• The Observatory’ Issue One ‘BEIGE’

      Tomlinson, Tracy (Visual Communication Research Group, 2009-09)
      This is issue one of ‘The Observatory’ is an ongoing research project, exploring colour semiotics and visual meaning. The project was established by myself through the Visual Communication Research Group in 2009 and has received funding from the University of Derby ‘Open Studio’ and Teaching Quality Enhancement Fund. The research takes the form of a periodical publication. Each issue proposes a colour theme, which a collective group of contributors make responses to, thereby creating the content. The responses take the form of words, photographs, drawings and other visual interpretations. The project explores the potential for a ’conversation’ of responses to a defined, named colour to come together in the concrete form of the printed page and for these responses to be shared with one another and a wider audience. The publication has provided a platform for the promotion and encouragement of research activity in the Visual Communication area.
    • The Observatory’ Issue Three ‘TANGERINE’

      Tomlinson, Tracy (Visual Communication Research Group, 2011-11)
      This is issue three of ‘The Observatory’, which is an ongoing research project exploring colour semiotics and visual meaning. The project was established by myself through the Visual Communication Research Group in 2009 and has received funding from the University of Derby ‘Open Studio’ and Teaching Quality Enhancement Fund. The research takes the form of a periodical publication. Each issue proposes a colour theme, which a collective group of contributors make responses to, thereby creating the content. The responses take the form of words, photographs, drawings and other visual interpretations. The project explores the potential for a ’conversation’ of responses to a defined, named colour to come together in the concrete form of the printed page and for these responses to be shared with one another and a wider audience. The publication has provided a platform for the promotion and encouragement of research activity in the Visual Communication area.
    • The Observatory’ Issue Two ‘VERMILION’

      Tomlinson, Tracy (Visual Communication Research Group, 2010-10)
      This is issue two of ‘The Observatory’, which is an ongoing research project exploring colour semiotics and visual meaning. The project was established by myself through the Visual Communication Research Group in 2009 and has received funding from the University of Derby ‘Open Studio’ and Teaching Quality Enhancement Fund. The research takes the form of a periodical publication. Each issue proposes a colour theme, which a collective group of contributors make responses to, thereby creating the content. The responses take the form of words, photographs, drawings and other visual interpretations. The project explores the potential for a ’conversation’ of responses to a defined, named colour to come together in the concrete form of the printed page and for these responses to be shared with one another and a wider audience. The publication has provided a platform for the promotion and encouragement of research activity in the Visual Communication area.
    • Obsessive passion: a dependency associated with injury-related risky behaviour in dancers.

      Akehurst, Sally; Oliver, Emily J.; University of Derby; Aberystwyth University (Routledge, 2013-09-09)
      Grounded in self-determination theory, obsessive passion for an activity has been associated with increased risky behaviour and rigid persistence, both symptomatic of dependence. However, it is unknown whether obsessive passion may predict the development of dependence, and furthermore, theoretically important relationships between basic need satisfaction, passion, exercise dependence and subsequent risky behaviour have not been fully explored. A sample of 100 professional dancers (50fs; 50ms; Mage = 20.88; SD = 2.69) completed self-ratings of risk-related behaviours (doctor visits; following treatment, and warming up), passion for dance and dance dependence. Findings supported the maladaptive nature of obsessive passion in relation to risky behaviour and as predicted dance dependence mediated this relationship. Interestingly, need satisfaction was positively related to both obsessive passion and harmonious passion. Results are discussed in the light of self-determination theory and dysfunctions of obsessive passion, suggesting that professional dancers are at risk of employing maladaptive behaviours if high in obsessive passion, which may be detectable via symptoms of dance dependence.
    • Occupational therapists and assertive outreach

      Newberry, Karen; Terrington, Claire; University of Derby (M and K Publishing, 2016-11)
    • OCR based feature extraction and template matching algorithms for Qatari number plate

      Farhat, Ali; Al-Zawqari, Ali; Al-Qahtani, Abdulhadi; Hommos, Omar; Bensaali, Faycal; Amira, Abbes; Zhai, Xiaojun; University of Derby (IEEE, 2016-03-13)
      There are several algorithms and methods that could be applied to perform the character recognition stage of an automatic number plate recognition system; however, the constraints of having a high recognition rate and real-time processing should be taken into consideration. In this paper four algorithms applied to Qatari number plates are presented and compared. The proposed algorithms are based on feature extraction (vector crossing, zoning, combined zoning and vector crossing) and template matching techniques. All four proposed algorithms have been implemented and tested using MATLAB. A total of 2790 Qatari binary character images were used to test the algorithms. Template matching based algorithm showed the highest recognition rate of 99.5% with an average time of 1.95 ms per character.
    • An odd “foreign policy couple”? Syria and Saudi Arabia 1970-1989

      Belcastro, Francesco; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2019)
      This paper analyses the alliance between Syria and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia during the years 1970-1989. The relations between the two Arab powers were characterized by cooperation and support amid ideological and ‘structural’ differences. This was a stark contrast with the conflictual relations of the previous decade. The change was driven mainly by a reshaping in Syria’s regional policy. The new ‘realist’ foreign policy imposed by Hafiz Al-Assad created an overlapping of interests between Syria and the KSA. Riyadh valued Syria’s role in the region and used its support of Damascus vis-à-vis Israel as a tool to obtain domestic and regional legitimacy. On the other hand Syria benefited from the KSA’s generous economic and diplomatic help. This study will use an approach based on neoclassical realism to show how domestic and international factors led to these changes.
    • The odyssey: school to work transitions, serendipity and position in the field.

      Atkins, Liz; Department of Education and Lifelong Learning, Northumbria University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK.; Department of Education and Lifelong Learning, Northumbria University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK (Taylor and Francis., 2016-02-15)
      Little work on the significance and implications of decision-making has been undertaken since that led by Hodkinson in the 1990s, and the experiences of young people on vocational programmes and their reasons for undertaking them remain under-theorised and poorly understood. Drawing on two narratives from a study exploring young people’s motivations for undertaking vocational programmes, this article explores the relationship between their positioning in fields and career decision-making. The article argues that social positioning is significant in its relationship to decision-making, to the way in which young people perceive and construct their careers and to the influence of serendipity on their transitions. Drawing on a range of international studies, the article explores the implications of these findings in terms of young people’s future engagement with the global labour market, giving consideration to (dissonant) perceptions of vocational education and training as contributing to economic growth whilst addressing issues of social exclusion and promoting social justice.
    • Of apples and oranges? The evolution of “monogamy” in non-human primates

      Huck, Maren; Di Fore, Anthony; Fernandez-Duque, Eduardo; University of Derby, Environmental Sustainability Research Centre; University of Texas at Austin; Yale University (Frontiers, 2020-01-10)
      Behavioral ecologists, evolutionary biologists, and anthropologists have been long fascinated by the existence of “monogamy” in the animal kingdom. Multiple studies have explored the factors underlying its evolution and maintenance, sometimes with contradicting and contentious conclusions. These studies have been plagued by a persistent use of fuzzy terminology that often leads to researchers comparing “apples with oranges” (e.g., comparing a grouping pattern or social organization with a sexual or genetic mating system). In this review, we provide an overview of research on “monogamy” in mammals generally and primates in particular, and we discuss a number of problems that complicate comparative attempts to understand this issue. We first highlight why the muddled terminology has hindered our understanding of both a rare social organization and a rare mating system. Then, following a short overview of the main hypotheses explaining the evolution of pair-living and sexualmonogamy, we critically discuss various claims about the principal drivers of “monogamy” that have been made in several recent comparative studies.We stress the importance of using only high quality and comparable data. We then propose that a productive way to frame and dissect the different components of pair-living and sexual or genetic monogamy is by considering the behavioral and evolutionary implications of those components from the perspectives of all participants in a species’ social system. In particular, we highlight the importance of integrating the perspective of “floater” individuals and considering their impacts on local operational sex ratios, competition, and variance in reproductive success across a population. We stress that pair-living need not imply a reduced importance of intrasexual mate competition, a situation that may have implications for the sexual selection potential that have not yet been fully explored. Finally, we note that there is no reason to assume that different taxa and lineages, even within the same radiation, should follow the same pathway to or share a unifying evolutionary explanation for “monogamy”. The study of the evolution of pair-living, sexual monogamy, and genetic monogamy remains a challenging and exciting area of research.
    • Off-campus learning and employability in undergraduate design: the Sorrell Young Design project as an innovative partnership

      Butcher, John; University of Northampton (Intellect, 2008)
      This article reports on research which explored the opportunity for extra-curricular undergraduate learning afforded by the Young Design Project (YDP), aimed at bringing together HE Design students, industry and schools. The research was undertaken in the context of the importance attached to ‘employability’ as a key driver for recent policy developments in Higher Education (see Leitch review and Cox report), as well as the political importance of Widening Participation initiatives between HEIs and schools. This research investigated the second iteration of the YDP in 2007, with 32 undergraduate students from two design degrees at University College Falmouth (BA Graphic Design and BA Spatial Design) on a project based in four Cornish schools (three secondary, one primary). The research sought to answer the question: what do undergraduate students learn from working with pupils as clients and industry practitioners in the context of a school-based project? This question is explored through a case study drawing on four triangulated phases of data collection: desk research of relevant policy documentation; pre-project semi-structured questionnaire; post-project focus group interviews and individual face-to-face interviews with key gatekeepers. As well as reflecting on the opportunity to engage with innovative learning in design, the findings offer fruitful insights to HE practitioners and policy makers considering issues around off-campus learning. This research recommends notions of ‘employability’ be subject to greater scrutiny in HE policy, since a key finding from this research is the crucial importance of appropriately resourced authentic project partnerships for deep and worthwhile undergraduate learning to take place.
    • Ofsted thematic review and Government action plan: Careers England Policy Commentary 23

      Watts, A. G. (Careers England, 2013-09)
      The Ofsted review of career guidance provision in schools describes in detail the erosion that has taken place as a result of recent Government policies, and the limited nature of current provision in most schools. A Government Action Plan issued alongside the review proposes revisions to the Statutory Guidance for schools, and a limited extension of the role of the National Careers Service in relation to schools, without new funding. The proposed actions fall substantially short of those recommended by the House of Commons Education Select Committee.
    • The oil curse, institutional quality, and growth in MENA countries: Evidence from time-varying cointegration

      Apergis, Nicholas; Payne, James; University of Piraeus; Georgia College & State University (Elsevier, 2014-09-16)
      This study re-examines the impact of oil abundance on economic growth in a number of MENA (Middle East and North African) countries for the period 1990–2013. Given the number of economic and institutional reforms undertaken by these countries in recent years, we incorporate measures of institutional quality to evaluate if oil abundance impacts economic growth differently. The results from time-varying cointegration reveal that better institutional quality reduces the unfavorable effect of oil reserves on the performance of the real economy.
    • Oil on troubled waters: Multi-national corporations and realising human rights in the developing world, with specific reference to Nigeria.

      Yusuf, Hakeem O.; University of Glasgow (2008-04-23)
      This article examines the current state of tension in the Niger Delta of Nigeria. It locates the current unrest in the continued denial of economic, social and cultural rights to the oil-rich communities in the area. The author argues that this denial happened with the complicity and acquiescence of the international community. The Nigerian government as well as multinational corporations operating in the area have not been responsive to the development needs of the people. The article argues that, although the primary obligation for realising the economic, social and cultural rights of host communities rests on the government, multi-national corporations in developing countries, considering their awesome resources and influence on government policies, should be similarly obligated to respect, promote and protect those rights.
    • Oil reserve life and the influence of crude oil prices: An analysis of Texas reserves.

      Apergis, Nicholas; Ewing, Bradley; Payne, James; University of Piraeus; Texas Tech University; Georgia College & State University (Elsevier., 2016-02-27)
      Oil producing exploration and production companies generate revenue from reserves which, from any given well, are depleting over time. The reserve life index measures how long reserves would last at the current production rate if there were no additions to reserves. In this study, we examine the time series behavior of the reserve life index for each of the twelve onshore oil producing districts in Texas. Specifically, we model the relationship between reserve life and the real price of oil within a nonlinear ARDL framework. Among the results, we find evidence of both long-run and short-run asymmetries in the response of reserve life to increases/decreases in real oil prices. Further, the magnitude of the effect is greater for positive changes in real oil prices than for negative changes in real oil prices. The findings are important to operators, investors and policymakers interested in sustainability.
    • An old dog and new tricks: Genetic analysis of a Tudor dog recovered from the Mary Rose wreck.

      Zouganelis, George D; Ogden, Rob; Nahar, Niru; Runfola, Valeria; Bonab, Maziar; Ardalan, Arman; Radford, David; Barnett, Ross; Larson, Greger; Hildred, Alex; et al. (Elsevier, 2014-10-14)
      The Tudor warship the Mary Rose sank in the Solent waters between Portsmouth and the Isle of Wight on the 19th of July 1545, whilst engaging a French invasion fleet. The ship was rediscovered in 1971 and between 1979 and 1982 the entire contents of the ship were excavated resulting in the recovery of over 25,000 objects, including the skeleton of a small to medium sized dog referred to as the Mary Rose Dog (MRD). Here we report the extraction and analysis of both mitochondrial and genomic DNA from a tooth of this animal. Our results show that the MRD was a young male of a terrier type most closely related to modern Jack Russell Terriers with a light to dark brown coat colour. Interestingly, given the antiquity of the sample, the dog was heterozygotic for the SLC2A9 gene variant that leads to hyperuricosuria when found in modern homozygotic animals. These findings help shed light on a notable historical artefact from an important period in the development of modern dog breeds.
    • Old ways, new ways: Theatre artists peopling the media in Uganda

      Kasule, Samuel; University of Derby (African Theatre Association, 2018)
    • Old Wine in a New Bottle: Growth Convergence Dynamics in the EU

      Apergis, Nicholas; University of Piraeus (Springer, 2010-06)
      In this paper, we explore convergence of real per capita output across the European Union (EU) countries, as well as the transitional behavior of possible underlying factors that are responsible for any convergence or divergence pattern. The new panel convergence methodology developed by Phillips and Sul (2007) is employed in a production function growth accounting approach and data from the Total Economy Database and the Total Economy Growth Accounting Database. The empirical findings suggest that the EU countries form two distinct convergent clubs, exhibiting considerable heterogeneity in the underlying growth factors. These findings should help policy makers in designing appropriate growth-oriented programs as well as in setting priorities in their implementation.
    • Older people's experiences of their kitchens: 2000 to 2010

      Sims, Ruth; Maguire, Martin C.; Nicolle, Colette; Marshall, Russell; Lawton, Clare; Peace, Sheila; Percival, John (2013-07-12)
      Purpose – This paper aims to present the quantitative results based on a comparison and evaluation of older people's experiences, needs and wants from their current kitchens, combining and comparing the results obtained from two studies conducted in 2000 and 2010 to see what progress has been made. Design/methodology/approach – A study in 2010 investigated the life-long and contemporary experiences of kitchens of 48 people aged over 60 years of age. The research included detailed questionnaire interviews asking people about their experiences of living in their current kitchen. A previous study, conducted in 2000, asked many of the same questions of 22 people in the same age group. Findings – By combining and comparing the two sets of data it seems that only limited progress has been made in terms of kitchen design meeting the needs of older people between 2000 and 2010. Research limitations/implications – Owing to the small sizes of the samples it is not possible to compare the figures statistically or present them as fully representative of the British older population but while the two samples are limited both had similar characteristics of age and gender, so differences do show potential trends over time. Practical implications – The research refers to guidance and a computer based design tool and identifies a number of practical implications for design. Social implications – As people age their abilities and needs can change and their kitchen may no longer be as accessible or appropriate to their needs. Originality/value – This paper adds to the relevant guidance for designers, developers and managers of buildings where the continued personal use of a kitchen is important for continuing independence of older people.
    • Older people's experiences of their kitchens: dishes and wishes.

      Sims, Ruth; Marshall, Russell; Maguire, Martin C.; Nicolle, Colette; Lawton, Clare; Pearce, S.; Percival, John; Loughborough University (2011)
      A new study is investigating the life-long and contemporary experiences of kitchens of 48 people over 60 years of age. The research includes detailed questionnaire interviews asking people about their experiences of living in their current kitchen. This paper presents the initial quantitative results of peoples’ experiences, needs and wants from their current kitchens. This includes problems experienced with activities of daily life in the current kitchen, changes that have been made or are planned to be made to the current kitchen to increase usability in older age, coping strategies and examples of design that have been found to be really useful to older people.