• Carbon dioxide emissions intensity convergence: Evidence from central American countries

      Apergis, Nicholas; Payne, James; University of Derby; University of Texas, El Paso (Frontiers, 2020-01-08)
      This paper extends the literature on the convergence of carbon dioxide emissions intensity and its determinants (energy intensity and the carbonization index) for six Central American countries over the period 1971 to 2014. Using the Phillips-Sul club convergence approach, the results indicate two distinct convergence clubs with respect to carbon dioxide emissions intensity and energy intensity with the first convergence club consisting of Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras and the second convergence club consisting of Nicaragua and Panama. However, in the case of the carbonization index, only one convergence club emerges that includes Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua with Panama exhibiting non-convergent behavior.
    • Convergence in cryptocurrency prices? The role of market microstructure

      Apergis, Nicholas; Koutmos, Dimitrios; Payne, James; University of Derby; Worcester Polytechnic Institute; University of Texas, El Paso (Elsevier, 2020-07-04)
      Do we observe convergence between cryptocurrencies over time? This study explores this question with eight major cryptocurrencies in circulation and posits a framework to evaluate whether shifts in their market microstructures drive convergence. Three main findings emerge. First, convergence can emerge between cryptocurrencies with distinct technological functions and classifications. Second, market microstructure behavior drives convergence. Third, estimated transition paths show tighter convergence for half of our sampled cryptocurrencies during the time when the Chicago Board of Exchange (CBOE) introduced bitcoin futures contracts.
    • Convergence of per capita carbon dioxide emissions among developing countries: evidence from stochastic and club convergence tests

      Apergis, Nicholas; Payne, James; University of Derby; University of Texas, El Paso (Springer, 2020-06-19)
      This exploratory study extends the literature on the convergence of per capita carbon dioxide emissions in analyzing the stochastic and club convergence within a panel framework for developing countries. The results from Pesaran (2007) and Bai and Carrion-i-Silvestre (2009) panel unit root tests with allowance for cross-sectional dependence confirm stochastic convergence for low-income, lower-middle income, and combined country panels. Further analysis using the nonlinear time-varying factor model of Phillips and Sul (2007; 2009) to test for convergence reveals the emergence of multiple convergence clubs within each of the three country panels examined. We observe geographic proximity among many of the countries within the respective convergence clubs.
    • Modeling the time varying volatility of housing returns: Further evidence from the U.S. Metropolitan condominium markets

      Apergis, Nicholas; Payne, James; University of Derby; University of Texas, El Paso (Wiley, 2019-04-22)
      This study extends the literature on modeling the volatility of housing returns to the case of condominium returns for five major U.S. metropolitan areas (Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, New York, and San Francisco). Through the estimation of ARMA models for the respective condominium returns, we find volatility clustering of the residuals. The results from an ARMA-TGARCH-M model reveal the absence of asymmetry in the conditional variance. Dummy variables associated with the housing market collapse unique to each metropolitan area were statistically insignificant in the conditional variance equation, but negative and statistically significant in the mean equation. Condominium markets in Los Angeles and San Francisco exhibit the greatest persistence to volatility shocks.