Recent Submissions

  • Emotional faces, visuo-spatial working memory and anxiety

    Maratos, Frances A.; Simione, Luca; Raffone, Antonino; University of Derby; Italian National Research Council; “Sapienza” University of Rome (ECronicon, 2020-03-30)
    Recent research has demonstrated competition for limited cognitive resources, via emotional prioritization, occurs not only during attentional capture, but also extends to visuo-spatial working memory (VSWM). However, to what extent VSWM biases are influenced by individual differences such as anxiety has received limited attention. Here, we investigated this using a novel change detection paradigm with memory arrays containing 3, 4 or 5 emotional faces (angry, happy and neutral) and participants (n=41), preselected to be high or low trait anxious. The task of participants was to detect if a probe face, presented in the location of one of the original memory array faces, was the ‘same’ or ‘different’. On ‘no change’ trials results revealed that high anxious participants demonstrated poorer performance for larger set sizes than low anxious participants per se. Additionally, high anxious participants demonstrated a threat bias, whereas low anxious participants trended toward emotion superiority. On ‘change’ trials, change detection altered as a function of expression change; change detection was typically greatest when either the memory or probe face was angry. Results reveal VSWM capacity is modulated by trait anxiety and stimulus threat value, as well as highlight the importance of actively investigating (or controlling for) individual differences.
  • Pro-environmental business and clean growth trends for the East Midlands 2020

    Paterson, Fred; Baranova, Polina; Gallotta, Bruno; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2020-06-01)
    Based on responses to the East Midlands Chamber (EMC) Quarterly Economic Survey (Feb 2020): The percentage of businesses in the East Midlands deriving turnover from low carbon and pro-environmental goods and services has nearly doubled between 2015 and 2020: increasing from 16% in 2015 to 31% in 2020. 36% of businesses say their environmental strategy is strongly linked with their business growth strategy. However, four in ten firms do not feel well informed about support for clean growth and more than a quarter (26%) are not engaging with the clean growth agenda.
  • Development and application of eDNA-based tools for the conservation of white-clawed crayfish

    Troth, Christopher R.; Burian, Alfred; Mauvisseau, Quentin; Bulling, Mark; Nightingale, Jen; Mauvisseau, Christophe; Sweet, Michael J.; University of Derby; University of Bristol; Fédération de Pêche et de Protection du Milieu Aquatique du Loir-et-Cher, France (Elsevier, 2020-07-30)
    eDNA-based methods represent non-invasive and cost-effective approaches for species monitoring and their application as a conservation tool has rapidly increased within the last decade. Currently, they are primarily used to determine the presence/absence of invasive, endangered or commercially important species, but they also hold potential to contribute to an improved understanding of the ecological interactions that drive species distributions. However, this next step of eDNA-based applications requires a thorough method development. We developed an eDNA assay for the white-clawed crayfish (Austropotamobius pallipes), a flagship species of conservation in the UK and Western Europe. Multiple subsequent in-situ and ex-situ validation tests aimed at improving method performance allowed us to apply eDNA-based surveys to evaluate interactions between white-clawed crayfish, crayfish plague and invasive signal crayfish. The assay performed well in terms of specificity (no detection of non-target DNA) and sensitivity, which was higher compared to traditional methods (in this case torching). The eDNA-based quantification of species biomass was, however, less reliable. Comparison of eDNA sampling methods (precipitation vs. various filtration approaches) revealed that optimal sampling method differed across environments and might depend on inhibitor concentrations. Finally, we applied our methodology together with established assays for crayfish plague and the invasive signal crayfish, demonstrating their significant interactions in a UK river system. Our analysis highlights the importance of thorough methodological development of eDNA-based assays. Only a critical evaluation of methodological strengths and weaknesses will allow us to capitalise on the full potential of eDNA-based methods and use them as decision support tools in environmental monitoring and conservation practice.
  • Fuzzy rule-based industry 4.0 maturity model for manufacturing and supply chain management operations

    Caiado, R.G.G.; Scavarda, L.F.; Gavião, L.O.; Ivson, P; de Mattos Nascimento, D.L.; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro; Escola Superior de Guerra, Brazil; Federal University of Santa Catarina, Brazil; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2020-07-30)
    Industry 4.0 (I4.0) aims to link disruptive technologies to manufacturing systems, combining smart operations and supply chain management (OSCM). Maturity models (MMs) are valuable methodologies to assist manufacturing organizations to track the progress of their I4.0 initiatives and guide digitalization. However, there is a lack of empirical work on the development of I4.0 MMs with clear guidelines for OSCM digitalization. There is no I4.0 MM with an assessment tool that addresses the imprecision brought by human judgment and the uncertainty and ambiguity inherent to OSCM evaluation. Here we develop a fuzzy logic-based I4.0 MM for OSCM, through a transparent and rigorous procedure, built on a multi-method approach comprising a literature review, interviews, focus groups and case study, from model design to model evaluation. To provide a more realistic evaluation, fuzzy logic and Monte Carlo simulation are incorporated into an I4.0 self-assessment readiness-tool, which is connected with the model architecture. The proposed model has been validated through a real application in a multinational manufacturing organization. The results indicate that the approach provides a robust and practical diagnostic tool, based on a set of OSCM indicators to measure digital readiness of manufacturing industries. It supports the transition towards I4.0 in OSCM domain, by holistically analyzing gaps and prescribing actions that can be taken to increase their OSCM4.0 maturity level.
  • The adoption of environmentally sustainable supply chain management: Measuring the relative effectiveness of hard dimensions

    Choudhary, Sangita; Kumar, Anil; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Nadeem, Simon Peter; University of Derby; BML Munjal University, Gurgaon, India; Government Polytechnic Jhajjar, Jhajjar, India (Wiley, 2020-07-28)
    Adopting green practices in supply chains contribute towards protecting the environment. For the successful adoption of Environmentally Sustainable Supply Chain Management (ESSCM), the dimensions related to technology, strategy and policy etc., termed as hard dimensions in the scholarly literature, play a significant role. However, the independent influence of these dimensions on ESSCM has not been previously studied. Therefore, the present study aims to fill this gap and evaluate the effectiveness of these dimensions. To do this, the most significant dimensions are identified through a thorough literature review and experts’ inputs. To determine their priority and cause-effect relationship, a combined approach of Best Worst Method (BWM) and Decision-Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory (DEMATEL) is used. The analysis indicates that ‘Total Quality Management’, and ‘Technologies for Cleaner Production’, are the most important causal dimensions and provides several insights to the decision-makers to formulate robust business strategies to the adoption of ESSCM.
  • A framework to achieve sustainability in manufacturing organisations of developing economies using Industry 4.0 technologies’ enablers

    Yadav, G; Kumar, Anil; Luthra, S; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Kumar, V; Batista, L; Veermata Jijabai Technological Institute, Mumbai, India; London Metropolitan University; Ch. Ranbir Singh State Institute of Engineering and Technology, Jhajjar, Haryana, India; University of Derby; et al. (Elsevier, 2020-07-07)
    Sustainability has emerged as one of the most important issues in the international market. Ignorance of sustainability aspects has led many manufacturing organisations to face huge financial losses. It has been observed that developed nations have successfully achieved sustainability in their manufacturing sectors. However, the rate of sustainability adoption in developing nations is significantly poorer. The current business trend offers new technologies such as the Internet of Things, Big data analytics, Blockchain, Machine learning, etc. These technologies can be termed under the Industry 4.0 paradigm when considered within a manufacturing context. It is significant to notice that such new technologies directly or indirectly contribute to sustainability. So, it is necessary to explore the enablers that facilitate sustainability adoption. This study aims to develop a framework to improve sustainability adoption across manufacturing organisations of developing nations using Industry 4.0 technologies. Initially, the enablers that strongly influence sustainability adoption are identified through a literature review. Further, a large scale survey is conducted to finalise the Industry 4.0 technologies’ enablers to be included in the framework. Based on the empirical analysis, a framework is developed and tested across an Indian manufacturing case organisation. Finally, Robust Best Worst Method (RBWM) is utilised to identify the intensity of influence of each enabler included in the framework. The findings of the study reveal that managerial and economical, and environmental enablers possess a strong contribution toward sustainability adoption. The outcomes of the present study will be beneficial for researchers, practitioners, and policymakers.
  • Investigating the impact of auto loans on unemployment: The US experience

    Apergis, Emmanuel; Apergis, Nicholas; Young, Weiwei; University of Derby; University of Huddersfield (Taylor & Francis, 2020-07-28)
    This paper explores the impact of automobile loan debt on US unemployment. Individuals with heterogeneous economic positions deem automobiles as important durable goods for unemployment exit and expected wage increases. The methodological approach makes use of an Autoregressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) Bound Testing modelling approach to document a negative and significant relationship between auto loans and unemployment. The results survive certain robustness tests, while they seem to confirm certain theoretical arguments posed in the literature, such as that the credit mechanism that dominates the transmission mechanism of monetary policy (credit shocks have a profound significant link with unemployment), while they seem to mitigate the role of alternative theories (where levered households suffer from a ‘debt overhang’ problem that distorts their preferences, making them demand high wages, and the ‘vacancy-posting’ effect) which imply that loans lead to high unemployment. The findings seem to provide significant recommendations to monetary policy makers on strengthening the banking services industry, providing an alternative to monetary policy for labour market intervention.
  • Save the student labour market

    Hooley, Tristram; Institute of Student Employers; University of Derby (The Student Employer, 2020-07)
    The pandemic has created a youth unemployment ticking time bomb and we all have a role to play. ISE is championing government support for employers. What else can be done?
  • Understanding inclusion

    Wharton, Julie; Codina, Geraldene; Middleton, Tristan; Esposito, Rosanne; University of Winchester; University of Derby; University of Gloucestershire; UCL Centre for Inclusive Education (Nasen, 2020-06-02)
    This mini guide is for SENCOs, school leaders (including governors), teachers and support staff. This guide aims to help you to consider your position with regard to inclusion in your setting, identify how you can develop an inclusive ethos and practice and reflect on the approach to inclusion taken in your setting.
  • Pellino-1 regulates the responses of the airway to viral infection

    Marsh, Elizabeth K; Prestwich, Elizabeth C; Marriott, Helen M; Williams, Lynne; Hart, Amber R; Muir, Claire F; Parker, Lisa C; Jonker, Marnix R; Heijink, Irene H; Timens, Wim; et al. (Frontiers, 2020)
    Exposure to respiratory pathogens is a leading cause of exacerbations of airway diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Pellino-1 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase known to regulate virally-induced inflammation. We wished to determine the role of Pellino-1 in the host response to respiratory viruses in health and disease. Pellino-1 expression was examined in bronchial sections from patients with GOLD stage 2 COPD and healthy controls. Primary bronchial epithelial cells (PBECs), in which Pellino-1 expression had been knocked down, were extracellularly challenged with the TLR3 agonist poly(I:C). C57BL/6 Peli1-/- mice and wild type littermates were subjected to intranasal infection with clinically-relevant respiratory viruses; rhinovirus (RV1B) and influenza A. We find that Pellino-1 is expressed in the airways of normal subjects and those with COPD, and that Pellino-1 regulates TLR3 signalling and responses to airways viruses. In particular we observed that knockout of Pellino‐1 in the murine lung resulted in increased production of proinflammatory cytokines IL‐6 and TNFα upon viral infection, accompanied by enhanced recruitment of immune cells to the airways, without any change in viral replication. Pellino-1 therefore regulates inflammatory airway responses without altering replication of respiratory viruses.
  • Professional football clubs’ involvement in health promotion in Spain: an audit of current practices

    Lozano-Sufrategui, Lorena; Pringle, Andy; Zwolinsky, Stephen; Drew, Kevin J; Leeds Beckett University (Oxford University Press (OUP), 2019-09-20)
    The implementation of effective community-based health interventions within Spanish football clubs has the potential to positively influence the public health agenda and enable the health care system in Spain to be more successful and sustainable. This paper aims to explore the involvement of Spanish football clubs in health promotion activities, their potential for future involvement and what that would require. A mixed methods explanatory sequential design, with a purposive sample of La Liga clubs. Data collection included online questionnaires and phone interviews. Quantitative methods enabled us to describe the number and types of programmes the clubs are currently involved in. Qualitative data was useful to further unpick the processes followed by the clubs in planning and developing health promotion programmes, while identifying any determinants to change. Seventeen clubs completed questionnaires and 11 participated in interviews. Clubs generally support inclusive programmes that target disadvantaged groups. Health-related programmes focus on healthy eating, physical activity and blood donation. Thematic analysis of interviews with 11 representatives of La Liga clubs resulted in three key themes. These related to: (1) Diversity of programmes; (2) (Lack of) evidence-based approaches to intervention design and evaluation; and (3) Contrasting views about a club’s role in health promotion interventions. Spanish football clubs have potential to reach into communities that are currently underserved. However, there is limited infrastructure and understanding within the clubs to do this. Nevertheless, there is huge opportunity for organisations with public health responsibility in Spain to implement translational approaches within football-based settings.
  • Design programmes to maximise participant engagement: a predictive study of programme and participant characteristics associated with engagement in paediatric weight management

    Nobles, James; Griffiths, Claire; Pringle, Andy; Gately, Paul; Leeds Beckett University (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2016-07-19)
    Approximately 50 % of paediatric weight management (WM) programme attendees do not complete their respective programmes. High attrition rates compromise both programme effectiveness and cost-efficiency. Past research has examined pre-intervention participant characteristics associated with programme (non-)completion, however study samples are often small and not representative of multiple demographics. Moreover, the association between programme characteristics and participant engagement is not well known. This study examined participant and programme characteristics associated with engagement in a large, government funded, paediatric WM programme. Engagement was defined as the family’s level of participation in the WM programme. Secondary data analysis of 2948 participants (Age: 10.44 ± 2.80 years, BMI: 25.99 ± 5.79 kg/m2, Standardised BMI [BMI SDS]: 2.48 ± 0.87 units, White Ethnicity: 70.52 %) was undertaken. Participants attended a MoreLife programme (nationwide WM provider) between 2009 and 2014. Participants were classified into one of five engagement groups: Initiators, Late Dropouts, Low- or High- Sporadic Attenders, or Completers. Five binary multivariable logistic regression models were performed to identify participant (n = 11) and programmatic (n = 6) characteristics associated with an engagement group. Programme completion was classified as ≥70 % attendance. Programme characteristics were stronger predictors of programme engagement than participant characteristics; particularly small group size, winter/autumn delivery periods and earlier programme years (proxy for scalability). Conversely, participant characteristics were weak predictors of programme engagement. Predictors varied between engagement groups (e.g. Completers, Initiators, Sporadic Attenders). 47.1 % of participants completed the MoreLife programme (mean attendance: 59.4 ± 26.7 %, mean BMI SDS change: -0.15 ± 0.22 units), and 21 % of those who signed onto the programme did not attend a session. As WM services scale up, the efficacy and fidelity of programmes may be reduced due to increased demand and lower financial resource. Further, limiting WM programme groups to no more than 20 participants could result in greater engagement. Baseline participant characteristics are poor and inconsistent predictors of programme engagement. Thus, future research should evaluate participant motives, expectations, and barriers to attending a WM programme to enhance our understanding of participant WM engagement. Finally, we suggest that session-by-session attendance is recorded as a minimum requirement to improve reporting transparency and enhance external validity of study findings.
  • “Football is pure enjoyment”: An exploration of the behaviour change processes which facilitate engagement in football for people with mental health problems

    Hargreaves, Jackie; Pringle, Andy; Leeds Beckett University (Elsevier BV, 2019-03-08)
    Physical activity is known to be beneficial for people with mental health problems, although engagement is low. Football, provided by professional football club community trusts could aid engagement in physical activity, however little is known about the behaviour change processes which engage individuals in this type of PA. One factor which is often overlooked is affect and exploring this could help identify the behaviour change processes, which engage individuals in a professional football club-led mental health intervention. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of individuals attending football provided by a professional club community trust to further our understanding of the behaviour change processes involved in facilitating engagement in this provision. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with twelve men who played football provided by a professional football club trust. A range of mental health problems were reported and the participants were aged between 19 and 46. Template analysis was conducted, implementing some of the concepts from the Affective – Reflective Theory (ART). The results highlighted that both affective and reflective processes of ART were evident in engaging individuals in football. Pleasurable experiences were enabled through the physical and social characteristics of football. Self-control strategies emerged which help to action engagement. The professional football club trust provided coaching knowledge and skills, team organisation and resources and feelings of belonging and responsibility. Application of ART to the understanding of football experiences has provided a novel exploration of the processes involved in engaging individuals in football. This has important implications for intervention design; the focus should be on providing pleasurable experiences and fostering appropriate self-control strategies.
  • Linking physical activity & health evaluation to policy: lessons from UK evaluations

    Pringle, Andy; McKenna, J; Zwolinsky, S; Leeds Beckett University (Routledge, 2017-12-18)
    Evaluation is an important component of contemporary physical activity (PA) interventions. In this chapter, we provide a series of peer-review case studies that we have been involved. We comment on a number of issues and debates on the role of evaluation in PA policy and interventions. The case studies selected originated in local and or national policy. To identify these cases, we applied two key criteria set elsewhere (Pringle, Hargreaves Lozano et al., 2014): (I) Credibility: Cases represent real world illustrations of the place of evaluation in a policy context. (II). Impact: Cases identify their effects. The case studies provide applied, insightful, contextual and practical examples of partnership evaluations in both PA intervention and policy. Emerging from these case studies are a number of lessons for how evaluation is performed. We share this learning so it may shape future evaluation practice in physical activity and public health.
  • ‘It brings the lads together’: a critical exploration of older men’s experiences of a weight management programme delivered through a Healthy Stadia project

    Lozano-Sufrategui, Lorena; Pringle, Andy; Carless, David; McKenna, Jim; Leeds Beckett University (Taylor and Francis, 2016-04-22)
    Older men whose weight is considered unhealthy may experience particular barriers that can restrict their adoption of health improvement interventions. Despite promising findings recommending the use of sports settings to facilitate health promotion with men, little evidence has addressed older men’s health needs for, or experiences of, these settings. Using a qualitative methodology, this study explored the experiences of 14 ageing men attending a football-led weight management programme delivered at a community sports setting. The thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews elucidates important insights regarding the provision of sports-led health improvement interventions for this population. Men especially valued the opportunity to play sports and do physical activity in an environment that promotes ‘inclusive’ competition and caring interpersonal relationships. Implicit in the findings is the key role of practitioners in promoting social engagement. We conclude the paper with key practical implications of this research.
  • Shaping the new normal: practising career guidance in the time of coronavirus

    Hooley, Tristram; Thomsen, Rie; Sultana, Ronald; University of Derby (Career Development Institute, 2020-04)
    What is the potential of career guidance in a time where the coronavirus is disrupting work and life as we know it? How can we as career practitioners respond in a situation where we do not know what the world will look like and where we, as well as the citizens we meet, will have more questions than answers? In this article we argue, that supporting people to manage their way through the crisis is not enough. Career guidance should also help people to think about and shape the ‘new normal’.
  • Election over, Brexit next. But, what is the future for career guidance?

    Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Career Development Institute, 2020-01)
  • “Suddenly you are King Solomon”: Multiplicity, transformation and integration in compassion focused therapy chairwork

    Bell, Tobyn; Montague, Jane; Elander, James; Gilbert, Paul; University of Derby (American Psychological Association (APA), 2020-07-16)
    Chairwork is a psychotherapeutic method that frequently focuses on self-multiplicity and internal relationships. Compassion-focused therapy (CFT) uses chairwork to generate and apply compassion towards threat-based aspects of the self. This study explores self-multiplicity in a CFT chairwork intervention for self-criticism. Twelve participants with depression were interviewed following the intervention and the resultant data were analyzed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Three super-ordinate themes were identified: differentiating selves; mental imagery of selves; and integrating and transforming selves with compassion. The results highlight how the intervention enabled clients to differentiate internal aspects of themselves in a way that was accessible and helpful, increasing self-complexity and introducing the potential to observe and change patterns of self-to-self relating. The process of bringing compassion to self-criticism was shown to integrate both aspects of the critical dialogue, transforming the ‘critic’ by understanding its fears and function. The use of mental imagery was also shown to facilitate clients’ experience of self-multiplicity and to symbolize the kind of changes generated by the exercise. Implications for clinical practice are discussed.
  • An integrated framework for evaluating the barriers to successful implementation of reverse logistics in the automotive industry

    Kaviani, Mohamad Amin; Madjid, Tavana; Kumar, Anil; Jerzy, Michnik; Raziyeh, Niknam; Elaine Aparecida, Regiani de Campos; University of Cyprus; La Salle University, Philadelphia, USA; University of Derby; University of Economics, Katowice, Poland; et al. (Elsevier, 2020-07-07)
    Reverse logistics (RL) strategy can have a positive impact on productivity, and the diminishing resources, along with the strict environmental regulations, have strengthened the need for this strategy. The purpose of this study is to develop an integrated framework for identifying: (1) the critical barriers to the successful implementation of RL in the automotive industry; (2) the importance and implementation priorities of these barriers; and (3) the causal relations among them. The proposed framework is composed of the Delphi method to identify the most relevant barriers, the best-worst method (BWM) to determine their importance, and the weighted influence non-linear gauge system (WINGS) to analyze their causal relationships. The proposed framework is applied to a case study in the automotive industry. The results indicate the economic barriers are the most important, and the knowledge barriers are the least important barriers to the successful implementation of RL in the automotive industry.
  • Constituent relations across the city: Three perspectives from practice

    McCloskey, Paula; Vardy, Sam; University of Derby; Sheffield Hallam University (2019-05-24)
    What kinds of practices help us to explore, rethink and remake our co-relations? Constituent relations across the city: Three perspectives from practice. In this session, we propose speaking across and from three different spatial practices of which we are part,and which are situated in different socio-spatial conditions: a place of their own (an art/spatial research practice); Studio Polpo (the UK’s first social enterprise architectural practice); and Architecture Sans Frontières - UK (a non-profit aiming to make community development integral to architectural practice and teaching). By sharing moments of co-incidence from these practices that seek to co-otherwise we seek to show thinking and acting with co-ness is generative of creative, relational processes and resistant practices. Studio Polpo designs situated and collaborative approaches to create objects, structures, initiatives and research-led resources that enable transformative social change. To this end we self-initiate projects to support diverse economies of participation and exchange through spatial intervention. We have facilitated the collective ownership and/or management of a number of buildings and programmes, hosted events which protest the commercial use of city centres and propose more diverse ways of living and exchanging that activate more distributed networks of design. ASF-UK is a non-profit organisation with three main objectives: to increase knowledge and understanding of community participation amongst built environment students and practitioners (training and capacity building); to support community groups, civil society organisations and local governments by working in partnership and facilitating the involvement of built environment professionals (live projects); and to influence urban policy and planning processes by mainstreaming methodologies and practices focused on democratic and resilient city-making (advocacy). a place of their own operate as a collective, a couple, with our children, and through collaborations with others. In the Eile Project, we operate in the specific context of the geo-political border between the Irish Republic and the UK and enact an alternative ethics of spatial action through intra-actions and ‘kinning’. Eile's interventions, rituals and the audiovisual films we produce with them draw forth kinship, different alliances between organic and in-organic matter, non-human animals (the white cryptic butterfly, the lobster), and re-territorialize traumatic sites. Why this (co-) is an important question for us to carry out these kinds of practices? Or What kinds of practices help us to explore, rethink and remake our co-relations?

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