• Kick-Drum signal acquisition, isolation and reinforcement optimization in live sound

      Hill, Adam J.; Hawksford, Malcolm O. J.; Rosenthal, Adam P.; Gand, Gary; University of Essex; Gand Concert Sound (Audio Engineering Society, 2011-05)
      A critical requirement for popular music in live-sound applications is the achievement of a robust kick-drum sound presented to the audience and the drummer while simultaneously achieving a workable degree of acoustic isolation for other on-stage musicians. Routinely a transparent wall is placed in parallel to the kick-drum heads to attenuate sound from the drummer’s monitor loudspeakers, although this can cause sound quality impairment from comb filter interference. Practical optimization techniques are explored, embracing microphone selection and placement (including multiple microphones in combination), isolation-wall location, drum-monitor electronic delay and echo cancellation. A system analysis is presented augmented by real-world measurements and relevant simulations using a bespoke Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) algorithm.
    • Live event performer tracking for digital console automation using industry-standard wireless microphone systems

      Hill, Adam J.; Lane, Kit; Rosenthal, Adam P.; Gand, Gary; University of Derby; Gand Concert Sound (Audio Engineering Society, 2013-10)
      The ever-increasing popularity of digital consoles for audio and lighting at live events provides a greatly expanded set of possibilities regarding automation. This research works towards a solution for performer tracking using wireless microphone signals that operates within the existing infrastructure at professional events. Principles of navigation technology such as received signal strength (RSS), time difference of arrival (TDOA), angle of arrival (AOA) and frequency difference of arrival (FDOA) are investigated to determine their suitability and practicality for use in such applications. Analysis of potential systems indicates that performer tracking is feasible over the width and depth of a stage using only two antennas with a suitable configuration, but limitations of current technology restrict the practicality of such a system.