• R v Hendy: intoxication and diminished responsibility

      Cherkassky, Lisa; University of Sunderland (2007)
    • Rabbit Chain and Run Rabbit Run

      McNaney, Nicki; University of Derby (Oriel Davies Gallery, 2016-10)
      Rabbit Chain and Run Rabbit Run” (Two Screen-prints) exhibited in the Imaginary worlds exhibition. Imaginary Worlds was an exhibition of artworks by 52 illustration and book artists from Wales, other parts of the UK, Europe and Australia.
    • Rabbit Chain and Run Rabbit Run 1

      McNaney, Nicki; University of Derby (2015-02)
      This work is one of a number of responses that have been inspired by and made about the village that I live in. The village has one remaining farm within the curtilage of the built environment and the villager’s occupations have drastically changed over the years. There was 480 acres under cultivation at the time of the Domesday Book and at one time there was thirty working farms recorded in the village. My images focus on the environment, the evolution of the land without the control of the farming community, and the consequences this has on nature & rural living. Exhibited at University of Derby, Nature Connections exhibition and Art via post exhibition at Arts at the Armory in Somerville, MA. USA
    • Race and vocational education and training in England

      Avis, James; Orr, kevin; Warmington, Paul; University of Huddersfield; University of Warwick (Informa UK Limited, 2017-06-05)
      Black and minority ethnic students (BME) are a significant constituency in vocational education and training (VET) and FE in England. Despite this recent research on race and VET has become a marginal concern. Insofar as current VET research addresses social justice, race appears to be a supplementary concern. Although there is a substantial literature addressing race and education, this focuses primarily on schools and higher education. This paper examines why there is a need to develop a research agenda that analyses participation, outcomes and experiences of BME VET students, particularly those on ‘non-advanced’ programmes (equivalent to European Qualification Framework Level 1–3) with uncertain labour market outcomes and who are arguably being ‘warehoused’ in low status courses. The paper reflects on the historically specific reasons for the dearth of research on race and VET, drawing on a scoping exercise of the literature to evidence this. We conclude by offering a provisional analysis that identifies recent shifts in participation among BME groups, locating this in its socio-economic and historical context. Our analysis reaffirms that VET remains a significant educational site for BME groups, but it is a complex racialised site which makes the current neglect of race and VET in academic research deeply problematic.
    • Rachel Heller: pastels and other works.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (Doswell Gallery, 2017-08)
      Catalogue introduction.
    • The Racialisation of Campus Relations

      Mieschbuehler, Ruth; University of Derby (Civitas, 2020-11-20)
      The author of this report, Ruth Mieschbuehler, argues that there is a real danger that campus relations at universities will become racialised. The term ‘racialisation’ – referring to the process of emphasising racial and ethnic grouping – is discussed to show how higher education policies and practices implemented to address the ‘ethnic’ attainment gap are driving this trend. The result of these interventions is that students are ‘minoritised’. In short, they are held to be in need of special treatment. The ‘minoritisation’ of students has driven racialisation on campuses because the higher education sector is trying to understand and address disparities through ethnic grouping. Racialisation, in turn, minoritises students because it denies students their individuality by emphasising their group identities. By reflecting on the so-called ‘ethnic’ attainment gap in higher education, the report finds that what appears to be a significant gap when attainment is reported by ethnicity has been shown to be significantly reduced when other factors known to impact on attainment are taken into account. There is no statistical evidence that ‘ethnicity’ determines educational attainment of higher education students. Yet, as the author argues, policymakers and practitioners believe in the ethnic attainment gap and introduce measures to address it with adverse consequences. Students from minority ethnic backgrounds are believed to underperform academically when they do not. This stigmatises students based on their ethnicity and contributes to the racialisation of campus relations. The practice of defining and grouping students by their skin colour and basing attainment policies and practices on these divisions drives a wedge between people and removes any sense of our common humanity. Meanwhile, the continued rise of a new type of ‘deficit talk’ depicts students as being vulnerable – and ultimately, it denies students the opportunity to develop fully academically while accommodating them to failure. Ruth Mieschbuehler suggests a long-overdue change in approach. Universities need to re-examine the reporting of statistical data on attainment that has contributed unjustly to the perpetuation of the diminished educational status of students from minority ethnic backgrounds. The report concludes by rejecting the practice of grouping higher education students by their skin colour and ethnicity in future policies and practices.
    • Radicalisation, de-radicalisation and counter-radicalisation in relation to families: Key challenges for research, policy and practice

      Spalek, Basia; University of Derby (Springer, 2015-12-29)
      This article explores linkages between research, policy and practice in relation to the role of families in violent and non-violent radicalisation. The article highlights that there are many similarities between the issues highlighted within the research literature and with those highlighted in policy and practice contexts. Both view families as potentially being risky, as well as potentially being a source of protection and rehabilitation. The article also takes a critical gaze towards families, suggesting that this may detract attention away from the wider socio-political factors that also play a significant role in radicalisation. A focus upon families can also inadvertently lead to the creation and perpetuation of a ‘suspect community’. The article suggests that while families can potentially provide a supportive environment for de-radicalisation and counter-radicalisation, safeguards around human rights, information exchange, and child protection must firmly be in place.
    • Radio 2.0: How Facebook is enhancing audience participation for Irish radio audiences.

      McMahon, Daithi; University of Limerick (Academic Conferences and Publishing International, 2014-07)
      As a traditional mass medium radio is proving its flexibility and resilience in an ever more digitalised mediascape by increasing its presence on one of the fastest growing digital platforms, Facebook. With the radio industry in Ireland as a case study, this project examines the use of Facebook by radio producers and their audiences as a medium for deeper interaction and explores the functions this contact serves for the audience member, for the radio producer, and for society as a whole. Based on recent findings, this doctoral research argues that radio producers are increasingly engaging with their audiences through Facebook for commercial reasons, in an effort to build audience loyalty and grow their audience share in a highly competitive industry. Radio audiences are following their favourite radio programmes on Facebook in growing numbers seeking an enhanced media experience and opportunities to exercise their agency as active audiences and participate in the on-air and online conversations. Furthermore, the evidence suggests that public spheres and virtual communities are created on radio station Facebook pages and that some users build social capital between one another through extended interaction. The convergence of radio with Facebook is thus allowing an old medium to remain competitive at a time when digital media is threatening the traditional mass media.The methodology involves both qualitative and quantitative research methods including interviews with radio producers and audience members combined with a survey of the latter, textual analysis of radio station Facebook pages and a longitudinal content analysis of Facebook interactivity across the Irish radio industry. The project is nearing completion and therefore this paper will present the main findings that demonstrate the capacity of radio as a medium to engage with and profit from the introduction of new digital technologies, particularly Facebook.
    • Radio frequency identification (RFID) adoption strategy for strategic supply chain

      Liyanage, Kapila; Gbededo, Mijoh Ayodele; University of Derby (Consortium of UK University Manufacturing and Engineering Department Heads, 2014)
      The on-going trend of applications and implications of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology, and the increasing external pressures on industries operating in the global market is no doubt making RFID adoption unavoidable. This is driving many manufacturers and businesses into “immature” RFID adoption with low records of success. Whilst most existing technology adoption readiness models can help an organisation evaluate its technology adoption readiness, there is no existing model to analyse and resolve the identified barriers in RFID adoption. This paper therefore, investigates the specific RFID adoption issues confronting industries operating in the global supply chain, discusses and develops an RFID Adoption Strategy framework for successful RFID-enabled business. The paper also offers a strategic approach to timely delivery of a successful RFID adoption under global supply chain external pressures.
    • Rain-fed granite rock basins accumulate a high diversity of dormant microbial eukaryotes

      Velasco-González, Ismael; Sanchez-Jimenez, Abel; Singer, David; Murciano, Antonio; Díez-Hermano, Sergio; Lara, Enrique; Martín-Cereceda, Mercedes; Departamento de Genética, Fisiología y Microbiología. Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), C/ José Antonio Novais 12, 28040, Madrid, Spain; Departamento de Biodiversidad, Ecología y Evolución. Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, UCM, Madrid, Spain; University of Neuchâtel, Rue Emile-Argand 11, CH-2000, Neuchâtel, Switzerland; et al. (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2019-12-03)
      Rain fed granite rock basins are ancient geological landforms of worldwide distribution and structural simplicity. They support habitats that can switch quickly from terrestrial to aquatic along the year. Diversity of animals and plants, and the connexion between communities in different basins have been widely explored in these habitats, but hardly any research has been carried out on microorganisms. The aim of this study is to provide the first insights on the diversity of eukaryotic microbial communities from these environments. Due to the ephemeral nature of these aquatic environments, we predict that the granitic basins should host a high proportion of dormant microeukaryotes. Based on an environmental DNA diversity survey, we reveal diverse communities with representatives of all major eukaryotic taxonomic supergroups, mainly composed of a diverse pool of low abundance OTUs. Basin communities were very distinctive, with alpha and beta diversity patterns non-related to basin size or spatial distance respectively. Dissimilarity between basins was mainly characterised by turnover of OTUs. The strong microbial eukaryotic heterogeneity observed among the basins may be explained by a complex combination of deterministic factors (diverging environment in the basins), spatial constraints, and randomness including founder effects. Most interestingly, communities contain organisms that cannot coexist at the same time because of incompatible metabolic requirements, thus suggesting the existence of a pool of dormant organisms whose activity varies along with the changing environment. These organisms accumulate in the pools, which turns granitic rock into high biodiversity microbial islands whose conservation and study deserve further attention.
    • Raising regional academic voices (alongside data) in higher education (HE) debate

      Hayes, Sarah; Jopling, Michael; Hayes, Dennis; Westwood, Andy; Tuckett, Alan; Barnett, Ronald; Hayes, Dennis; University of Derby (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2020-05-13)
      As agendas for data-driven measures of excellence dominate policy in UK Higher Education (HE), we argue that the generic structure of national policy frameworks virtually silences regional voices. This furthers a territorially agnostic discourse about universities, downplays institutional history and purpose, risks concealing innovative practices, and fails to tackle entrenched inequalities. In response, we point to the value of live, place-based debate in HE institutions to highlight distributional inequity, raise local voices and connect these with national policy. Yet even as we compiled this article about HE debate, the Covid-19 pandemic took hold globally, cancelling face-to-face meetings, by necessity. We therefore draw on a postdigital perspective, as we share our individual dialogues in support of debate, via collective writing, against this new backdrop of social distancing and widespread uncertainty. We may not currently be able to convene our Midlands HE Policy Network (MHEPN) debates in person, but we can voice the essential part that regional universities play in connecting global technological and biological change, with local social projects, citizens and industry. Postdigital theory offers one route to understanding that Covid-19 does not sit apart from other political economic challenges in HE and beyond, that we need to debate simultaneously.
    • Raising the profile of health psychology training, consultancy and practice issues through the new Health Psychology Update sub-section.

      Cross, Ainslea; Sheffield, David; University of Derby (British Psychological Society, 2019-03-20)
      A call for papers that share experiences or learning at any stage of a consultancy project, such as the negotiating, pitching and carrying out needs assessment for consultancy, as well as reflections on the outcomes or implementation of applied health psychology work. We are also looking for ‘works in progress’ describing treatment models, the development of applied practice roles for health psychologists or trainees, as well as self-reflections of the experiences of consultancy and applied practice. Contributions are welcomed to provide vital learning for trainee Health Psychologists (HPs) or established HPs looking to upskill in a different area.
    • Ramblings: A walk in progress (or the minutes of the International Society of the Imaginary Perambulator)

      Cheeseman, Matthew; Chakrabarti, Gautam; Österlund-Pötzsch, Susanne; Poole, Dani; Schrire, Dani; Seltzer, Daniella; Tainio, Matti; University of Derby (Routledge, 2020-07-14)
      In this paper, seven writers experiment with ethnographic and artistic responses to each other’s walking practices. The point of departure is a panel held at a conference at the University of Jyväskylä.1 In the morning session, five papers were presented and discussed. In the afternoon the panellists and audience engaged in a series of walking experiments that took us outside the confines of the lecture room, and indeed, the conference venue. In this chapter, we (the panel presenters and cochairs) re-embody this moment by walking together, writing together and engaging our understanding of self and our experiences of walking. This sense of experimentation is open to the reader, to whom we extend an invitation to travel with us through the process of ethnographic knowledge production. Walking is a pedestrian activity peculiarly elusive to academic categorisation. It engages the emotions, involves the senses, invites creativity, brings forth memories and provokes the imagination. All are notoriously difficult to capture in ethnographic writing. Consequently, some of the questions we approached in our initial meeting were focused on possibilities: how can the intangible experience of walking be conveyed in writing? Can walking be archived? What happens in the process of textualisation? Can genres like creative writing and ethnographic fiction help us understand and communicate the “unwritable”, including those emotive, mobile and sensory aspects? Finally, we wanted to know whether walking could be used as a hermeneutic tool – could enactment elucidate that which evades ethnographic description?
    • Randomized trial of a DVD intervention to improve readiness to self-manage joint pain

      Elander, James; Robinson, Georgina; Morris, John; University of Derby (2011)
      A DVD (digital video disk) intervention to increase readiness to self-manage joint pain secondary to hemophilia was informed by a 2-phase, motivational-volitional model of readiness to self-manage pain, and featured the personal experiences of individuals with hemophilia. The DVD was evaluated in a randomized controlled trial in which 108 men with hemophilia completed measures of readiness to self-manage pain (Pain Stages of Change Questionnaire) before and 6 months after receiving the DVD plus information booklet (n = 57) or just the booklet (n = 51). The effect of the DVD was assessed by comparing changes in Pain Stages of Change Questionnaire scores (precontemplation, contemplation, and action/maintenance) between groups. The impact on pain coping, pain acceptance, and health-related quality of life was tested in secondary analyses. Repeated-measures analysis of variance, including all those with complete baseline and follow-up data regardless of use of the intervention, showed a significant, medium- sized, group time effect on precontemplation, with reductions among the DVD group but not the booklet group. Significant use time effects showed that benefits in terms of contemplation and action/maintenance were restricted to those who used the interventions at least once. The results show that low-intensity interventions in DVD format can improve the motivational impact of written information, and could be used to help prepare people with chronic pain for more intensive self-management interventions. The findings are consistent with a 2-phase, motivational-volitional model of pain self-management, and provide the first insights to our knowledge of readiness to self-manage pain in hemophilia.
    • A randomized-controlled pilot trial of an online compassionate mind training intervention to help people with chronic pain avoid analgesic misuse

      Dhokia, Mayoor; Elander, James; Clements, Keith; Gilbert, Paul; University of Derby (American Psychological Association (APA), 2020-04-09)
      Problematic use of prescribed and over-the-counter analgesics is widespread and increasing among people with chronic pain, but the availability of preventative and treatment services is limited. We evaluated a 21-day online intervention based on compassionate mind training in a prospective, randomized-controlled trial. The participants were 73 adults with concerns about their use of analgesics for chronic pain conditions. Participants completed measures of analgesic use, misuse and dependence, plus self-criticism and self-reassurance (self-inadequacy, self-reassurance and self-hate), cognitive impulsivity (negative urgency, lack of perseverance, lack of premeditation, sensation-seeking and positive urgency) and behavioral impulsivity (delay discounting) at baseline, post-intervention and 1-week post-intervention follow-up. Following baseline assessment, participants were randomized to compassionate mind training (CMT; n=38) or relaxation music (RM; n=35), both delivered online. No adverse events or safety issues were reported and high participant retention and exercise completion rates showed that the intervention was acceptable to participants. Repeated measures analysis of variance showed that by comparison with RM, the CMT group had reduced prescription analgesic use (F=6.123, p=0.015), analgesic dependence (F=14.322, p<.001), self-hate (F=12.218, p<0.001), negative urgency (F=7.323, p=0.006) and lack of perseverance (F=7.453, p=0.001) from baseline to post-intervention, and those improvements were maintained at follow-up. The results show that exercises based on CMT principles and techniques and delivered online can reduce analgesic use, risk of analgesic dependence, and some aspects of self-criticism and impulsivity.
    • Rank perception and self-evaluation in eating disorders

      Cardi, Valentina; Di Matteo, Rosalia; Gilbert, Paul; Treasure, Janet; King's College London; University of Chieti-Pescara; University of Derby; King's College London; Institute of Psychiatry, Psychological Medicine, Section of Eating Disorders; London United Kingdom; Department of Neuroscience and Imaging; University of Chieti-Pescara; Chieti Italy; Mental Health Research Unit; University of Derby; Derby United Kingdom; et al. (Wiley, 2014-02-18)
      ABSTRACT Objectives Heightened sensitivity to social comparison and negative self-evaluation have been implicated in the development and maintenance of eating disorders (EDs). This study used behavioral tasks, as well as self-report measures, to examine processing of social rank-related cues and implicit self-concept in participants with EDs. Method Fifty healthy participants (HCs), 46 people with an ED, and 22 people recovered from an ED (REC) undertook an attentional bias task using social rank-related cues and an implicit self-evaluation task. In addition, they completed self-report measures of social comparison, submissive behavior, and shame. Results People with EDs showed vigilance toward social rank-related stimuli and lower implicit positive self-evaluation than HCs. Self-report data confirmed the behavioral findings and showed that people with EDs had higher levels of unfavorable social comparison, submissive behaviors, and external and internal shame than HCs. People who had recovered from an ED showed an intermediate profile between the two groups. Discussion People with EDs have heightened sensitivity to social rank-related cues and impaired self-evaluation at an automatic level of processing. Some of these biases remain in people who have recovered. Interventions which aim to remediate social threat sensitivity and negative bias about self and others might be of benefit in EDs. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2014; 47:543–552)
    • Rapid assembly of high-Mg andesites and dacites by magma mixing at a continental arc stratovolcano

      Conway, Chris; Chamberlain, Katy J.; Harigane, Yumiko; Morgan, Daniel; Wilson, Colin; Research Institute of Earthquake and Volcano Geology, Japan; National Museum of Nature and Science, Japan; University of Derby; University of Leeds; Victoria University of Wellington (The Geological Society of America, 2020-06-25)
      Studies of pre-eruptive processes at active volcanoes require precise petrochronological constraints if they are to contribute to hazard assessment during future eruption events. We present petrological and geochemical data, and orthopyroxene diffusion timescales for samples from late Pleistocene high-Mg andesite dacite lavas (Mg#53–69) at Ruapehu volcano, New Zealand, as a case study of rapid magma genesis and eruption at a continental arc stratovolcano. Assembly of Ruapehu high-Mg magmas involved the mixing of primitive magmas plus entrained mantle equilibrated olivines with mid-crustal felsic mush bodies, yielding hybridized magmas with ubiquitous pyroxene reverse-zoning patterns. Orthopyroxene Fe-Mg interdiffusion timescales linked to quantitative crystal orientation data show that most lavas erupted <10 days after resumption of crystal growth following magma mixing events. The eruption of lavas within days of mixing events implies that pre-eruptive warnings may be correspondingly short.
    • Rapid deployment modular building solutions and climatic adaptability: Case based study of a novel approach to “thermal capacity on demand” and building management systems.

      Ceranic, Boris; Beardmore, John; Cox, Adrian; University of Derby; T4 Sustainability; Green 4 Architects (Elsevier, 2018-02-13)
      In this research, a novel “thermal capacity on demand” approach to modular thermal storage design has been discussed, seen as a key to the climatic adaptability of a proposed Smart-POD building system and its energy performance. Smart-POD is a unique and innovative research project which provides an alternative to traditional classroom design. It proposes a rapid deployment building solution, temporary or permanent in its use, modular in design, flexible in set-up and self-sustaining in use, requiring minimal site preparation, and meeting all its energy demands from renewable energy sources. Its feasibility was tested by a design case study which investigated climatic adaptability based on the proposed approach. This approach uniquely combines balancing of energy demand and supply using renewable technologies and a bespoke low temperature thermal store. It further proposes to use an open source Building energy Management System (oBeMS) conceived in this research, to intelligently manage thermal, ventilation and humidity control strategies which adapt to the climate, season and weather in which the building is placed. The predicted performance of proposed system demonstrates potential for an effective diurnal climatic adaptability, enhanced by integrated passive design strategies, and intelligent modes of building control. The method of BIM integrated sustainable design analysis (SDA) and building management system (BMS) has also been deliberated, as a framework for exploring the integration of proposed building management system into smart building environments (SBEs).
    • The rationale behind a dance movement psychotherapy intervention used in a small research pilot in a further education context to develop awareness about young people's body image

      Bunce, Jill; Heyland, Simone; Grogan, Sarah; Padilla, Talia; Williams, Alison; Kilgariff, Sarah; Woodhouse, Chloe; Cowap, Lisa; Davies, Wendy; University of Derby; et al. (2013-10-04)
      This study includes some of the comments from a small piece of quantitative research conducted in a British Further Education College. It was designed to investigate young people's experience of a Dance and Movement Psychotherapy intervention in relation to their body awareness and their body image.This study includes some of the comments from a small piece of quantitative research conducted in a British Further Education College. It was designed to investigate young people's experience of a Dance and Movement Psychotherapy intervention in relation to their body awareness and their body image.This study includes some of the comments from a small piece of quantitative research conducted in a British Further Education College. It was designed to investigate young people's experience of a Dance and Movement Psychotherapy intervention in relation to their body awareness and their body image.This study includes some of the comments from a small piece of quantitative research conducted in a British Further Education College. It was designed to investigate young people's experience of a Dance and Movement Psychotherapy intervention in relation to their body awareness and their body image.This study includes some of the comments from a small piece of quantitative research conducted in a British Further Education College. It was designed to investigate young people's experience of a Dance and Movement Psychotherapy intervention in relation to their body awareness and their body image.This study includes some of the comments from a small piece of quantitative research conducted in a British Further Education College. It was designed to investigate young people's experience of a Dance and Movement Psychotherapy intervention in relation to their body awareness and their body image.This study includes some of the comments from a small piece of quantitative research conducted in a British Further Education College. It was designed to investigate young people's experience of a Dance and Movement Psychotherapy intervention in relation to their body awareness and their body image.