Recent Submissions

  • An English version of the mathematics teaching anxiety scale

    Hunt, Thomas E.; SARI, Mehmet Hayri; University of Derby; Veli University (IJATE, 2019-10-15)
    This study represents the implementation of an English version of the Mathematics Teaching Anxiety Scale (MTAS), originally published in Turkey (Sari, 2014). One hundred and twenty-seven primary school teachers from across the U.K. completed the survey, including 74 qualified teachers and 53 trainees. Following item-reduction and factor analysis, the 19-item MTAS was found to have excellent internal consistency (α = .94) and has a two-factor structure. Factor one, labelled Self-Directed Mathematics Teaching Anxiety, includes 12 items pertaining to a teacher's own teaching practice and perceived ability, whereas factor two, labelled Pupil/Student-Directed Mathematics Teaching Anxiety, includes 7 items pertaining to anxiety concerning pupils/students failing assessments or not reaching curriculum/school targets. Pre-service teachers, compared to in-service teachers, self-reported significantly higher overall maths teaching anxiety. Among in-service teachers, there was a significant negative correlation between length of service and maths teaching anxiety. These findings are important in the context of retention issues in newly qualified teachers and the need to support trainees and newer teachers if they experience anxiety related to teaching maths.
  • Group singing has multiple benefits in the context of chronic pain: an exploratory pilot study

    Irons, J. Yoon; Kuipers, Pim; Wan, Aston; Stewart, Donald E; Health and Social Care Research Centre, University of Derby (Elsevier, 2019-09-05)
    This paper reports findings of a pilot singing intervention to assist people living with chronic pain. Pain Management Clinic out-patients participated in 10 weekly group singing sessions. Benefits of the intervention and its impact on participants’ (N=4) experience of pain were explored qualitatively. Three main themes comprising over 20 separate codes indicated physical, psychological and social dimensions associated with the intervention. People with chronic pain identify multiple benefits from participating in a group singing program. Group singing in chronic pain settings has multiple benefits; and can be a beneficial adjunct to conventional pain management care and nursing, which may positively complement clinical outcomes.
  • Social and environmental sustainability model on consumers’ altruism, green purchase intention, green brand loyalty, and evangelism

    Panda, T. K.; Kumar, A; Jakhar, S; Luthra, S; Garza-Reyes, J. A.; Kazancoglu, I; Nayak, S.S.; University of Derby; OP Jindal Global University, India; Indian Institute of Management Lucknow, India; et al. (Elsevier, 2019-09-26)
    Across the globe, the awareness for environmental degradation and its harmful effects is rapidly growing. The whole world has come together to work in the direction to protect the environment. Consumers are increasingly becoming cautious towards the impact of their consumption pattern on environment and organisations can attain a competitive edge by leveraging this cautiousness by offering them green products/brands. However, it is importance for the marketers to understand that how increasing levels of sustainability awareness impacts other factors which explain pro-environmental behaviour of customers. To fill the existing gap in the current literature in this regard, the current study aims to build a structural model which includes social and environmental sustainability awareness in measuring customer altruism, buying intention, loyalty and customer evangelism. The theoretical model extends the existing framework of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) and explores the decision-making framework regarding ethical behaviour. Through existing literature review and expert input, the indicators (variables) for each construct were recognised. After that, data was collected from 331 respondents through a structurally designed questionnaire; the hypothetical model was test using the Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) technique. The findings of the study indicate that sustainability awareness positively influence the consumer altruism which in turn enhances the consumer purchase intention, green brand loyalty and green brand evangelism and altruism can and can bridge value-action gap for green brands. Current analysis supports the view that there are significant positive associations among the identified constructs.
  • Sensitivity of economic policy uncertainty to investor sentiment

    Rehman, Mobeen Ur; Apergis, Nicholas; University of Piraeus; University of Derby; Institute of Science and Technology Islamabad, Pakistan (Emerald, 2019-06-24)
    A series of global financial crises in 21st century, steep economic decline and slow recoveries have intensified the concern of regulatory bodies for economic policy certainty. This study explores the effect of investor sentiment on economic policy uncertainty (EPU), spanning the period 1995-2015. The analysis is carried out for Asian, Developed and the European market samples by applying the method of quantile regressions. The findings document the presence of a negative impact of investor sentiment on EPU. Robustness analysis illustrates the validity of the results for the cases of Asian and Developed markets.
  • Slow on the draw: the representation of turtles, terrapins and tortoises in children’s literature

    Beaumont, Ellen S.; Briers, Erin; Harrison, Emma; University of Derby; The Orkney Campus of Heriot-Watt University, Stromness (Springer, 2019-08-08)
    Children’s picture books, both fiction and non-fiction, play a vital role in introducing the reader to the natural world. Here we examine the representation of turtles, terrapins and tortoises (Testudines) in 204 English language picture books and find a mean of 3.9 (SD 9.1) basic biological errors per book. Only 83 (40.7%) of the examined books were found to be error-free in the representation of Testudines, with no significant improvement in biological accuracy being observed over time (book publication date range 1974–2017). Suggestions are made as to how biological accuracy of children’s literature could be improved to help foster children’s understanding and wonder of the natural world. Fantasy and imagination have an important role within children’s literature, but here it is argued that the books children read should support future generations having sufficient understanding of the natural world to imagine the solutions to current environmental problems. A role of children’s picture books should not be to reinforce biological illiteracy.
  • SENCO induction pack: Supporting you at the start of your journey

    Whatton, Julie; Codina, Geraldene; Middleton, Tristan; Esposito, Rosanne; Department for Education; NASEN (Whole School SEND/DfE/LLSENDCiC/nasen, 2019-04)
    This induction pack has been designed by SENCOs for SENCOs as a useful reference tool that can be used from day one of undertaking this important role. It can be a valuable asset to both new and experienced professionals alike and we would recommend it to all SENCOs. We understand that the role is context-specific and so, instead of trying to prescribe a single approach, this induction pack sets out the key operational considerations so that SENCOs can make more informed decisions. This SENCO Induction Pack has been developed by Leading Learning for SEND Community Interest Company as part of a suite of resources developed by the Whole School SEND Consortium3, hosted by nasen4, to embed good SEND provision in schools. This project was funded by the Department for Education. As such, the induction pack includes references to a broad range of organisations, resources and documents from across the SEND community. This is in keeping with one of the wider principles of Whole School SEND, which is to maximise the use of existing resources to save schools time and money.
  • Gaining more than just vocational skills: Evaluating women learners’ aspirations through the capability approach

    Suart, Rebecca; University of Nottingham (Springer, 2018-12-12)
    Vocational education and training had been a popular choice for women learners in the English Further Education sector. However, policy makers and policy researchers have characterized these women learners as providing a poor return on investment due to their failure to enter immediate employment. As a result, there have been significant cuts to funding. Such policy processes have not engaged with why these women returned to education and what they stood to gain from participation. This major absence is the focus of this chapter. Framed using a capabilities approach, women learners were asked why they had returned to FE and how they were going to use their knowledge and training. Using capabilities as a lens reveals a nuanced and complex picture of how education helps them to expand their well-being, agency, and freedom achievement.
  • Assessment: Evidence-based teaching for enquiring teachers

    Atherton, Chris; Poultney, Val; Sir John Deane's Sixth Form College; University of Derby (Critical Publishing, 2018)
  • Lower crustal heterogeneity and fractional crystallisation control evolution of small volume magma batches at ocean island volcanoes (Ascension Island, South Atlantic)

    Chamberlain, Katy J.; Barclay, Jenni; Preece, Katie; Brown, Richard J.; Davidson, Jon P.; Durham University; University of Derby; University of East Anglia; Swansea University (Oxford University Press, 2019-08-10)
    Ocean island volcanoes erupt a wide range of magmatic compositions via a diverse range of eruptive styles. Understanding where and how these melts evolve is thus an essential component in the anticipation of future volcanic activity. Here we examine the role of crustal structure and magmatic flux in controlling the location, evolution and ultimately composition of melts at Ascension Island. Ascension Island, in the south Atlantic, is an ocean island volcano which has produced a continuum of eruptive compositions from basalt to rhyolite in its 1-million-year subaerial eruptive history. Volcanic rocks broadly follow a silica undersaturated subalkaline evolutionary trend and new data presented here show a continuous compositional trend from basalt through trachyte to rhyolite. Detailed petrographic observations are combined with in-situ geochemical analyses of crystals and glass, and new whole rock major and trace element data from mafic and felsic pyroclastic and effusive deposits that span the entire range in eruptive ages and compositions found on Ascension Island. These data show that extensive fractional crystallisation is the main driver for the production of felsic melt for Ascension Island; a volcano built on thin, young, oceanic crust. Strong spatial variations in the compositions of erupted magmas reveals the role of a heterogeneous lower crust: differing degrees of interaction with a zone of plutonic rocks are responsible for the range in mafic lava composition, and for the formation of the central and eastern felsic complexes. A central core of nested small-scale plutonic, or mush-like, bodies inhibits the ascent of mafic magmas, allowing sequential fractional crystallisation within the lower crust, and generating felsic magmas in the core of the island. There is no evidence for magma mixing preserved in any of the studied eruptions, suggesting that magma storage regions are transient, and material is not recycled between eruptions.
  • Supply chain 4.0: Concepts, maturity and research agenda

    Frederico, G.F., Garza-Reyes, J.A., Anosike, A.I., Kumar, V.; University of Derby; Federal University of Paraná (UFPR), Curitiba, Brazil; University of the West of England (Emerald, 2019-09-14)
    Industry 4.0 is one of the most emergent research topics attracting significant interest by researchers as well as practitioners. Many articles have been published with regards Industry 4.0 however there is no research that clearly conceptualizes Industry 4.0 in the context of supply chain. In this paper, the term “Supply Chain 4.0” is proposed together with a novel conceptual framework that captures the essence of Industry 4.0 within the supply chain context. As Industry 4.0 is inherently a revolution, and as revolutions are evolutionary, this research also aims to capture the evolution of Supply Chain 4.0 from maturity levels perspective to facilitate the formulation and development of Supply Chain 4.0 strategy. Design, Methodology/ Approach – Following a deductive research approach and a qualitative strategy, a Systematic Literature Review (SLR) was adopted as the research method seeking to understand the relationships amongst supply chain, industry 4.0 and maturity levels research. The three phases of the SLR process utilized are: planning, conducting and reporting. A concept-oriented technique was applied to the outputs of the SLR to obtain the key constructs that would facilitate the development of the conceptual Supply Chain 4.0 framework. Findings – The SLR showed that there is limited research linking Industry 4.0 to supply chain. Nevertheless, it was possible to extract a set of thematic categories from the analysis of the articles which are referred to as constructs as they form the core of the conceptual Supply Chain 4.0 framework. These constructs are Managerial & Capabilities Supporters, Technology Levers, Processes Performance Requirements and Strategic Outcomes. Each of these constructs consist of a number of elements which are referred to as ‘dimensions’ in this research and a total of twenty one (21) dimensions were identified during the SLR. The SLR also demonstrated that maturity propositions for Industry 4.0 are still embrionary and entirely missing in the context of Supply Chain. Hence, this research develops and proposes a maturity levels framework that is underpinned by the core constructs of Supply Chain 4.0 and the corresponding dimensions. As these proposed frameworks are conceptual, this research also identifies and proposes several research directions to help fortify the Supply Chain 4.0 concept. Originality/value – The SLR demonstrated a clear gap in literature with regards to Industry 4.0 in the context of Supply Chain, and also in the context of Industry 4.0 maturity levels for Supply Chain. This research is unique as it formulates and introduces novel frameworks that close these gaps in literature. The value of this research lies in the fact that it makes significant contribution in terms of understanding of Supply Chain 4.0 with a clear set of constructs and dimensions that form Supply Chain 4.0, which provides the foundation for further work in this area. Research Implications/ limitations – This research argues that the frameworks are robust since the constructs and dimensions are grounded in literature thus demonstrating both theoretical and practical relevance and value. As Supply Chain 4.0 research is still in infancy, there are a range of open research questions suggested based on the frameworks that could serve as guides for researchers to further develop the Supply Chain 4.0 concept. Also, practitioners can use this framework in order to develop better understanding of Supply Chain 4.0 and be able to evaluate the maturity of their organizations. As the proposed frameworks are conceptual, they require further empirical research in other to validate them and obtain new insights.
  • A lean six sigma framework for continuous and incremental improvement in the oil and gas sector

    Nascimento, D. L. M; Goncalvez Quelhas, O. L.; Gusmão Caiado, R. G.; Tortorella, Guilherme; Garza-Reyes, J. A.; Rocha-Lona, L., Muñoz-Sanchez, C., Garza-Reyes, J.A., Kumar, V., Lopez-Torres, G.C.; University of Derby; Federal Fluminense University, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; University of Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, Brazil; Instituto Politecnico Nacional, ESCA Santo Tomas, Mexico City, Mexico (Emerald, 2019-09-19)
    This article aims to explore synergies between Lean Production (LP) and Six Sigma principles in order to propose a Lean Six Sigma (LSS) framework for continuous and incremental improvement in the oil and gas sector. The Three-Dimensional LSS Framework seeks to provide various combinations about the integration between LP principles, DMAIC cycle and PDCA cycle to support operations management needs. Design/methodology/approach - The research method is composed of two main steps: (i) diagnostic of current problems and proposition of a conceptual framework that qualitatively integrates synergistic aspects of LP and Six Sigma; and (ii) analysis of the application of the construct through semi-structured interviews with leaders from oil and gas companies to assess and validate the proposed framework. Findings - As a result, a conceptual framework of LSS is developed contemplating the integration of LP and Six Sigma and providing a systemic and holistic approach to problemsolving through continuous and incremental improvement in the oil and gas sector. Originality/value - This research is different from previous studies because it integrates LP principles, DMAIC and PDCA cycles into a unique framework that fulfils a specific need of oil and gas sector. It presents a customized LSS framework that guides wastes and costs reduction, while enhances quality and reduces process variability to elevate efficiency in operations management of this sector. The paper type is an original research that present new and original scientific findings.
  • Industry 4.0 as enabler of sustainability diffusion in supply chain: analysis of influential strength of drivers in emerging economy

    Luthra, S; Kumar, A; Zavadskas, E; Mangla, S; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; University of Derby; Plymouth University; Vilnius Gediminas Technical University; Government Engineering College India (Taylor & Francis, 2019-09-26)
    Industry 4.0 (I4.0) and sustainability are recent buzzwords in manufacturing environments. However, the connection between these two concepts is less explored in the literature. In the current business context, the future generation of manufacturing systems is greatly influenced by the rapid advancement of information technology. Therefore, this study aims to examine the drivers of I4.0 to diffuse sustainability in Supply Chains (SCs). This research identifies the most relevant drivers through the literature and discusses them with area experts. Afterwards, an empirical analysis is conducted to validate the key drivers. Finally, the Grey based DEMATEL method is employed to examine the influential strength of the identified drivers and to build an interrelationship diagram. ‘Government supportive policies’ and ‘Collaboration and transparency among supply chain members’ were reported as highly significant drivers of I4.0. This study is an initial effort that investigates the key drivers of I4.0 to achieve high triple bottom line (ecological-economic-social) gains in SCs by taking an example from an emerging economy, i.e. India. This study may help managers, practitioners and policy makers interested in I4.0 applications to diffuse sustainability in SCs.
  • Youth, migration and identity in Cuba since 1959

    Luke, Anne; University of Derby (Routledge, 2017-08-15)
    In Cuba, the issue of migration cannot be disaggregated from the relationship with the US and, specifically, the issues of migration from socialist Cuba to its larger neighbour. Such migration is an important element of the political relationship between the two countries, but is also a key factor in the definition of Cuban identity. This chapter will present two case studies of the intersection of migration and youth in Cuba after 1959 and will explore the relationship between these cases and the contemporary polemic on migration. The relationship between island-based Cubans and the Cuban diaspora and very notion of national identity and the right to self-define as Cuban are woven into narratives of international relations as the intimate level of family relations come into contact (and conflict) with high politics. Young Cubans experience migration not only as migrants but also from the island where such migration has become part of the Cuban imagined identity. The repeated moral panics over young people who do not work or study over the Revolutionary period coupled with the heightened focus on young people as key agents in the revolutionary process creates a specific set of circumstances which allow for a definition of Cuban identity which is fluid and in flux, but which, given the new (though fragile) reality of a closer relationship with the USA, has sought and continues to seek to incorporate migration into a reflective understanding of the revolutionary process.
  • Handbook of vocational education and training

    Stuart, Rebecca; McGrath, Simon; Mulder, Martin; Papier, Joy; University of the Western Cape; Wageningen University; University of Nottingham (Springer International Publishing, 2019)
    This handbook brings together and promotes research on the area of vocational education and training (VET). It analyzes current and future economic and labor market trends and relates these to likely implications for vocational education and training. It questions how VET engages with the growing power of human development approaches and with the sustainable development agenda. Equity and inclusion are discussed in a range of ways by the authors and the consideration of the construction of these terms is an important element of the handbook. It further addresses both the overall notion of system reform, at different scales, and what is known about particular technologies of systems reform across a variety of settings. Vocational learning and VET teacher/trainer education are discussed from a comparative perspective. National and comparative experiences are also shared on questions of equity and efficiency in funding in terms of those that fund and are funded, and for a range of funding methodologies. As well as reviewing existing gaps, this handbook is looking forward in identifying promising new directions in research and environment.
  • Gaining more than just vocational skills: Evaluating women learners’ aspirations through the capability approach

    Stuart, Rebecca; University of the Western Cape (Springer International Publishing, 2018-12-12)
    Vocational education and training had been a popular choice for women learners in the English Further Education sector. However, policy makers and policy researchers have characterized these women learners as providing a poor return on investment due to their failure to enter immediate employment. As a result, there have been significant cuts to funding. Such policy processes have not engaged with why these women returned to education and what they stood to gain from participation. This major absence is the focus of this chapter. Framed using a capabilities approach, women learners were asked why they had returned to FE and how they were going to use their knowledge and training. Using capabilities as a lens reveals a nuanced and complex picture of how education helps them to expand their well-being, agency, and freedom achievement.
  • Growth rate, extinction and survival amongst late Cenozoic bivalves of the North Atlantic

    Johnson, Andrew L. A.; Harper, Elizabeth M.; Clarke, Abigail; Featherstone, Aaron C.; Heywood, Daniel J.; Richardson, Kathryn E.; Spink, Jack O.; Thornton, Luke A.H.; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2019-09-12)
    Late Cenozoic bivalve extinction in the North Atlantic and adjacent areas has been attributed to environmental change (declines in temperature and primary production). Within scallops and oysters—bivalve groups with a high growth rate—certain taxa which grew exceptionally fast became extinct, while others which grew slower survived. The taxa which grew exceptionally fast would have obtained protection from predators thereby, so their extinction may have been due to the detrimental effect of environmental change on growth rate and ability to avoid predation, rather than environmental change per se. We investigated some glycymeridid and carditid bivalves—groups with a much lower growth rate than scallops and oysters—to see whether extinct forms from the late Cenozoic of the North Atlantic grew faster than extant forms, and hence whether their extinction may also have been mediated by increased mortality due to predation. Growth rate was determined from the cumulative width of annual increments in the hinge area; measurements were scaled up to overall shell size for the purposes of comparison with data from living species. Growth of the extinct glycymeridid Glycymeris subovata was at about the same rate as the slowest-growing living glycymeridid and much slower than in late Cenozoic samples of extant G. americana, in which growth was at about the same rate as the fastest-growing living glycymeridid. Growth of extinct G. obovata was also slower than G. americana, and that of the extinct carditid Cardites squamulosa ampla similarly slow (evidently slower than in the one living carditid species for which data are available). These findings indicate that within bivalve groups whose growth is much slower than scallops and oysters, extinction or survival of taxa through the late Cenozoic was not influenced by whether they were relatively fast or slow growers. By implication, environmental change acted directly to cause extinctions in slow-growing groups, rather than by increasing susceptibility to predation.
  • Integrated green lean approach and sustainability for SMEs: From literature review to a conceptual framework

    Siegel, Rebecca; Antony, Jiju; Garza-Reyes, Jose; Cherrafi, Anass; Lameijer, Bart; University of Derby; Heriot Watt University; Cadi Ayyad University; University of Amsterdam (Elsevier, 2019-08-28)
    Over the last decades, there has been growing pressure on organizations to manage their operations in a responsible manner to improve their environmental and social performance. This has motivated organizations and researchers alike to identify ways to implement sustainable operations. In this context, Green-Lean has emerged as a major part of the sustainability answer. The discussion on Green-Lean in the context of manufacturing SMEs is in a less developed stage and deserves attention. Thus, the main objective of this research was to identify and analyze, through a systematic review, data on the challenges, success factors, tools and techniques, sustainability aspects, frameworks and benefits of Green-Lean in manufacturing SMEs. A systemic model representing the relationship among the determinants to implement a Green-Lean initiative for manufacturing SMES is also presented and discussed. The findings indicate that the most common challenge to Green-Lean implementation is a lack of metrics and measurement. 5S is the most used tool. In addition, the majority of frameworks have been developed for specific industrial sectors instead of generic frameworks to reduce/eliminate different wastes. However, these frameworks have missed the social dimension. The main contribution of this paper is the provision of an exhaustive summary of the state of knowledge and systematic classification of the relevant literature on the Green-Lean initiative in the context of SMEs. The findings are useful for both academics and SME owners and managers to undertake measures for improving sustainability.
  • Bridging the gap: 40Ar/39Ar dating of volcanic eruptions from the ‘Age of Discovery’

    Preece, Katie; Mark, Darren F.; Barclay, Jenni; Cohen, Benjamin E.; Chamberlain, Katy J.; Jowitt, Claire; Vye-Brown, Charlotte; Brown, Richard J.; Hamilton, Scott; Isotope Geoscience Unit, Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre, East Kilbride; et al. (Geological Society of America, 2018-11-09)
    Many volcanoes worldwide still have poorly resolved eruption histories, with the date of the last eruption often undetermined. One such example is Ascension Island, where the timing of the last eruption, and consequently, the activity status of the volcano, is unclear. Here, we use the 40Ar/39Ar dating technique to resolve ages of the three youngest lava flows on the island, which are hawaiites and mugearite with 1.5 – 1.9 wt% K2O. In dating these lavas, we provide the first evidence of Holocene volcanic activity on Ascension (0.51 ± 0.18 ka; 0.55 ± 0.12 ka; 1.64 ± 0.37 ka), determining that it should be classed as an active volcanic system. In addition, we demonstrate that the 40Ar/39Ar method can reproducibly date mafic lava flows younger than 1 ka, decreasing the gap between recorded history and geological dating. These results offer new prospects for determining patterns of late-Holocene volcanic activity; critical for accurate volcanic hazard assessment.
  • The eye of the beholder

    Bird, Jamie; University of Derby (Routledge, 2019-07-30)
    This chapter addresses issues that arose from being a male researcher and art therapist conducting arts-based research with women who had experienced domestic violence and abuse. Engaging in such research required that I critically engage with issues of gender within the context of conducting research. Through the lens of one particular vignette taken from a larger study, this paper will engage with broader ideas about gender and the conducting of arts-based research and art therapy. Whilst this chapter will have relevance for those men engaged in research or art therapy that involves aspects of domestic violence and abuse, it will also have relevance to those who are interested in wider discussions to be had about the influence of gender upon relationships within therapy and research. This has always been a topic worthy of sustained investigation, but the contemporary emergence within public discourse about abuses of male privilege within various professions make this an especially important subject to attend to. Drawing upon the work of Sandra Harding (1998, 2004), Jeff Hearn (1998) and Ann Murphy (2012), I will explore how feminist standpoint theory and reflexivity helped to manage, and make sense of, the concerns and anxieties that arose whilst conducting research into violence against women. Anxieties about research becoming therapy merged with anxieties about being a male researcher working with women who had experienced domestic violence and abuse. Whilst this chapter does not aim to outline in depth what an arts-based research methodology looks like within the context of studying domestic violence and abuse, it begins by describing the methodology in enough detail to provide a context within which the nature of the research process can be appreciated. The findings of the research are presented in sufficient detail to allow the overall findings of the research to be understood. There then follows examples of words and images produced by one woman, who used her participation as a way of ensuring that she was seen clearly by myself and by other research participants. This aspect of wanting to be seen became an embodiment of the need to acknowledge my own standpoint and reflexive position as a male researcher. Evaluative comments about participation made by other women are used to show how vulnerability was a feature of taking part in this research for both participants and for me. The concept of vulnerability is examined with reference made to ideas about imagination and empathy from the perspective of feminist philosophy, which in turn helps to shape a discussion about the place of gender within research, art therapy, and the boundary between them. In keeping with the principles of feminist standpoint theory and strong objectivity, as set forth by Harding (1998), this chapter is written from a first-person perspective.
  • Parental and health professional evaluations of a support service for parents of excessively crying infants

    Bamber, Deborah; Powell, Charlotte; Long, Jaqui; Garratt, Rosie; Brown, Jayne; Rudge, Sally; Morris, Tom; Bhupendra Jaicim, Nishal; Plachcinski, Rachel; Dyson, Sue E.; et al. (Springer Nature/ BMC, 2019-08-22)
    The ‘Surviving Crying’ study was designed to develop and provisionally evaluate a support service for parents of excessively crying babies, including its suitability for use in the United Kingdom (UK) National Health Service (NHS). The resulting service includes three materials: a website, a printed booklet, and a Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) programme delivered to parents by a qualified professional. This study aimed to measure whether parents used the materials and to obtain parents’ and NHS professionals’ evaluations of whether they are fit for purpose. Parents were asked about participating in a randomised controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate the materials fully in health service use. Methods: Participants were 57 parents with babies they judged to be crying excessively and 96 NHS Health Visitors (HVs). Parental use and parents’ and HVs’ ratings of the Surviving Crying materials were measured. Results: Thirty four parents reported using the website, 24 the printed booklet and 24 the CBT sessions. Parents mostly accessed the website on mobile phones or tablets and use was substantial. All the parents and almost all HVs who provided data judged the materials to be helpful for parents and suitable for NHS use. If offered a waiting list control group, 85% of parents said they would have been willing to take part in a full RCT evaluation of the Surviving Crying package. Discussion and conclusions: The findings identify the need for materials to support parents of excessively crying babies within national health services in the UK. The Surviving Crying support package appears suitable for this purpose and a full community-level RCT of the package is feasible and likely to be worthwhile. Limitations to the study and barriers to delivery of the services were identified, indicating improvements needed in future research.

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