• NAHT Aspire Pilot Evaluation (Executive Summary)

      Neary, Siobhan; Dodd, Vanessa; Radford, Neil; Institute of Education (2016-01)
      The NAHT Aspire Partner Schools programme is based on a multi-strand approach to school improvement. It utilises a five strand design focusing on, leadership, assessment for learning, learning environment, pedagogy and curriculum, and student and family support. This is delivered within clusters groups, underpinned by distributed leadership and supported by external advisers. The model is aligned with current international research on school improvement and effectiveness. It aims to support schools to progress from a Requires Improvement Ofsted assessment to a Good grading within three years. This evaluation reports on the implementation and the impact of NAHT Aspire at just over the two-year point in the programme (six of the nine term cycles of activity). Participants believe that it has improved their school, has empowered teaching staff and built leadership capacity. In addition, it is cost effective and has provided value for money when compared with the costs of forced academisation.
    • Nanochannel flow past permeable walls via molecular dynamics

      Xie, Jianfei; Cao, Bing-Yang; Tsinghua University (AIP Publishing, 2016-07)
    • Narcissism, social anxiety and self-presentation in exercise.

      Akehurst, Sally; Thatcher, Joanne; Aberystwyth University (Elsevier, 2010-04-10)
      In an exercise setting where impression motivation might be high but self-presentation efficacy low, social anxiety is likely to occur (Schlenker & Leary, 1982). Narcissism is, however, associated with low anxiety, high confidence, and a keenness for social evaluation (Wallace, Baumeister, & Vohs, 2005) and therefore may protect exercisers from social anxiety. One hundred and sixty undergraduates (88 males and 72 females; Mage = 20.45 years, SD = 2.49 years) completed measures of narcissism, social anxiety, and self-presentation in exercise. In females, narcissism moderated the impression motivation/construction– social anxiety relationships. Findings extend our understanding of the self-presentational processes involved in exercise and, specifically, how narcissism protects individuals from experiencing high social anxiety.
    • The narrative nightclub.

      Cheeseman, Matthew; University of Derby (2018-05-04)
      This chapter brings together expertise in film and cultural studies to analyse representations of nightclub dancefloors in British films from the 1990s onwards: Human Traffic (Justin Kerrigan, 1999), Sorted (Alexander Jovy, 2000), Soul Boy (Shimmy Marcus, 2010), Everywhere and Nowhere (Menhaj Huda, 2011) and Northern Soul (Elaine Constantine, 2014). We use these films to identify persistent visual iconographies and accompanying ideological underpinnings within the British dancefloor film. To understand what these lms do not do, we also look by way of contrast to a film from France, Eden (Mia Hansen-Løve, 2014). Our approach links academic writing on dance music and nightclub cultures with analysis of filmic texts, and in doing so the chapter captures a sense of the wider discourse surrounding nightclubs and especially the dancefloors that often form their focus, on- and off-screen.
    • Narratives of family transition during the first year post-head injury: perspectives of the non-injured members

      Whiffin, Charlotte Jane; Bailey, Christopher; Ellis-Hill, Caroline; Jarrett, Nicola; Hutchinson, Peter J.; University of Derby; University of Derby Derbyshire Chambers and Business Link; Canal Wharf Chesterfield UK; Faculty of Health Sciences; University of Southampton; Highfield, Southampton UK; University of Bournemouth; Poole Dorset UK; Faculty of Health Sciences; University of Southampton; Highfield, Southampton UK; et al. (2014-10-23)
      Aim To explore the narratives created by non-injured family members in relation to themselves and their family in the first year after head injury. Background A head injury is a potentially devastating injury. The family responds to this injury by supporting the individual and their recovery. While the perspective of individual family members has been well documented, there is growing interest in how the family as a whole makes sense of their experiences and how these experiences change over time. Design Longitudinal narrative case study using unstructured in-depth interviews. Methods Data were collected during an 18-month period (August 2009-December 2010). Nine non-injured family members from three families were recruited from an acute neurosurgical ward and individual narrative interviews were held at one, three and 12 months postinjury where participants were asked to talk about their experience of head injury. Analysis was completed on three levels: the individual; the family and between family cases with the aim of identifying a range of interwoven narrative threads. Findings Five interwoven narratives were identified: trauma, recovery, autobiographical, suffering and family. The narrative approach emphasized that the year posthead injury was a turbulent time for families, who were active agents in the process of change. Conclusion This study has shown the importance of listening to people's stories and understanding their journeys irrespective of the injured person's outcome. Change postinjury is not limited to the injured person: family members need help to understand that they too are changing as a result of their experiences.
    • National Careers Council, an aspirational nation: creating a culture change in careers provision; Careers England Policy Commentary 21

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (Careers England, 2013-06-10)
      This is the twenty-first in an occasional series of briefing notes on key policy documents related to the future of career guidance services in England. The policy commentary has been prepared for Careers England by Dr Tristram Hooley (Reader in Career Development and Head of the International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby); the views expressed are those of the writer.
    • National guidelines and your continuing professional development

      Bryson, David; University of Derby (Taylor & Francis, 2020-01-23)
      There are several links between the national guidelines produced by the Institute of Medical Illustrators (IMI), the development of evidence-based practice and continuing professional development (CPD). This includes their development, research and testing in practice, their use either to support the development of best practice or their direct implementation. This paper suggests a number of ways to engage with the guidelines to support your professional learning and CPD.
    • National identity and the politics of belonging in Greek Cypriot visual culture

      Photiou, Maria; University of Derby (Springer, 2021-04-12)
      For decades the display of blue and white colours in Cyprus have been synonymous with Greek nationalism. During British colonial rule in Cyprus, there was a rise of nationalism. As a result, the Greek population of Cyprus demanded Enosis (union) with Greece. The rise of Greek nationalism during the National Liberation Struggle 1955-59 was, for the most part, denoted through a national ‘spectacle’ that included the national anthem and the flag. According to Rebecca Bryant (2004: 164), ‘anything which bore the blue and white colors of Greece […] could be constructed as symbolic of Greek nationalism’. This chapter investigates the visual representation of Greek flags and the way images convey nationalism in Cyprus. It focuses on the work of Greek Cypriot artists Takis Frangoudes and George Georgiou, who both employed visual strategies to expose historical and socio-political events in Cyprus. It will explore how the usage of ‘national spectacles’ represented the political events during the anti-colonial struggle. It will also examine how the usage of the blue and white colours of the Greek flag constructs a sense of collective and political belonging during the long and violent history of Cyprus.
    • Nations as zones of conflict, nations as zones of selection: A Darwinian social evolutionary engagement with John Hutchinson's ‘Culture Wars’

      Kerr, William; University of Edinburgh (Wiley, 2019-09-12)
      This paper explores the use of Darwinian social evolutionary theory towards understanding the formation of nations through a specific engagement with John Hutchinson's Nations as Zones of Conflict, particularly the idea of ‘culture wars’. After outlining Hutchinson's framework and the principles of Darwinian social evolutionary theory – namely, the key concepts of inheritance, variation, and selection within an environmental context – I make a case for Darwinian concepts being able to support and expand on Hutchinson's ethno‐symbolic approach. I argue that Darwinian social evolutionary theory offers a powerful explanation for why particular myths, symbols, traditions, and memories endure and are revived and revitalized in nationalist contexts. The development of nationalism in Meiji Japan is used as an example to explore these ideas.
    • Natural convection of power-law fluids under wall vibrations: A lattice Boltzmann study

      Xie, Jianfei; Tsinghua University (Informa UK Limited, 2017-11-07)
    • Natural disasters and housing prices: Fresh evidence from a global country sample

      Apergis, Nicholas; University of Derby (Asian Real Estate Society, 2020)
      Given that the literature on the impact of natural disasters on house prices is highly limited, this paper combines data on natural disasters and house prices from 117 countries, spanning the period 2000-2018 and a panel regression method to estimate the effects of natural disasters on house prices. The findings document that natural disasters lead to lower house prices, with the results surviving a number of robustness tests. When examining the impacts of natural disasters by type, the findings highlight that geological disasters exert the strongest (negative) impact on house prices. The results also illustrate the negative impact of those disasters on house prices when the distinction between small and large disasters is also accounted. The findings provide important implications for policymakers and property investors. Lower house prices in countries experience natural disasters events could significantly signify lower consumption and investment (the wealth effect), with further negative spillovers to the real economy. Economic policymakers could implement low-tax policies or quantitative easing schemes to support these areas/countries. The findings exemplify the need of governments and policymakers to mitigate climate change effects on housing by adopting new, more environmentally friendly technologies and energy sources.
    • ‘The natural foundation of perfect efficiency’: Medical services and the Victorian post office

      McIlvenna, Kathleen; Brown, Douglas; Green, David R; Kingston University (Oxford University Press, 2019-01-23)
      This article explores the creation of the Post Office medical service. Working for the Post Office was relatively well-paid and an increasing number of doctors were employed. Medical provision expanded with the introduction of non-contributory pensions from mid-century and developed into a comprehensive and nationwide service that was involved at all stages of employment, from initial recruitment through to receiving a pension. Post Office doctors assessed candidates’ fitness for work, checked on sick absences, provided free medicine and advice and visited workers’ homes. Doctors were responsible for determining whether or not a worker should be pensioned off on grounds of ill health. The career of the first Chief Medical Officer, Dr Waller Lewis, also illustrates the range of other areas in which the Post Office medical service became involved, including the clinical assessment and relief of sickness as well as identifying preventative measures to improve health outcomes.
    • Nature connectedness, human behaviours, and blue infrastructure: the water effect to people in historical and contemporary masterplanning

      Al-Wali, Wafaa; Tracada, Eleni; University of Derby (Water Efficiency Network, University of Bath, 2020-09)
      Most urban designers and planners have produced anthropocentric masterplans since early twentieth century. Today green infrastructure in cities, including blue infrastructure, primarily expresses people’s relationship to the environment in terms of resource management. Often the natural world is converted into urban green arrangement or a replica of nature mainly for the economic and cultural benefit of humans. Water and related ecosystems were only part of industry as necessity until late twentieth century. Nowadays, water is valued as a very important element of life. Most experts believe that by offering people the opportunity to participate in running and preserving certain ecosystems could have a very positive impact to human health and wellbeing. Environmental psychology suggests that we can provoke heightened experiences in people’s minds by designing dynamic flowing water patterns in urban context. Natural or artificial landscapes, such as green parks should intertwine with the built environment, displaying human creativity and inventiveness. The authors of this paper discuss the importance of water changing culture and behaviours in regenerated green parks in vulnerable urban areas, such as the case study of Arboretum Derby. This particular case study was reviewed by both authors (tutor and PhD student) who shared research with undergraduate students in Urban Design module in this academic year. The student projects reveal the importance of nature connectedness to people seeking happiness and mental balance to counterbalance lockdown hardship, employment loss and social deprivation.
    • Nature Connections

      Jinks, Cameron; University of Derby (2015-09)
      The highlands are now relatively empty with only about 20% of Scotland’s population living in the region, looking at the bleakness of the landscape it is easy to imagine that this was always the case. However, some of the sites I photograph, Aoneadh Mor for example, were forcibly cleared of their tenant farmers in the nineteenth century to make way for more profitable sheep. The result of these, often brutal, ‘clearances’ was a reduction in the population from about 50% of Scotland’s total to 20%. Mary Cameron's eyewitness account of Aoneadh Mor's forced evictions reached a rapt British readership via the magazine "Good Words", and had an enormous impact on developing unease at what had been done in the name of progress. "The hissing of the fire on the flag of the hearth as they were drowning it reach my heart", she said, "The aged woman, the mother of my husband was then alive, weak and lame. James carried her on his back, in a creel." On the ridge of Sithean na Raiplach, refugees destined for Glasgow and the colonies turned for a last look. "The houses were already stripped. The bleat of the big sheep was on the mountain." Aoneadh Mor, the village of the Cameron highlanders, was cleared to make way for sheep.
    • Nature Connections 2016 conference report: Implications for research and practice

      Lumber, Ryan; Hunt, Anne; Richardson, Miles; Harvey, Caroline; University of Derby; Natural England; De Montford University (University of Derby, 2017)
    • Nature contact, nature connectedness and associations with health, wellbeing and pro-environmental behaviours

      White, Mathew P.; Hunt, Anne; Richardson, Miles; Pahl, Sabine; Burt, Jim; University of Plymouth; University of Exeter; Natural England, UK; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2020-01-18)
    • Nature Engagement for Human and Nature’s Wellbeing during the Corona Pandemic

      Richardson, Miles; Hamlin, Iain; University of Derby (Emerald, 2021-05-28)
      To explore the associations between noticing nature, nature connectedness, time in nature and human and nature’s wellbeing during the Corona pandemic restrictions. Natural England’s People and Nature Survey (PANS) data (n=4206) from the UK was used to assess a number of wellbeing outcomes (loneliness, life satisfaction, worthwhile life and happiness) and pro-nature behaviours as a function of longer-term physical time in nature and psychological connectedness to nature and shorter-term visits and noticing of nature. Longer-term factors of nature connectedness and time in nature were both consistent significant predictors of wellbeing measures (apart from loneliness) and pro-nature conservation behaviours. Considered alone short-term visits and noticing were again consistent and significant predictors of three wellbeing measures, but recent visits to nature were not associated with pro-nature conservation behaviours. A combined regression highlighted the importance of a longer-term relationship with nature in all outcomes apart from loneliness, but also revealed that, even when considered in concert with longer-term factors, currently noticing nature had a role in feeling one’s life was worthwhile, pro-nature behaviours and loneliness. The closeness of the human-nature relationship and noticing nature have rarely been examined in concert with nature visits. Further, the reciprocal benefits of pro-nature behaviours are often overlooked.
    • The nature of practitioner research: critical distance, power and ethics

      Appleby, Michelle; University of Derby (University of Cumbria, 2013-10)
      Researching within one’s place of practice allows the researcher to have the unique position of knowing the participants and the research context. The relationship the participants have with the researcher will impact upon the disclosure of information differently than research conducted by someone outside the area of practice. This can be a benefit and a drawback for the participants, the area of practice and the researcher. However, as is demonstrated within this paper, the role the researcher adopts throughout the process of gathering information is not always clear. As a student on the Doctorate of Education programme myself, the nature of practitioner research and the complexities of this type of research is of great interest to me. Beginning to develop my own research project through this taught programme has allowed an opportunity to think through these challenges and wrestle with the complexity and contradiction, dilemma and incongruity which emerges from being a researching practitioner. Within this piece it is suggested that these quandaries can be considered from the perspective of critical distance, relationships and power and ethical considerations. The idea of considering these conflicts reflexively will be explored here. Although this discussion was not based on empirical research findings as such, it is anticipated that this piece will further the understanding of practitioner research in higher education from the position of being a student and through scholastic analysis of the Ed D programme providing a particular perspective on the nature of research.
    • Nature: a new paradigm for well-being and ergonomics

      Richardson, Miles; Maspero, Marta; Golightly, David; Sheffield, David; Staples, Vicki; Lumber, Ryan; University of Derby; University of Nottingham (2016-03-22)
      Nature is presented as a new paradigm for ergonomics. As a discipline concerned with well-being, the importance of natural environments for wellness should be part of ergonomics knowledge and practice. This position is supported by providing a concise summary of the evidence of the value of the natural environment to well-being. Further, an emerging body of research has found relationships between well-being and a connection to nature, a concept that reveals the integrative character of human experience which can inform wider practice and epistemology in ergonomics. Practitioners are encouraged to bring nature into the workplace, so that ergonomics keeps pace with the move to nature-based solutions, but also as a necessity in the current ecological and social context.
    • Navigating drugs at university: normalization, differentiation & drift?

      Patton, David; University of Derby (Emerald Publishing, 2018-10-08)
      Whilst drug use appears to be common amongst university students, this study moved beyond mere drug prevalence, and for the first time in the UK, used the 6 dimensions of normalisation to better understand the role and place drugs play in the lives of university students. 512 students completed a Student Lifestyle Survey. A differentiated normalisation is occurring amongst different student groups; the social supply of drugs is common, and some users are ‘drifting’ into supply roles yet such acts are neutralized. Students are ‘drug literate’ and have to navigate drugs, and their consumption, availability and marketing, as part of their everyday student life. Student drug use is not homogenous and very little is known about the nuances and diversity of their use/non-use beyond prevalence data.  Qualitative studies are needed to better understand the processes of differentiated normalisation and social supply. This is the first study in the UK to use the six dimensions of normalisation amongst a sample of university students