Recent Submissions

  • Pro-environmental business and clean growth trends for the East Midlands 2021

    Gallotta, Bruno; Paterson, Fred; Baranova, Polina; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2021-06-01)
    Based on responses to the East Midlands Chamber (EMC) Quarterly Economic Survey (Feb 2021): • The percentage of businesses in the East Midlands deriving turnover from supplying pro-environmental goods or services increased from 16% in 2015 to 37% in 2021. • 36% of the companies surveyed stated that clean growth is already wholly or partly integrated into their business growth strategies; up from 29% in 2020. • Larger companies continue to be more advanced than smaller firms in integrating clean growth in their business strategies. • However, more than four in ten firms (42%) do not feel well informed about support for clean growth and nearly three in ten (29%) are not engaging with the clean growth agenda – a small decline from 2020. This suggests that whilst opportunity in the Low Carbon and Environmental Goods and Services (LCEGS) market is still strong, awareness and engagement with clean growth opportunities may have been weakened during the 2020/21 pandemic.
  • Multiple emotions, multiple selves: compassion focused therapy chairwork

    Bell, Tobyn; Montague, Jane; Elander, James; Gilbert, Paul; University of Derby (Cambridge University Press (CUP), 2021-07-19)
    Compassion focused therapy (CFT) is rooted in an evolutionary view of the human mind as formed of a multitude of contrasting, and often conflicting, motivations, emotions and competencies. A core aim of the therapy is to help clients understand the nature of their mind in a way that is de-pathologizing and de-shaming. The approach is also focused on the cultivation of compassion to work with these difficult aspects of mind. CFT includes the ‘multiple-selves’ intervention which involves the differentiation of threat-based emotion and an exploration of their conflict. Compassion is then applied to the client’s affective world to aid regulation and integration. This paper focuses on clients’ experiences of a chairwork version of multiple-selves, wherein clients personify their emotions in separate chairs. Nine participants with depression were interviewed directly following the intervention and the resulting data were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Three interconnecting themes were identified: appreciating emotional complexity; the role of chairwork process; and compassionate integration. The results highlight the importance of emotional differentiation in understanding internal multiplicity and conflict in depression, and the role of compassion in creating a sense of personal coherence. The embodied and enactive nature of chairwork was found to be of benefit in identifying and separating emotion, and in developing new forms of self-relating. The paper discusses the clinical implications of such findings for the treatment of depression.
  • A comprehensive review on the output voltage/power of wearable thermoelectric generators concerning their geometry and thermoelectric materials

    Soleimani, Zohreh; Zoras, Stamatis; Ceranic, Boris; Cui, yuanlong; Shahzad, Sally; University of Derby; University of Sheffield (Elsevier, 2021-07-09)
    Wearable thermoelectric generators (TEGs) are considered as a promising power supply for low power wearable electronics. To obtain high thermoelectric (TE) generation, the focus should be on two main factors, including TE materials and the configurations of TE legs. Concerning these two factors, this paper provides a comprehensive review of recent studies on wearable TEGs. In general, TE materials can be classified into three categories, including inorganic, organic, and hybrid (inorganic-organic). In addition, the TE legs can be prepared in three different configurations, including ingot-shaped, film-shaped, and yarn-shaped. Based on the reviewed literatures, the superior output powers of all the three configurations were achieved by the inorganic, hybrid, and organic TE materials, respectively. It should be noted that the ingot- and the yarn-shaped legs were mostly composed of the inorganic and the organic TE materials, respectively. Whereas, all the three types of TE materials were almost equally used to prepare the film-shaped legs. Regarding power density, the ingot-shaped legs stood first followed by the film- and the yarn-shaped legs, respectively. Precisely, the output powers of the ingot- and the film-shaped legs were at µW/cm2 level, dropping to nW/cm2 for the yarn-shaped legs.
  • Challenges in the Implementation of Lean Manufacturing in the Wood & Furniture Industry

    Abu, F; Saman, M.Z.M; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Gholami, H; Zakuan, N; Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Skudai, Malaysia; University of Derby (Emerald, 2021-08-03)
    This study analyses the challenges in implementing lean manufacturing (LM) in the wood & furniture industry. In order to facilitate the smooth implementation of LM practices in this industry, the challenges in terms of its deployment need to be analysed and observed. Realising this importance, this study proposes a model, using PLS-SEM, which focuses on dealing with the challenges faced in the implementation of lean in the wood & furniture industry. The model consists of ten challenges that were determined based on a survey involving 46 SMEs companies in Malaysia. The findings revealed that the implementation of LM is significantly affected by 3 main issues, namely: knowledge, resources, and, culture and human attitude. Furthermore, the analyses also highlighted four dominant challenges which are related to culture and human attitude issues – lack of employee commitment, lack of senior management’s interest and support, difficult to implement, and LM is viewed as “current trend”. Overall, the ability to deal with the challenges involving factors of knowledge, and culture and human attitude, determine the success of LM implementation, especially in companies that have limited resources. This study would help wood & furniture SMEs, government agencies, professional bodies, and academics to better understand the challenges when implementing LM practices. Overall, this study aims at investigating the relationships between the three challenges to better promote LM in the scope under study. Therefore, several activities were proposed to overcome the abovementioned challenges and subsequently contributing to the current body of knowledge.
  • Assisting you to advance with ethics in research: an introduction to ethical governance and application procedures

    Sivasubramaniam, Shivadas; Dlabolová, Henek Dlabolova; Kralikova, Veronika; Reza Khan, Zeenath; University of Derby; Mendel University in Brno, Zemědělská, 1665, Brno, Czechia; University of Wollongong in Dubai, Dubai, UAE (Springer Nature, 2021-07-13)
    Ethics and ethical behaviour are the fundamental pillars of a civilised society. The focus on ethical behaviour is indispensable in certain fields such as medicine, finance, or law. In fact, ethics gets precedence with anything that would include, affect, transform, or influence upon individuals, communities or any living creatures. Many institutions within Europe have set up their own committees to focus on or approve activities that have ethical impact. In contrast, lesser-developed countries (worldwide) are trying to set up these committees to govern their academia and research. As the first European consortium established to assist academic integrity, European Network for Academic Integrity (ENAI), we felt the importance of guiding those institutions and communities that are trying to conduct research with ethical principles. We have established an ethical advisory working group within ENAI with the aim to promote ethics within curriculum, research and institutional policies. We are constantly researching available data on this subject and committed to help the academia to convey and conduct ethical behaviour. Upon preliminary review and discussion, the group found a disparity in understanding, practice and teaching approaches to ethical applications of research projects among peers. Therefore, this short paper preliminarily aims to critically review the available information on ethics, the history behind establishing ethical principles and its international guidelines to govern research. The paper is based on the workshop conducted in the 5th International conference Plagiarism across Europe and Beyond, in Mykolas Romeris University, Lithuania in 2019. During the workshop, we have detailed a) basic needs of an ethical committee within an institution; b) a typical ethical approval process (with examples from three different universities); and c) the ways to obtain informed consent with some examples. These are summarised in this paper with some example comparisons of ethical approval processes from different universities. We believe this paper will provide guidelines on preparing and training both researchers and research students in appropriately upholding ethical practices through ethical approval processes.
  • Beyond theoretical: integrating a live project brief into an interior design module

    Jones, Rhiannon; Slabbert, Barend; McMahon, Daithi; Di Monte-Milner, Giovanna; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2021-07-20)
  • Theorising career guidance policymaking: watching the sausage get made

    Hooley, Tristram; Godden, Lorraine; University of Derby; Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada (Informa UK Limited, 2021-07-14)
    In this article, we propose a framework for understanding career guidance policy. We use a systems theory approach informed by Gramscian theories of politics and power to make sense of this complexity. Firstly, we argue that career guidance policy is made by and for people and that there is a need to recognise all of the political and civil society actors involved. Secondly, we argue that policymaking comprises a series of ideological, technical and practical processes. Finally, we contend that policymaking takes place in a complex, multi-level environment which is can be described across three levels as the policy framing, middle and street level tiers.
  • Ethics, Impartiality, Locus of Control

    Moore, Nicki; University of Derby (EKS, 2021-05-01)
    Those working in ‘helping’ professions will occasionally be presented with issues that feel uncomfortable, challenge their own values and beliefs, and result in ethical dilemmas associated with choosing appropriate attitudes, behaviours and approaches. In the career development context, ethics refers to the moral principles that govern the way practitioners practice. This article provides a dialogue between two practitioners, who, discuss an ethical dilemma and try to decide on an appropriate course of action.
  • A Framework for Assessing Sustainability in Multi-tier Supply Chains using Empirical Evidence and Fuzzy Expert System

    Shayganmehr, Masoud; Kumar, Anil; Lutha, Sunil; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Iran; London Metropolitan University; Ch. Ranbir Singh State Institute of Engineering and Technology, Jhajjar, Haryana, India; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2021-07-12)
    This study investigates various factors for assessing sustainability in Multi-tier Supply Chains (MtSCs) using a hybrid approach consisting of an empirical study and fuzzy expert system. After an extensive literature review, four research questions were formulated and a questionnaire designed. From its distribution, 152 responses were collected from the textile industry. Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) was employed to determine the most effective factors that could contribute to the evaluation of extensive aspects of sustainability in MtSCs as well as recognize the importance of constructs. The categorized constructs based on their importance included “Environmental issues”, “Economic issues”, “Policy and governance”, “Participation”, “Social issues”, “Transparency” and “Leadership and support”. A comprehensive rating for evaluating sustainability by indicating a readiness score and linguistic variables for each construct was developed in the form of a “fuzzy expert system”. The developed fuzzy expert system was applied in an Iranian textile company to assess its readiness status as a case application. The results indicated that the company had the highest and lowest readiness in “Transparency” and “Environmental issues” with total readiness scores of 2.65 and 0.17 respectively. The finding recommends that the company should pay more attention to environmental issues such as making a cutback on utility consumption and increasing recycled materials. The framework’s validity was measured around 90% based on the satisfaction of experts’ judgments, which enables the framework to be applied in different industrial settings. Theoretically, the findings contribute to the Resources-Based View (RBV) theory, with a focus on the sustainability of MtSCs, by unveiling a comprehensive set of factors for assessing sustainability and recognizing external and internal strategic resources that lead firms to sustainable competitive advantages.
  • Evaluating Key Capabilities for Developing Global Collaborative Networks Using a Multi-Layer Decision-Making Approach

    Mahdiraji, H.A.; Hafeez, K; Kamardi, A.A.A.; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; De Montfort University; University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran; University of Derby (Emerald, 2021-07-07)
    This paper proposes a multi-layer hybrid decision-making approach to evaluate the capability alternatives for developing a collaborative network to operate in the international market. The present study is contextualised in the Iranian pistachio export industry. An extensive review of the state-of-the-art literature on supplier collaboration was conducted to identify key capabilities that are essential to establish a collaborative network. The set of defined capabilities were then optimised through interviews with 14 experts from the relevant industry, academics and export authorities. A combination of the fuzzy Delphi method and the best–worst method (BWM) approach was, respectively, used to reduce the number of capability alternatives and assign priority weights to these alternatives. Subsequently, a weighted aggregated sum product assessment method (WASPAS) was employed to rank and evaluate the ability to creating a collaborative network for the export of pistachio. From the extant literature review, 18 capabilities for the formation of coordination networks in the international markets were identified. Then, the prominent indicators in forming a global network were extracted. After ranking the top pistachio export countries/regions to formalise an efficient collaborative network, it was revealed that although Iran exports approximately 30% of the global market, it falls behind the USA and European Union. The competitors have scored higher in critical criteria, including “trust and commitment”, “strategy and management”, “managerial control and standardization” and “financial resources”. The proposed hybrid approach encompassing fuzzy Delphi–BWM–WASPAS offers to solve the capability evaluation and selection as well as ranking the possible alternative to formalise a collaborative network in an integrated fashion. This combination of methods is capable to first identify the most important factors, then measuring their importance and eventually rank the possible alternatives. The suggested framework provides an approach to deal with the uncertainty of global collaborative network formation.
  • Design for environment Ontology-based knowledge management model for green product development

    Benabdellah, A.C; Zekhnini, K; Cherrafi, A.; Garza‐Reyes, J.A; Kumar, A; Moulay Ismail University, Meknes, Morocco; University of Derby; London Metropolitan University (Wiley, 2021-06-30)
    Through appropriate operations and policies, such as green processes and product development (PDP), companies can respond to environmental sustainability. To remain competitive, one such approach, Design for X (DFX), involves considering different environment and sustainable strategies through different factors Xs. With regards to the availability of different DFX techniques that consider environmental issues, the decision as to which approach needs to be adopted remains absent. This paper aims at presenting an overview from 1980 to 2020 of the developed research, applications, and DFX techniques for assessing green issues. Selected DFX techniques are linked with strategies used in organizations. Following a literature analysis, a collaborative knowledge-based framework that addresses the design concepts needed to assess environmental, safety, and health concerns in the development of green products is proposed. Furthermore, as a pillar for considering the Semantic Web and an evolving approach linked with Natural language processing (NLP) and Artificial Intelligence (AI), an ontology-based knowledge management model for green assessment is developed for the representation, acquisition, organization and capitalization of knowledge in a computer interpretable manner. The findings are useful for both managers and practitioners as they provide a coherent domain ontology that can help them manage knowledge, improve teamwork, and make decisions in a collaborative green PDP. Besides, an understanding of the essential design considerations that are required to implement environmental, safety, and health issues, as well as competencies used in the PDP is presented. Key barriers, managerial and strategic implications and mitigation actions are also identified in this paper.
  • Increasing Service Quality at a University: A Continuous Improvement Project

    Gonzalez Aleu, Fernando; Granda Gutierrez, Edgar Marco Aurelio; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Garza Villegas, Juan Baldemar; Vazquez Hernandez, Jesus; Universidad de Monterrey, San Pedro Garza Garcia, Mexico; University of Derby; Continuous Improvement (Analytics), Viakable SA de CV, San Nicolas de los Garza, Mexico; Advanced Value Chain Institute, San Pedro Garza García, Mexico (Emerald, 2021-07-05)
    This paper evaluates a continuous improvement project (CIP) at a Mexican university designed to increase engineering graduate student loyalty. A plan-do-check-act problem-solving methodology was implemented, and a SERVQUAL survey was conducted on 67 master’s engineering students. Five factors were found to affect student loyalty: facility cleanliness, faculty teaching skills, evening student services, master’s degree student management roles at work and master’s degree students’ ages. After the implementation of the improvement and control actions, there was a 7.7% increase in the engineering master’s degree students’ loyalty scores. This research work took a different approach in assessing student satisfaction and student loyalty in a higher education institution (HEI) by using the SERVQUAL survey as the data collection instrument for the conduct of the CIP. However, there were several research limitations: data availability (such as student loyalty, student satisfaction and a small master’s degree student population size) and factors outside the CIP’s scope (such as the country’s economic situation, university rankings, master’s programme accreditations and COVID-19). Practical implications—The findings from this research study could be used by other HEIs to improve student loyalty and as a reference when conducting similar studies in other service organisations such as hospitals and hotels.
  • Personal Guidance Fund Evaluation: Final Report

    Hanson, Jill; Neary, Siobhan; Blake, Hannah; University of Derby (The Careers & Enterprise Company, 2021-07-07)
    Since the transfer of responsibility for career guidance to schools /colleges, a range of approaches to delivering personal guidance have been utilised in schools and colleges in order for them to meet the statutory requirement of implementation of the Gatsby benchmarks. In their report for The Careers & Enterprise Company, Everitt, Neary, Delgardo and Clark (2018) concluded that five key points need to be in place for effective personal guidance (space & time; preparation & feedback, effective interviewing; professionalism and integration) but that ‘the evidence on personal guidance remains a work in progress’. The Careers & Enterprise Company recognised the importance of this of this work, developing the Personal Guidance Fund which aimed to support the development of innovative, cost-effective models for delivering personal careers guidance in schools and colleges. Evaluation aims and objectives The evaluation focused on identifying effective approaches with the intention of improving practice beyond the fund. The report considers: 1. The effectiveness of different approaches. 2. Working with different beneficiary groups. 3. The impact of personal guidance on students. 4. The impact of training on staff and school/college career guidance. 5. Key learning regarding scaling up, sustainability and best practice This report describes the methodology adopted to answer these objectives and outlines key learning with regard to the different approaches adopted and the different beneficiaries targeted. It considers the impact of the programmes on students and the staff who took part in training and provides recommendations for programme providers, Careers Leaders and Senior Leadership Teams in schools and colleges.
  • An exploration of primary school teachers’ maths anxiety using interpretative phenomenological analysis

    Dove, Jane; Montague, Jane; Hunt, Thomas, E; University of Derby (Final International University, 2021-06-30)
    Primary school teachers are important in children’s learning of mathematics, and maths anxiety development has been partly attributed to children’s classroom experiences (Das & Das, 2013). Maths anxiety was explored in UK primary school teachers, with a view to understanding its development and impact. Data from four semi-structured individual interviews were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA), which facilitates a deeper knowledge of individuals’ personal experience. Three key themes emerged: “experiencing the psychological consequences of maths anxiety”, “social influences” and “the consequences of experiencing maths anxiety as a teaching professional”. The findings contribute to our understanding of the influence of maths anxiety on teachers and teaching practices.
  • A Practitioner's Guide to Uncharted Waters of Career Counselling, a Critical Reflection Perspective

    Košťálová, Helena; Cudlínová, Markéta; Blake, Hannah; Clark, Lewis; Dimsits, Miriam; Kavková, Eva; Graungaard, Elisabeth; Moore, Nicki; Sigaard Hansen, Jesper; Neary, Siobhan; et al. (EKS, 2021-05-01)
    This is a practical book intended for career practitioners working with young people in schools and other institutions providing career guidance and counselling. The aim is to offer practitioners support so that they can feel empowered in their roles as career counsellors, and are able to take care of themselves and gain new ideas for their practice. The book is one output of an Erasmus funded project which invovled partners from the UK, Denmark, Greece, Spain and the Czech Republic.
  • Self-identification of electronically scanned signatures (ESS) and digitally constructed signatures (DCS)

    Kazmierczyk, Zuzanna; Turner, Ian J.; University of Derby (Informa UK, 2021-07-05)
    The use of electronic signatures as a form of identification is increasingly common, yet they have been shown to lack the dynamic features found in online signatures. In this study, handwritten signatures were scanned to produce electronically scanned signatures (ESS) which were then digitally altered to produce digitally constructed signatures (DCS). The ESS and DCS were presented back to participants to identify which were genuine. Only 1% of participants correctly identified all signatures, with a mean score of 57.6% identifications. The lack of self-recognition of ESS raises questions on their reliability and usefulness as means of personal identification.
  • Circular Economy: Exploratory Study of Steel Industry in Thailand

    Piyathanavong, Vichathorn; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Huynh, Van-Nam; Olapiriyakul, Sun; Karnjana, Jessada; University of Derby (IEOM Society, 2021-06)
    The Circular Economy (CE) is widely known as a possible solution to address sustainable development in the manufacturing sector. This paper investigates the adoption status of CE in the steel industry of Thailand. A survey questionnaire was designed, validated, and distributed among Thai steel manufacturing companies. The result of the study indicates that some of the participants’ organization had already implemented the CE. The implementation success of CE is moderate-high. The CE is found to be implemented mainly at the departmental level, rather than across the entire organization. The main drivers of CE implementation are internal motivations, including environmental awareness, long-term sustainable development, and cost savings from material circularity. Furthermore, reducing the environmental impact on external stakeholders is the main CE external driver. A lack of proper training and knowledge, too much effort required, and a lack of support from top management are the main barriers to implementing the CE. This study offers direct benefits for academics, researchers, and steel manufacturing companies who are interested in CE implementation. It also shows the initial evidence of CE adoption in the Thai steel manufacturing industry.
  • ‘It’s quite a taboo subject’: an investigation of mother’s experiences of breastfeeding beyond infancy and the challenges they face

    Jackson, Jessica; Hallam, Jenny; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2021-06-10)
    Current recommendations state that women should breastfeed their child up to 2 years and beyond. However, the UK has one of the lowest breastfeeding rates in the world. This could in part be explained by the stigma mothers face when breastfeeding an older child. This research aims to provide a detailed understanding of what motivates women to continue breastfeeding beyond infancy and the barriers they face to (i) add to existing research literature which has examined this area and (ii) support and normalize this practice. Semi-structured interviews were conducted between April and June 2018 with 24 women who had breastfed at least one child past 12 months. A theory-driven thematic analysis identified themes that ran through the interviews centering on the benefits of continued breastfeeding, the stigma mothers faced when breastfeeding past infancy and the challenges of returning to work. The women felt that continued breastfeeding enabled them to play a central role in their child’s health and develop an attachment led parental style but faced social and cultural stigma due to a lack of public awareness of current breastfeeding recommendations. Interventions which raise awareness of breastfeeding beyond infancy are needed to normalize this practice in the UK.
  • Sea urchin diseases: Effects from individuals to ecosystems

    Sweet, Michael; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2020-01-08)
    Diseases affect all facets of life, at the cell, tissue, organ, individual, population, and ecosystem level, and those associated with marine organisms are no exception. In particular, echinoids are one group which have had well-documented disease outbreaks in the marine biome. For example, over 40 species of sea stars from the west coast of North America have recently been found to suffer from an outbreak of a disease known as sea star wasting syndrome or Asteroid idiopathic wasting syndrome (Eisenlord et al., 2016). Although similar “die-offs” have occurred in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s, this recent outbreak has run at unprecedented magnitude, with upward of 60% disease prevalence at some sites and records across a wide geographic area (e.g., 84% of sites surveyed within one study)—see www.eeb.ucsc.edu. This is now being heralded as the greatest recorded mass mortality of a marine animal, exceeding the previous record, which was Diadema antillarum and their die-off in the Caribbean during the 1980s (Lessios et al., 1984a, Mumby et al., 2006). However, quite surprisingly, the causal agent for both diseases remains unknown (Lessios et al., 1984b, Miner et al., 2018). Various hypotheses have been suggested, from bacteria to viruses, however, evidence is lacking to point convincingly to one agent over another (Clemente et al., 2014).
  • Completing the life cycle of a broadcast spawning coral in a closed mesocosm

    Craggs, Jamie; Guest, James; Davis, Michelle; Sweet, Michael; University of Derby; Newcastle University; Horniman Museum and Gardens, London (Informa UK Limited, 2020-04-28)
    Studies of broadcast spawning in corals are fundamental to our understanding of early life history characteristics, reproductive biology, restoration etc. Spawning of corals for research is routinely conducted, but this is mostly restricted to sites adjacent to reefs and from broodstock collected from the wild just prior to gamete release. Only recently has it been possible to induce predictable broadcast spawning in an ex situ environment, and nobody has successfully closed the life cycle (i.e., production of an F2 generation) of these corals. Here, for the first time, we closed the life cycle of the broadcast spawning coral Acropora millepora in a fully closed ex situ mesocosm. This breakthrough has numerous implications for our understanding of reproductive biology, specifically it offers potential to deepen our understanding of the genetic influence on adaptive traits such as heat tolerance, growth and disease resistance over multiple generations.

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