Now showing items 21-40 of 6042

    • Subjective experiences of participatory arts engagement of healthy older people and explorations of creative ageing

      Bradfield, E.; University of Derby (Elsevier BV, 2021-08-04)
      The aim of this article was to report findings from a qualitative focus group study conducted to understand the subjective experiences of community-dwelling healthy older people engaging in a range of participatory arts activities. The article also uses the participants' voices to consider nuances and interconnections of themes to unpack the complexities of ‘participatory arts’ engagement and support a conceptualisation of ‘creative ageing’. This study involved qualitative focus group interviews. Focus group interviews were conducted with five groups of healthy older people (aged ≥50 years) living in the community (i.e. not in residential care settings). Participants were recruited through self-selected sampling, and on the basis of self-reporting, no diagnosis of ill-health. Focus group interviews were digitally recorded and analysed using thematic analysis. Themes developed from a systematic review of participatory arts for promoting well-being in later life conducted previously by the author were used as the stimulus for conversation in the focus groups. Interviews were not transcribed, rather pseudonymised quotations are used to support the themes. The study also explored barriers to participation, although these findings are not reported here. Subjective experiences of participatory arts engagement of healthy older people focused on everyday creativity and reflections on the term ‘participation’, which challenge the traditional focus of arts and health research on the effects of active engagement. Healthy older people experienced a sense of achievement and ‘flow’ through creative engagement, which led to opportunities for social interaction and developing a sense of purpose. Through transitions of ageing, older people found creative ways of rediscovering their identity in later life, which supported resilience and highlighted a connection between body, mind and soul. Findings suggest that participation in everyday creative experiences can lead to a sense of achievement and purpose, which provides support and structure in the construction of changing identity in later life. Participatory arts engagement is particularly instrumental during transitions of ageing. This study provides a conceptualisation of ‘creative ageing’ which challenges traditional ideas of ‘participatory arts’ and audience engagement by focusing on subjectivities of the participant voice. The framework moves debate beyond a focus on the efficacy of arts engagement to consider the relevance of subjective experiences of everyday creativity in later life.
    • 'Mixed white and Black Caribbean' millennials in Britain: An exploration of identity

      Clarke, Yasmine; University of Derby (Wiley, 2021-07-26)
      This study presents a qualitative exploration of individuals identifying as ‘mixed white and Black Caribbean’ (MWBC) in Britain. The focus of this research aimed to answer the question, 'how do mixed white and Black Caribbean millennials in Britain experience their identity?' Six participants, aged 22–31 years, were interviewed about their family, relationships and personal values. The results were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis and highlighted three main themes: ‘Public Perception’, ‘Caribbean Heritage’ and ‘Conversations’. Each theme was analysed from an integrative psychotherapeutic viewpoint, before concluding with suggestions for counsellors and psychotherapists working with this client group in clinical practice.
    • Predictors of poor 6-week outcome in a cohort of major depressive disorder patients treated with antidepressant medication: the role of entrapment

      Carvalho, Serafim; Caetano, Filipa; Pinto-Gouveia, José; Mota-Pereira, Jorge; Maia, Dulce; Pimentel, Paulo; Priscila, Cátia; Gilbert, Paul; Hospital de Magalhães Lemos, Porto, Portugal; Universidade de Coimbra, Portugal; et al. (Informa UK Limited, 2020-07-10)
      Only a small number of consistent processes predict which depressed patients will achieve remission with antidepressant medication. One set of processes is that of social ranking strategies/variables that are related to life events and severe difficulties. Particularly, defeat and entrapment predict poorer response to antidepressants. However, results are inconsistent. The current study aimed to evaluate evolutionary strategies, childhood maltreatment, neglect and life events and difficulties (LEDs) as predictors of remission in depressed patients undergoing pharmacological treatment in a psychiatric outpatient sample. A cohort of 139 depressed outpatients undergoing pharmacological treatment was followed prospectively in a naturalistic study for 6 weeks. Two major evaluations were considered at baseline and 6 weeks. We allocated patients to a pharmacological treatment algorithm for depression – the Texas Medication Algorithm Project. Variables evaluated at baseline and tested as predictors of remission included demographic and clinical data, severity of depression, social ranking, evolution informed variables, LEDs and childhood maltreatment. Of the 139 patients, only 24.5% were remitted at week 6. In univariate analyses, non-remitted patients scored significantly higher in all psychopathology and vulnerability scales except for submissive behaviour and internal entrapment. For the logistic regression, a higher load of LEDs of the entrapment and humiliation dimension in the year before the index episode (OR = 6.62), and higher levels external entrapment in the Entrapment Scale (OR = 1.10) predicted non-remission. These variables accounted for 28.7% of the variance. Multivariate analysis revealed that external entrapment was the only predictor of non-remission.
    • The flows of compassion in adolescents as measured by the compassionate engagement and action scales

      Cunha, Marina; Galhardo, Ana; Gilbert, Paul; Rodrigues, Cátia; Matos, Marcela; University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal; University of Derby (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2021-07-23)
      The development of self-report instruments assessing the different facets of compassion adapted for different age groups is crucial for research and clinical practice. This study examined the factor structure and psychometric properties of the adaptation to adolescents of the Compassionate Engagement and Action Scales (CEAS-A) in a sample of 674 Portuguese adolescents. Confirmatory factor analyses showed that the factor structure of the CEAS-A was similar to the one found in the adults’ version, with higher-order factor models encompassing two first/s-order factors in each scale (Engagement and Actions). The CEAS-A revealed good construct validity, reliability, and temporal stability. Gender differences were found in Self-compassion and Compassion for Other scales. Path analysis results indicated that self-criticism had a direct negative impact on adolescents’ life satisfaction, whereas the impact of self-reassurance on life satisfaction was partially mediated by self-compassion and compassion from others. The CEAS-A is the first self-report instrument that allows for the assessment of the three different flows of compassion in adolescents and may be an important and useful tool for research and clinical practice.
    • Policing in a pandemic: a commentary on officer well-being during COVID-19

      Edwards, Ann-Marie; Kotera, Yasuhiro; University of Derby (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2021-07-24)
      The role of police officers during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic is challenging, faced with the difficult task of keeping communities safe and preventing the spread of COVID-19 while putting their physical and mental health at risk. Emerging evidence points to the stress experiences of officers during the COVID-19 pandemic. With cases now surpassing 174 million and close to four million deaths worldwide, as well as stringent lockdown measures, police officers are faced with unprecedented challenges resulting from the pandemic. This commentary suggests police departments strengthen resources by putting in place appropriate emergency planning for future public health incidents, in addition to preparing for temporary or permanent loss of human resources. It is important to implement robust training plans post-pandemic to allow officers to offer better care for communities when faced with future public health emergencies. Finally, police officers should be provided with the resources and support to cope with the stresses associated with COVID-19.
    • Self-compassion in Irish social work students: Relationships between resilience, engagement and motivation

      Kotera, Yasuhiro; Tsuda-McCaie, Freya; Edwards, Ann-Marie; Bhandari, Divya; Maughan, Geraldine; University of Derby; Medical Governance Research Institute, Tokyo, Japan; Limerick Institute of Technology, Limerick, Ireland (MDPI AG, 2021-08-02)
      Self-compassion recognises a meaning of life's suffering, aligning with existential positive psy-chology. Although this construct is known to protect our mental health, how to augment self-compassion remains to be evaluated. Social work students suffer from high rates of mental health problems, however research into self-compassion in this population remains to be devel-oped. This study aimed to evaluate i) relationships between self-compassion and more tradition-al positive constructs—resilience, engagement and motivation, and ii) differences of these con-structs between the levels of studies, to inform how self-compassion can be enhanced in social work students. One hundred twenty-nine Irish social work students completed self-report scales regarding self-compassion, resilience, engagement and motivation. Correlation, regression, and one-way MANOVA were conducted. Self-compassion was associated with gender, age, resili-ence, engagement and intrinsic motivation. Resilience and intrinsic motivation were significant predictors of self-compassion. There was no significant difference in the levels of these constructs between the levels of studies. Findings suggest that social work educators across different levels can strengthen students’ resilience and intrinsic motivation to cultivate the students' self-compassion. Moreover, the close relationships between self-compassion, resilience and in-trinsic motivation indicate that orienting students to a meaning of the studies helps their mental health.
    • Student perspectives on improving mental health support services at university

      Priestley, Michael; Broglia, Emma; Hughes, Gareth; Spanner, Leigh; Durham University; University of Sheffield; University of Derby; Student Minds, Leeds (Wiley, 2021-02-08)
      Drawing on thematic analysis of six student co-creation panels, conducted during the Student Minds University Mental Health Charter consultations, this paper elucidates students’ perspectives and proposals regarding the current issues and challenges around university student mental health and well-being support services. In particular, panels identified existing challenges and opportunities to improve support service access, strategy, and delivery. The panels generated a series of recommendations aimed to establish a clear, coordinated, and strategic approach to delivering accessible and inclusive student mental health support services that are responsive to the diverse needs of the whole student population. Significantly, the student panels situated service reforms within a ‘whole university approach’ entailing holistic structural and cultural change to the university environment, in order to enrich student mental health and well-being and reduce demand on services. The findings of this paper can both reaffirm and specify the principles of good practice propounded by the University Mental Health Charter from a student perspective.
    • A systematic literature review of machine learning applications for community-acquired pneumonia

      Lozano-Rojas, Daniel; Free, Robert C.; McEwan, Alistair A.; Woltmann, Gerrit; University of Leicester; University of Derby; University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester (Springer, 2021-08-15)
      Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an acute respiratory disease with a high mortality rate. CAP management follows clinical and radiological diagnosis, severity evaluation and standardised treatment protocols. Although established in practice, protocols are labour intensive, time-critical and can be error prone, as their effectiveness depends on clinical expertise. Thus, an approach for capturing clinical expertise in a more analytical way is desirable both in terms of cost, expediency, and patient outcome. This paper presents a systematic literature review of Machine Learning (ML) applied to CAP. A search of three scholarly international databases revealed 23 relevant peer reviewed studies, that were categorised and evaluated relative to clinical output. Results show interest in the application of ML to CAP, particularly in image processing for diagnosis, and an opportunity for further investigation in the application of ML; both for patient outcome prediction and treatment allocation. We conclude our review by identifying potential areas for future research in applying ML to improve CAP management. This research was co-funded by the NIHR Leicester Biomedical Research Centre and the University of Leicester.
    • Food for thought – empowering consumers: a critique of EU food labelling law

      Meiselles, Michala; University of Derby (Irish Society of European Law, 2021)
      Intended to support a sensible and independent decision-making process by consumers whilst preventing the spread of misinformation, food information is an essential means of communication with consumers. This paper asks how the effectiveness of the current system of food information in the European Union (EU) can be improved from the point of view of the consumer? To answer this question, the author looks at the deficiencies of the existing regulatory framework to show that whilst the current structure provides consumers with comprehensive and reliable information, the mechanics of the system are inadequate. In light of these gaps, the paper advocates the position that the EU should consider introducing a mandatory FOPNL (front-of-package nutrition label) supported by an information campaign, aimed at enhancing the ability of consumers to use food information to make rational and healthy food choices. To this end, this paper looks at the existing regulatory framework (part 1) before exploring the literature on mandatory disclosure regulation and highlighting the problems associated with food information from the consumer’s perspective (part 2). In the final segment, this paper looks at FOPNLs and the way in which the latter can be combined with an information campaign to enhance consumer food labelling literacy.
    • An Analysis of Frequency of Continuous Blood Pressure Variation and Haemodynamic Responses during Haemodialysis.

      Latha Gullapudi, Venkata R; White, Kelly; Stewart, Jill; Stewart, Paul; Eldehni, Mohammed T; Taal, Maarten W; Selby, Nicholas M; University of Derby; University of Nottingham (Karger, 2021-07-22)
      Higher beat-to-beat blood pressure (BP) variation during haemodialysis (HD) has been shown to be associated with elevated cardiac damage markers and white matter ischaemic changes in the brain suggesting relevance to end-organ perfusion. We aimed to characterize individual patterns of BP variation and associated haemodynamic responses to HD. Fifty participants underwent continuous non-invasive haemodynamic monitoring during HD and BP variation were assessed using extrema point (EP) frequency analysis. Participants were divided into those with a greater proportion of low frequency (LF, n = 21) and high frequency (HF, n = 22) of BP variation. Clinical and haemodynamic data were compared between groups. Median EP frequencies for mean arterial pressure (MAP) of mid-week HD sessions were 0.54 Hz (interquartile range 0.18) and correlated with dialysis vintage (r = 0.32, p = 0.039), NT pro-BNP levels (r = 0.32, p = 0.038), and average real variability (ARV) of systolic BP (r = 0.33, p = 0.029), ARV of diastolic BP (r = 0.46, p = 0.002), and ARV of MAP (r = 0.57, p < 0.001). In the LF group, MAP positively correlated with cardiac power index (CPI) in each hour of dialysis, but not with total peripheral resistance index (TPRI). In contrast, in the HF group, MAP correlated with TPRI in each hour of dialysis but only with CPI in the first hour. EP frequency analysis of continuous BP monitoring during dialysis allows assessment of BP variation and categorization of individuals into low- or high-frequency groups, which were characterized by different haemodynamic responses to dialysis. This may assist in improved individualization of dialysis therapy.
    • The social marketing paradox: challenges and opportunities for the discipline

      Akbar, Bilal; Foote, Liz; Lawson, Alison; French, Jeff; Deshpande, Sameer; Lee, Nancy, R.; Nottingham Trent University; Antioch University New England, NH, Keene, USA; University of Derby; Strategic Social Marketing Ltd, London; et al. (Springer, 2021-08-22)
      This paper contributes to emerging discourse about the ongoing challenges and opportunities of social marketing as a discipline. The paper presents a qualitative perspective on existing challenges faced by social marketing and offers suggestions for addressing these challenges. Nine semi-structured interviews with social marketing academics and practitioners from six different countries were conducted. Thematic analysis was used to analyse and interpret the qualitative data. The study provides insight into existing challenges for social marketing, classified into three key themes according to their position within or outside of the discipline: 1) poor branding of the discipline as an internal challenge, 2) competing disciplines as an external challenge, and 3) overall reach of the discipline, seen as both an internal and external challenge. The findings suggest that social marketing needs to overcome poor branding issues to sufficiently address external challenges. We conclude by arguing for a more robust marketing of the discipline. While scholars have identified the challenges and opportunities for social marketing as a discipline, they have paid little attention to examining these challenges from the viewpoint of expert practitioners and academics. This paper presents a nuanced contextual understanding of the identified challenges through a qualitative perspective and explores how social marketing can overcome these challenges.
    • Fear leads to suffering: Fears of compassion predict restriction of the moral boundary

      Crimston, Charlie R.; Blessing, Sarah; Gilbert, Paul; Kirby, James N.; The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; University of Derby, UK (Wiley, 2021-07-19)
      Empirical investigations into the psychological drivers of more or less expansive moral thinking are lacking from the psychological literature. One potential driver that warrants deeper investigation is compassion – a prosocial motivation to both identity and alleviate suffering. The current research examined the extent to which compassion, and fears of compassion, act as a driver and inhibitor, respectively, of a morally expansive mindset. We tested these associations across three studies (N = 749) and found robust support for our predictions. Specifically, stronger compassion to others, and greater fears of extending compassion to others, were linked to enhanced and reduced moral expansiveness, respectively. Moreover, over and above empathy and mindfulness, fears of compassion and compassion uniquely predicted moral expansiveness. Finally, compassion was found to consistently mediate the relationship between fears of compassion to others and moral expansiveness. Our findings further our understanding of the psychological factors that may drive and restrict morally expansive mindsets and hold implications for the broader domains of moral decision-making and prosocial motivation as well as the application of practices that are designed to facilitate a compassionate mindset (e.g., Compassionate Mind Training).
    • The role of perceived descriptive and injunctive norms on the self-reported frequency of meat and plant-based meal intake in UK-based adults

      Sharps, Maxine; Fallon, Vicky; Ryan, Sean; Helen, Coulthard; De Montfort University; University of Liverpool; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2021-07-28)
      Perceived social norms refer to beliefs that people hold about what other people do (descriptive norms) and approve of (injunctive norms), and are associated with food intake. However, less is known about whether perceived social norms are associated with meat and plant-based meal intake. Using a cross-sectional survey design 136 participants (aged 19-66 years, mean age=39.63, SD=12.85 years, mean BMI=25.77, SD=5.30, 80.9% female, 77.9% omnivores, 22.1% flexitarians) answered questions about how frequently they consumed meat and plant-based meals, and how frequently they perceived people in their social environment to consume (perceived descriptive norms), and approve of consuming (perceived injunctive norms) meat and plant-based meals. Perceived descriptive and injunctive norms were positively associated with participants’ frequency of meat intake: participants ate meat more frequently when they perceived their significant other to frequently eat meat (descriptive norm), and when they perceived their significant other and friends to approve of (injunctive norm) frequently eating meat. Perceived descriptive norms were positively associated, but injunctive norms were negatively associated with participants’ frequency of plant-based meal intake: participants ate plant-based meals more frequently when they perceived their extended family, friends, and significant other to frequently eat plant-based meals. However, participants ate plant-based meals more frequently when they perceived their extended family to approve of less frequent plant-based meal intake. These results suggest that different social groups may be important for meat and plant-based meal intake, with significant others and friends appearing to be important reference points for both food types. Further research examining the contexts in which the different social groups influence eating behaviour would be of value.
    • Was Quashing the Maji-Maji Uprising Genocide? An Evaluation of Germany’s Conduct through the Lens of International Criminal Law

      Bachmann, Klaus; Kemp, Gerhard; SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities; University of Derby (Oxford University Press (OUP), 2021-07-30)
      Recently, political actors in Tanzania have demanded compensation from Germany for colonial atrocities against various ethnic and religious groups during the Maji-Maji uprising (1905–1907). By analyzing first-hand archival records from Germany and Tanzania, this article examines whether German actions constitute genocide according to the Genocide Convention or the International Criminal Tribunals’ jurisprudence. The authors find strong evidence to support a claim of genocide, and assess the viability of potential compensation claims against Germany; they conclude, however, that such claims would meet significant obstacles due to the concept of state immunity for sovereign actions under international customary law, as well as case law of the International Court of Justice.
    • The experience of loneliness: The role of fears of compassion and social safeness

      Best, Talitha; Herring, Lee; Clarke, Chantelle; Kirby, James; Gilbert, Paul; University of Queensland; University of Derby (Elsevier BV, 2021-07-31)
      There are multiple factors associated with an increasing rate of loneliness. One common thread may be social disconnection and a reduced ability to feel safe in social settings for fear of giving to and receiving help from others. This study used an online survey to explore loneliness and its relationship with related psychological constructs of social connectedness, social safeness, subjective happiness, and fears of compassion in 177 adults (Female = 126), aged 18–70 years. The results showed that those with high loneliness reported significantly higher fears of expressing compassion for others and self, and receiving compassion from others, as well as lower reported social safeness, subjective happiness and social connection compared to those with reported low loneliness. Those with moderate levels of loneliness were not significantly different from the high loneliness group on fears of compassion towards others or measures of positive affect. The findings show that social safeness, and fears of receiving compassion from others or self are highly related to those with high levels of loneliness.
    • The efficacy of the PSYCHOPATHY.COMP program in reducing psychopathic traits: A controlled trial with male detained youth

      Ribeiro da Silva, Diana; Rijo, Daniel; Brazão, Nélio; Paulo, Marlene; Miguel, Rita; Castilho, Paula; Vagos, Paula; Gilbert, Paul; Salekin, Randall T.; university of Alabama; et al. (American Psychological Association (APA), 2021-06)
      To assess the efficacy of the PSYCHOPATHY.COMP program in reducing psychopathic traits among male detained youth. In this controlled trial, a treatment group (n = 58) and a control group (n = 61) answered the Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory-Short (YPIS) and the Proposed Specifiers for Conduct Disorder (PSCD) at baseline, posttreatment, and 6-month follow-up. Treatment participants attended the PSYCHOPATHY.COMP; controls only received Treatment As Usual (TAU). Treatment effects were tested with latent growth curve models (LGCM). At baseline, no significant differences between groups were found. Results from LGCM showed that condition was a significant predictor of change over time observed in almost all outcome measures. Concerning the YPIS, treatment participants presented a significant decrease both in the total score and in the YPIS factors scores when compared with the controls (medium/large effect sizes; growth modeling analysis—GMA d ranging from .58 to 1.12). Considering the PSCD, treatment participants also showed a significant decrease both in the total score and in the PSCD factors scores (except for the grandiose-manipulative factor) when compared with controls (medium effect sizes; GMA d ranging from .53 to .72). Results also showed that treatment effects were maintained 6 months after the PSYCHOPATHY.COMP completion. Findings indicate that the PSYCHOPATHY.COMP is a promising treatment approach to reduce psychopathic traits among male detained youth, suggesting that interventions targeting these traits should be considered in their rehabilitation, as the absence of tailored interventions may increase the levels of psychopathic traits and their associated risks.
    • Videoconferencing for Home Care Delivery in Japan: Observational Study

      Miyatake, Hirotomo; Kosaka, Makoto; Arita, Satoshi; Tsunetoshi, Chie; Masunaga, Hidehisa; Kotera, Yasuhiro; Nishikawa, Yoshitaka; Ozaki, Akihiko; Beniya, Hiroyuki; Orange Home-Care Clinic , Fukui , JP; et al. (JMIR Publications Inc., 2021-09-01)
      Telemedicine has been increasingly used in many health care fields, including home care, where patients receive medical care at home. Owing to the current COVID-19 crisis, the value of telemedicine via videoconferencing is more recognized, particularly in allowing immobile patients to continue receiving care. However, the efficacy of telemedicine in home care settings in Japan remains to be fully appraised. This study aims to identify the use and impact of telemedicine in a singular home care delivery setting in Japan. A retrospective observational study was conducted using patient and other administrative records from a home care clinic. We considered patients who were involved in videoconferencing with home care physicians and telepresenters serving patients during 2018 and 2019. We extracted sociodemographic data of the patients and details of the videoconferencing and descriptively illustrated some specific cases. In a home care clinic in Japan, videoconferencing was conducted in 17 cases (involving 14 patients) over a 2-year period. Of all the cases, 12% (2/17) required emergency transfers and were hospitalized. A total of 88% (15/17) of cases remained; 71% (12/17) of cases were found to need extra medication or to go to a medical facility for consultation, whereas 18% (3/17) of cases were found not to be in need of urgent attention and were asked to rest. Problematic symptoms subsequently improved in 82% (14/17) of cases, and only 6% (1/17) of cases were later hospitalized. Telemedicine was deemed effective for assessing patients’ conditions in the home care setting in situations where home visits by a physician cannot be carried out. Our findings indicate that consultations via videoconferencing are safe and effective, suggesting more active use of videoconferencing in other clinical contexts.
    • The Engage-Disengage Model as an Inclusive Model for the Promotion of Healthy and Successful Aging in the Oldest-old

      Gonot-Schoupinsky, Freda; Garip, Gulcan; Sheffield, David; University of Derby (Informa UK Limited, 2021-09-01)
      Theories relating to healthy and successful aging do not specifically cater for the oldest-old. This predominantly theoretical research considers the relevance of existing healthy and successful aging theories in the oldest-old. It explores a small sample of interviews of independently living oldest-old using Differential Qualitative Analysis. The Activity Theory and the Disengagement Theory were particularly relevant to investigate differences. The Engage-Disengage model was conceived as a pragmatic holistic model to address specific challenges facing the oldest-old. Engage-Disengage reflects attainable healthy and successful aging in the oldest-old according to individual abilities (intrinsic physical and mental capacities), values, and external resources (social, material, and environmental).
    • Teacher education for SEND inclusion in an international context: The importance of critical theoretical work

      Robinson, Deborah; University of Derby (Routledge, 2021-12-31)
      Global commitments to inclusive education have been made in UNESCO’s Sustainable Development Goal, ‘Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for persons with disabilities’ (UNDESA, 2018. p75). With clear evidence that students with disabilities have heightened vulnerability to inequity, teacher education is considered an essential strategy for improving this situation. This chapter explores best practice in teacher education for SEND and inclusion and places emphasis on the importance of theoretical work in the teacher education curriculum. Best practices in teacher education must offer teachers opportunities to resist binary positions on the relevance of impairment to inclusive planning. It argues that critical theory in the form of critical disability studies provides useful theoretical tools, such as the explanation of ‘othering.’ These can make visible and ‘workable-on’, hidden barriers to inclusion including normative discourses. The chapter proposes two practical tools to support critical theorising on practice, reflexive practice, and transgression. Both support critical work on self and system. They also scaffold teacher agency in constructing hybrid forms of resistance/compliance in harmony with the freedoms and constraints operating in local and national sites for practice.
    • A feasibility study of a novel work-focused relational group CBT treatment programme for moderate to severe recurrent depression

      Walker, Nicola; Vernon-Smith, Madeleine; Townend, Michael; Teesside University; Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foundation Trust; University of Derby (Emerald, 2021-09-02)
      No current psychotherapeutic intervention is designed to enhance job retention in employees with moderate-severe recurrent depression. We hypothesized that interdisciplinary, work-focused psychotherapy would have the triple benefits of alleviating depression, improving interpersonal difficulties, and enhancing job retention. To test the feasibility of a new Work-focused Relational Group-CBT Treatment Programme for moderate-severe depression. The new programme was based on a theoretical integration of occupational stress, psychological, social/interpersonal, and bio-medical theories and consisted of (i) 1:1 psychotherapist sessions; (ii) a work-focused, twelve-week group CBT programme; and (iii) optional 1:1 sessions with an occupational therapist. Depression, coping/self-efficacy, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), interpersonal difficulty, and work/social functioning outcomes were assessed before and after group therapy using validated instruments. Intervention delivery, therapeutic alliance, client satisfaction, and programme cost were assessed. While there was no statistically significant change in HAM-D depression scores after therapy (n=5; p=0.313), there was a significant decrease in BDI-II depression scores after therapy (n=8; -20.0 median change, p=0.016; 6/8 responses, 7/8 minimal clinically important differences, 2 remissions). There were significant reductions in clinically relevant psychological distress, coping self-efficacy, HRQoL, and interpersonal difficulties after therapy. All clients in work at the start of therapy remained in work at the end of therapy. The intervention was safe, had 100% retention, and clients were satisfied with their treatment. The Work-focused Relational Group-CBT Treatment Programme showed promising immediate positive outcomes in terms of depressive symptoms, interpersonal difficulties, and job retention that warrant further exploration in a longer-term definitive study.