectors. However, the rate of sustainability adoption in developing nations is significantly poorer. The current business trend offers new technologies such as the Internet of Things, Big data analytics, Blockchain, Machine learning, etc. These technologies can be termed under the Industry 4.0 paradigm when considered within a manufacturing context. It is significant to notice that such new technologies directly or indirectly contribute to sustainability. So, it is necessary to explore the enablers that facilitate sustainability adoption. This study aims to develop a framework to improve sustainability adoption across manufacturing organisations of developing nations using Industry 4.0 technologies. Initially, the enablers that strongly influence sustainability adoption are identified through a literature review. Further, a large scale survey is conducted to finalise the Industry 4.0 technologies’ enablers to be included in the framework. Based on the empirical analysis, a framework is developed and tested across an Indian manufacturing case organisation. Finally, Robust Best Worst Method (RBWM) is utilised to identify the intensity of influence of each enabler included in the framework. The findings of the study reveal that managerial and economical, and environmental enablers possess a strong contribution toward sustainability adoption. The outcomes of the present study will be beneficial for researchers, practitioners, and policymakers.
    • Impact of I4.0 Technologies and their Interoperability on Performance: Future Pathways for Supply Chain Resilience Post-COVID-19

      Frederico, G.F.; Kumar, V; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Kumar, A; Agrawal, R; Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil; University of the West of England; University of Derby; London Metropolitan University; National Institute of Technology Tiruchirappalli, Tiruchirappalli, India (Emerald, 2021-10-05)
      This study aims to investigate the impact of I4.0’s technologies and their interoperability on Supply Chains (SCs) performance and how the integration of such technologies and their interoperability can create pathways for SCs resilience post-COVID-19. This is of paramount importance in the context of COVID-19 as the investigation around I4.0 technologies may provide relevant insights on how SCs may better respond to unexpected situations like the current pandemic with the use of digital technologies. A survey research method was designed based on some constructs extracted from the literature regarding the main disruptive technologies, interoperability, elements of Supply Chains Processes (SCPs) performance such as integration, collaboration, transparency, efficiency, responsiveness, and profitability. The data were collected from March-July 2020 from different regions of the world when the peak of the first wave of the pandemic had occurred. The survey resulted in 115 valid responses. The study employed a combination of descriptive, correlation and multiple regression methods to analyse the data. The study indicates that disruptive technologies significantly impact SCPs performance (integration, collaboration, responsiveness, and transparency) and their resilience. The findings did not support the notion that these technologies improve the efficiency of SCs, a significant contrast to the existing literature. Our findings also refute the existing understanding that interoperability moderates the impact of disruptive technologies on SCPs performance and enhancing the resilience of SCs. However, the findings show that the integration of I4.0 technologies and their interoperability has a positive impact on SCPs profitability. The findings strongly advocate that this integration plays an important role in improving SC performance, and a future pathway of supply chain resiliency post-COVID-19. Considering that the I4.0 trend will impact SCs in the coming years, this study brings a relevant contribution to researchers and practitioners. This study makes a unique contribution by investigating a novel causal relationship between the main elements (I4.0 technologies, interoperability, processes performance, and strategic outcomes) related to the SC in this new context.
    • The impact of lean methods and tools on the operational performance of manufacturing organisations.

      Belekoukias, Ioannis; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Kumar, Vikas; University of Warwick; University of Derby; University of the West of England (Taylor and Francis, 2014-04-07)
      Evidence suggests that lean methods and tools have helped manufacturing organisations to improve their operations and processes. However, the real effect of these methods and tools on contemporary measures of operational performance, i.e. cost, speed, dependability, quality and flexibility, is still unclear. This paper investigates the impact of five essential lean methods, i.e. JIT, autonomation, kaizen, total productive maintenance (TPM) and value stream mapping (VSM), on these measures. A linear regression analysis modelled the correlation and impact of these lean practices on the operational performance of 140 manufacturing organisations around the world. In addition, structural equation modelling (SME) was used to cross verify the findings of the regression and correlation analyses. The results indicate that JIT and automation have the strongest significance on operational performance while kaizen, TPM and VSM seem to have a lesser, or even negative, effect on it. This paper provides further evidence regarding the effects that lean practices have on the performance of organisations and thus the research offers companies, and their managers, a better understanding of the relationship between the lean strategy and the performance of their operations.
    • The impact of supply chain integration on performance: Evidence from the UK food sector

      Kumar, Vikas; Chibuzo, Esinaulo Nwakama; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Kumari, Archana; Rocha-Lona, Luis; Lopez-Torres, Gabriela Citlalli; University of the West of England; University of Warwick; University of Derby; Instituto Politécnico Nacional; et al. (Elsevier, 2017-09)
      Supply chain Integration has emerged as a major field of interest over the years that involve the strategic alignment of functions and processes within an organization. However, there have been major debates regarding the true design of the kinds of integration that would lead to performance of supply chains. This study develops a conceptual framework from the literature and defines four constructs of integration (customer, supplier, internal, and information integration) to see how this would lead to improved supply chain performance (such as production flexibility, inventory turns, order fulfillment rate, total logistics costs, and operational performance).
    • Impact of the Strategic Sourcing Process on the Supply Chain Response to the COVID-19 effects

      Frederico, G.F.; Kumar, V; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil; University of the West of England; University of Derby (Emerald, 2021-08-20)
      This research investigates the impact of the strategic sourcing process on the supply chain response to COVID-19. The paper presents practitioners' perspectives (experts in supply chain management, especially involved in the procurement field) on the strategic sourcing process's impact on the supply chain response. The study follows a survey-based approach for data collection. It uses a descriptive survey methodology where questions related to the impact of the strategic sourcing process on the supply chain response in the face of the coronavirus pandemic were explored by practitioners. In total, 130 valid responses were obtained. The results showed that the majority of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that strategic sourcing positively impacts the supply chain response amid the COVID-19 effects. Also, for the five phases of the strategic sourcing process, the majority of respondents considered them as a high and very high impact on the supply chain response. This paper provides timely insights for practitioners and academics, especially those involved in the supply chain management area, showing how the strategic sourcing process plays an important role in making supply chains more responsive amid disruption situations. Findings of this paper clearly shows the impact of the phases of the strategic sourcing process on the responsiveness of the supply chains amid the COVID-19 pandemic. This can encourage supply chain leadership to devote more time to strategic sourcing initiatives to generate improvements on the supply chain performance. This paper is unique since it brings an unexplored relation in respect to strategic sourcing amid disruption situations, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, from a practitioner's perspective. It also significantly contributes to developing new directions for the supply chain management domain to deal with large-scale disruptions, such as the coronavirus pandemic.
    • Improving road transport operations using lean thinking

      Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Forero, Juan Sebastian Beltran; Kumar, Vikas; Villarreal, Bernardo; Cedillo-Campos, Miguel Gaston; Rocha-Lona, Luis; University of Derby; University of Warwick; University of the West of England; Universidad de Monterrey; et al. (Elsevier, 2017-09)
      This paper documents a case study where the transport operations of a word leading provider of paper-based packaging solutions operating in Bogota, Colombia, were measured and improved using lean concepts, methods and tools. The methodology consisted of: (1) direct observations of the transport operations; (2) collection and analysis of data; (3) creation of a Transportation Value Stream Map (TVSM); (4) measurement of the Transportation Overall Vehicle Effectiveness (TOVE); and (5) proposal of improvement recommendations. The TVSM identified six wastes: waiting, resource utilisation, excess movement, over-production, over-processing and behavioural. The TOVE measure resulted in an efficiency of 54%. The study proposed improvement recommendations based on the results of the TVSM and TOVE.
    • Improving the reliability of warehouse operations in the 3PL Industry: an Australian 3PL case study.

      Dieu Ho, Thi Hien; Daniel, Jay; Nadeem, Simon Peter; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Kumar, Vikas; International College of Management, Manly NSW; University of Derby; University of the West of England (IEEE, 2019-01-31)
      Warehouses play an important value-adding role to provide a competitive edge, support business growth and efficiency throughout their supply chains. This paper explores warehouse operations (i.e. receiving, put away, picking, packing and shipping) and a series of challenges faced in managing warehouse operations in general and the 3PL industry in particular. Especially, the paper analyses the warehouse and logistics operations of an Australian 3PL company. By utilizing a mixed method approach both qualitative and quantitative data was gathered through in-depth interviews, direct observations and warehouse operations records. The collected data were then analyzed using thematic analysis. The data was screened and coded to further develop major themes to identify the problematic areas. This analysis helped to identify issues in operations related to the receiving process, missing, picking and locating items as well as human errors. While multiple approaches could be utilized to improve the operations, there yet remained a major challenge to manage operations within the planned budgetary limits. This research, therefore, provides some solutions/recommendations to improve the case company’s warehouse operations through staff empowerment, management process improvement, order dispatch and return process improvement, improvement in record keeping, and recruiting more personnel. These recommendations ensure company’s efficiency while balancing its challenges both in operations and budgetary constraints. This study thus provides an evidence to improve the reliability of warehouse operations through systematic process improvement.
    • Improving the sustainability of food supply chains through circular economy practices – a qualitative mapping approach

      Batista, Luciano; Dora, Manoj; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Kumar, Vikas; Aston University, Birmingham; Brunel University, Uxbridge; University of Derby; University of the West of England (Emerald, 2021-04-30)
      The purpose of this paper is to present a methodological approach to support qualitative analysis of waste flows in food supply chains. The methodological framework introduced allows the identification of circular food waste flows that can maximise the sustainability of food supply chains. Following a qualitative approach, circular economy perspectives are combined with core industrial ecology concepts in the specification of a standardised analytical method to map food waste flows and industrial synergies across a supply chain. The mapped waste flows and industrial linkages depict two time-related scenarios: 1. Current scenarios showing the status quo of existing food waste flows, and 2. Future scenarios pointing out circular flows along the supply chain. The future scenarios inform potential alternatives to take waste flows up the food waste hierarchy. The qualitative approach do not allow generalisations of findings out of the scope of the study. The framework is intended for providing focused analysis, case by case. Future research involving mixedmethods where quantitative approaches complement the qualitative perspectives of the framework would expand the analytical perspective. The framework provides a relatively low cost and pragmatic method to identify alternatives to minimise landfill disposals and improve the sustainability of food supply chains. Its phased methodology and standardised outcomes serve as a referential basis to inform not only comparative analysis, but also policy making and strategic decisions aimed at transforming linear food supply chains into circular economy ecosystems.