• Z-boson production in p-Pb collisions at $$ \sqrt{s_{\mathrm{NN}}} $$ = 8.16 TeV and Pb-Pb collisions at $$ \sqrt{s_{\mathrm{NN}}} $$ = 5.02 TeV

      Acharya, S.; Adamová, D.; Adler, A.; Adolfsson, J.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, S.; et al. (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2020-09-10)
      Measurement of Z-boson production in p-Pb collisions at √sNN = 8.16 TeV and Pb-Pb collisions at √sNN = 5.02 TeV is reported. It is performed in the dimuon decay channel, through the detection of muons with pseudorapidity −4 < ημ < −2.5 and transverse momentum pTμ > 20 GeV/c in the laboratory frame. The invariant yield and nuclear modification factor are measured for opposite-sign dimuons with invariant mass 60 < mμμ < 120 GeV/c2 and rapidity 2.5 < ycmsμμ< 4. They are presented as a function of rapidity and, for the Pb-Pb collisions, of centrality as well. The results are compared with theoretical calculations, both with and without nuclear modifications to the Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs). In p-Pb collisions the center-of-mass frame is boosted with respect to the laboratory frame, and the measurements cover the backward (−4.46 < ycmsμμ < −2.96) and forward (2.03 < ycmsμμ < 3.53) rapidity regions. For the p-Pb collisions, the results are consistent within experimental and theoretical uncertainties with calculations that include both free-nucleon and nuclear-modified PDFs. For the Pb-Pb collisions, a 3.4σ deviation is seen in the integrated yield between the data and calculations based on the free-nucleon PDFs, while good agreement is found once nuclear modifications are considered.
    • Zen and the art of living mindfully: The health-enhancing potential of zen aesthetics

      Lomas, Tim; Etcoff, Nancy L.; Van Gordon, William; Shonin, Edo; University of East London; Harvard Medical School; University of Derby; Awake to Wisdom Centre for Meditation and Mindfulness Research (Springer, 2017-07-17)
      Amidst the burgeoning enthusiasm for mindfulness in the West, there is a concern that the largely secular ‘de-contextualized’ way in which it is being harnessed is denuding it of its potential to improve health and well-being. As such, efforts are underway to ‘re-contextualize’ mindfulness, explicitly drawing on the wider framework of Buddhist ideas and practices in which it was initially developed. This paper aims to contribute to this, doing so by focusing on Zen Buddhism, and in particular on Zen aesthetic principles. The article concentrates on the seven principles identified by Hisamatsu (1971) in his classic text Zen and the Fine Arts: kanso (simplicity); fukinsei (asymmetry); koko (austere sublimity); shizen (naturalness); daisuzoku (freedom from routine); sei-jaku (tranquillity); and yūgen (profound grace). The presence of these principles in works of art is seen as reflecting and communicating insights that are central to Buddhism, such as non-attachment. Moreover, these principles do not only apply to the creation and appreciation of art, but have clear applications for treating health-related issues, and improving quality of life more generally. This paper makes the case that embodying these principles in their lives can help people enhance their psychosomatic well-being, and come to a truer understanding of the essence of mindful living.
    • The zones of fragility: outlaws and the forms of violence in the Ottoman Empire

      Cayli, Baris; University of Derby (John Wiley & Sons Ltd, 2016-09-21)
      This study explores the relationship between violence and power through examining the archival documents about the outlaws in the Ottoman Empire from 1852 to 1876. I argue that the outlaws and the use of violence in the public sphere defied the power of the Ottoman Empire. Thereof, the present study agrees with the main thesis of Hannah Arendt about the destructive influence of violence on power. However, I take Hannah Arendt's argument on violence one step further by claiming that the form of violence -whether political or non-political- loses its significance when both public safety and state sovereignty are under great threats at the same time in the zones of fragility.
    • The zoo of the giraffe women: a journey among the Kayan of Northern Thailand

      Nicoletti, Martino; University of Derby, School of Art and Design (Vajra Publications - Kathmandu, 2013)
      In a village in the far north of Thailand, under the stunning light of a tropical sun, surreal women impeccably wearing their ethnic attire, smiling and motionless, offer themselves to the cameras of voracious tourists. Adorned with gorgeous necklaces of shining brass coils, they are the famous “giraffe women”, the epithet commonly used to define members of the Kayan tribe originally from eastern Burma. The vivid contrast between the myths narrating the origin of this ethnic group and their current condition as refugees from the civil war in their homeland provides an outstanding and sharp testimony to life in Thailand’s “human zoos”. A wide selection of photographs taken by the author using primitive vintage cameras from the early 1900s and a poignant short video, shot with Super-8 film, enrich the volume, visually amplifying the unique mood of the written account.
    • ϒ suppression at forward rapidity in Pb–Pb collisions at √sNN=5.02TeV

      Barnby, Lee; Collaboration, ALICE; STFC Daresbury Laboratory (Elsevier, 2018-11-12)
      Inclusive ϒ(1S) and ϒ(2S) production have been measured in Pb–Pb collisions at the centre-of-mass energy per nucleon–nucleon pair √sNN = 5.02 TeV, using the ALICE detector at the CERN LHC. The ϒ mesons are reconstructed in the centre-of-mass rapidity interval 2.5<y<4 and in the transverse-momentum range pT<15 GeV/c, via their decays to muon pairs. In this Letter, we present results on the inclusive ϒ(1S) nuclear modification factor RAA as a function of collision centrality, transverse momentum and rapidity. The ϒ(1S) and ϒ(2S) RAA, integrated over the centrality range 0–90%, are 0.37±0.02(stat)±0.03(syst) and 0.10±0.04(stat)±0.02(syst), respectively, leading to a ratio RAAϒ(2S)/RAAϒ(1S) of 0.28±0.12(stat)±0.06(syst). The observed ϒ(1S) suppression increases with the centrality of the collision and no significant variation is observed as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity.
    • ϕ -Meson production at forward rapidity in p–Pb collisions at √sNN = 5.02 TeV and in pp collisions at √s = 2.76 TeV

      Alexandre, Didier; Barnby, Lee; Graham, Katie; Jones, Peter; Jusko, Anton; Krivda, Marian; Lee, Graham; Lietava, Roman; Villalobos, Orlando; Zardoshti, Nima; et al. (2017-05-10)
    • 가족수당 (Family Allowances in UK)

      Lee, Sung-Hee; University of Derby (Korea Institute for Health and Social Affairs, 2017)
    • Untitled

      Case, Keith; Marshall, Russell; Hogberg, Dan; Summerskill, Steve; Gyi, Diane E.; Sims, Ruth; Loughborough University (Springer Verlag, 2009)
      Anthropometric data are often described in terms of percentiles and too often digital human models are synthesised from such data using a single percentile value for all body dimensions. The poor correlation between body dimensions means that products may be evaluated against models of humans that do not exist. Alternative digital approaches try to minimise this difficulty using pre-defined families of manikins to represent human diversity, whereas in the real world carefully selected real people take part in ‘fitting trials’. HADRIAN is a digital human modeling system which uses discrete data sets for individuals rather than statistical populations. A task description language is used to execute the evaluative capabilities of the underlying SAMMIE human modelling system as though a ‘real’ fitting trial was being conducted. The approach is described with a focus on the elderly and disabled and their potential exclusion from public transport systems.