• M11 A randomised controlled feasibility trial of a physical activity behaviour change intervention compared to social interaction in huntington’s disease.

      Busse, Monica; Quinn, Lori; Drew, Cheney; Kelson, Mark; Trubey, Rob; McEwan, Kirsten; Jones, Carys; Townson, Julia; Dawes, Helen; Tudor-Edwards, Rhiannon; et al. (BMJ Publishing Group Ltd., 2016-09-13)
      Background Regular physical activity has health benefits for people with Huntington’s disease (HD), however consistent engagement is challenging. We report the results of a single blind, multi-site, randomised controlled feasibility trial of a physical activity intervention in HD. Methods Participants were randomly assigned to physical activity or social contact control interventions. The primary outcome was feasibility. Short-term benefit was assessed with the Physical Performance Test (PPT), a measure of functional ability. A range of exploratory outcomes including home and community mobility (Life Space), self-efficacy (Lorig), physical activity (International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ)), as well as disease-specific measures of motor and cognitive function were evaluated. Intervention fidelity and delivery costs were established. The trial was registered (ISRCTN 65378754 (13/03/2014)). Results We recruited 46 people with HD; 22 were randomised to the physical intervention (n = 16 analysed); 24 to social contact (n = 22 analysed). Retention, fidelity and adherence met pre-determined criteria. IPAQ scores in the physical intervention group were 142% higher (1.42; 95% CI: [−22%%, 653%]); and self-efficacy for exercise (1.6; 95% CI: [0.6, 2.7]) was also higher. Life Space scores were 12 points different between groups; 95% CI: [−2, 27]. Cognitive function was better in the physical intervention group with 2·9 more correct responses (95% CI: [0.01, 5.9]) on the Symbol Digit Modality test. There were no differences in other exploratory outcome measures and in particular no between-group differences in the PPT (treatment effect: 0.3, 95% CI: [−2.1, 2.7]). Mean (SD) physical intervention per session cost was £56.97 (£34.72). Conclusion A physical activity coaching intervention is feasible, can improve self-efficacy, physical activity behaviours and cognitive function in people with HD and represents excellent value for money in a devastating disease.
    • M2M-REP: Reputation system for machines in the internet of things.

      Azad, Muhammad Ajmal; Bag, Samiran; Hao, Feng; Salah, Khaled; Newcastle University; Khalifa University (2018-08-14)
      In the age of IoT (Internet of Things), Machine-to-Machine (M2M) communication has gained significant popularity over the last few years. M2M communication systems may have a large number of autonomous connected devices that provide services without human involvement. Interacting with compromised, infected and malicious machines can bring damaging consequences in the form of network outage, machine failure, data integrity, and financial loss. Hence, users first need to evaluate the trustworthiness of machines prior to interacting with them. This can be realized by using a reputation system, which evaluates the trustworthiness of machines by utilizing the feedback collected from the users of the machines. The design of a reliable reputation system for the distributed M2M communication network should preserve user privacy and have low computation and communication overheads. To address these challenges, we propose an M2M-REP System (Machine to Machine REPutation), a privacy-preserving reputation system for evaluating the trustworthiness of autonomous machines in the M2M network. The system computes global reputation scores of machines while maintaining privacy of the individual participant score by using secure multi-party computation techniques. The M2M-REP system ensures correctness, security and privacy properties under the malicious adversarial model, and allows public verifiability without relying on a centralized trusted system. We implement a prototype of our system and evaluate the system performance in terms of the computation and bandwidth overhead.
    • The Macaroni's ‘Ambrosial Essences’: Perfume, identity and public space in Eighteenth-Century England.

      Tullett, William; University of Derby (Wiley, 2015-04-22)
      The male antitype of the macaroni and the space of the pleasure gardens in which he reputedly existed have been primarily understood in terms of vision. This article seeks to re‐integrate other senses, particularly olfaction, into our understanding of these subjects. Sounds and smells, of individuals and urban spaces, undermined the idea of the pleasure garden as an enclosed space and the cultivation of the senses it attempted to encourage. The macaroni and his perfumes were an extreme example of this, linking the pleasure garden to the perfumer's shop and disrupting understandings of bodily comportment, masculinity and the proper use of the senses.
    • Machinability of INCONEL718 alloy with a porous microstructure produced by laser melting powder bed fusion at higher energy densities

      Wood, Paul K; Díaz-Álvarez, Antonio; Díaz-Álvarez, José; Miguélez, María Henar; Rusinek, Alexis; Williams, Gavin; Bahi, Slim; Sienkiewicz, Judyta; Płatek, Paweł; Gunputh, Urvashi Fowdar; et al. (MDPI, 2020-12-15)
      Products produced by additive manufacturing (AM) seek to exploit net shape manufacturing by eliminating or minimizing post-process stages such as machining. However, many applications which include turbo machinery components with tight dimensional tolerances and a smooth surface finish will require at least a light machine finishing stage. This paper investigates the machinability of the additively fabricated INCONEL718 (IN718) alloy produced by laser melting powder bed fusion (LM-PBF) with different levels of spherical porosity in the microstructure. The literature suggests that the band width for laser energy density, which combines the various scan process parameters to obtain a low spherical type porosity in the LM-PBF IN718 alloy (~1%), has wide breadth. With the increasing laser energy density and above a threshold, there is a rapid increase in the spherical pore size. In this paper, three tube samples each with different levels of spherical porosity were fabricated by varying the laser energy density for LM-PBF of the IN718 alloy within the stable and higher energy density range and the porosity measured. A low laser energy density was avoided due to balling up, which promotes highly irregular lack of fusion defects and poor consolidation within the alloy microstructure. An orthogonal turning test instrumented, with a three-component dynamometer to measure the cutting forces, was performed on AM produced IN718 tube samples under light cut conditions to simulate a finish machining process. The orthogonal turning tests were also performed on a tube sample obtained from the wrought extruded stock. The machining process parameters, which were studied include varying the cutting speed at three levels, at a fixed feed and under dry cut conditions for a short duration to avoid the tool wear. The results obtained were discussed and a notable finding was the higher rate of built-up-edge formation on the tool tip from the AM samples with a higher porosity and especially at a higher cutting speed. The paper also discusses the mechanisms that underpin the findings.
    • Machine Learning Applications for Sustainable Manufacturing: A Bibliometric-based Review for Future Research

      Jamwal, Anbesh; Agrawal, R; Sharma, M; Kumar, A; Kumar, V; Garza-Reyes, Jose Arturo; Malaviya National Institute of Technology, Jaipur, India; London Metropolitan University; University of the West of England; University of Derby (Emerald, 2021-05-06)
      The role of data analytics is significantly important in manufacturing industries as it holds the key to address sustainability challenges and handle the large amount of data generated from different types of manufacturing operations. The present study, therefore, aims to conduct a systematic and bibliometric-based review in the applications of machine learning (ML) techniques for sustainable manufacturing (SM). In the present study, we use a bibliometric review approach that is focused on the statistical analysis of published scientific documents with an unbiased objective of the current status and future research potential of ML applications in sustainable manufacturing. The present study highlights how manufacturing industries can benefit from ML techniques when applied to address SM issues. Based on the findings, a ML-SM framework is proposed. The framework will be helpful to researchers, policymakers and practitioners to provide guidelines on the successful management of SM practices. A comprehensive and bibliometric review of opportunities for ML techniques in SM with a framework is still limited in the available literature. This study addresses the bibliometric analysis of ML applications in SM, which further adds to the originality
    • Machine-learning-based side-channel evaluation of elliptic-curve cryptographic FPGA processor.

      Mukhtar, Naila; Mehrabi, Mohamad; Kong, Yinan; Anjum, Ashiq; University of Derby; Macquarie University (MDPI, 2018-12-25)
      Security of embedded systems is the need of the hour. A mathematically secure algorithm runs on a cryptographic chip on these systems, but secret private data can be at risk due to side-channel leakage information. This research focuses on retrieving secret-key information, by performing machine-learning-based analysis on leaked power-consumption signals, from Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) implementation of the elliptic-curve algorithm captured from a Kintex-7 FPGA chip while the elliptic-curve cryptography (ECC) algorithm is running on it. This paper formalizes the methodology for preparing an input dataset for further analysis using machine-learning-based techniques to classify the secret-key bits. Research results reveal how pre-processing filters improve the classification accuracy in certain cases, and show how various signal properties can provide accurate secret classification with a smaller feature dataset. The results further show the parameter tuning and the amount of time required for building the machine-learning models
    • Macroeconomic rationality and Lucas’ misperceptions model: further evidence from 41 countries.

      Apergis, Nicholas; Miller, Stephen; University of Macedonia; University of Nevada Las Vegas (Elsevier, 2004-03-27)
      Several researchers have examined Lucas’ misperceptions model as well as various propositions derived from it within a cross-section empirical framework. The cross-section approach imposes a single monetary policy regime for the entire period. Our paper innovates on existing tests of those rational expectations propositions by allowing the simultaneous effect of monetary and short-run aggregate supply (oil price) shocks on output behavior and the employment of advanced panel econometric techniques. Our empirical findings, for a sample of 41 countries over 1949–1999, provide evidence in favor of the majority of rational expectations propositions.
    • Madagascar's escape from Africa: A high-resolution plate reconstruction for the Western Somali Basin and implications for supercontinent dispersal

      Phethean, Jordan; Kalnins, Lara M.; van Hunen, Jeroen; Biffi, Paolo G.; Davies, Richard J.; McCaffrey, Ken J.W.; Durham University; University of Edinburgh; S.G.E.G ENI, Milan, Italy; Newcastle University (American Geophysical Union (AGU), 2016-12-29)
      Accurate reconstructions of the dispersal of supercontinent blocks are essential for testing continental breakup models. Here, we provide a new plate tectonic reconstruction of the opening of the Western Somali Basin during the breakup of East and West Gondwana. The model is constrained by a new comprehensive set of spreading lineaments, detected in this heavily sedimented basin using a novel technique based on directional derivatives of free‐air gravity anomalies. Vertical gravity gradient and free‐air gravity anomaly maps also enable the detection of extinct mid‐ocean ridge segments, which can be directly compared to several previous ocean magnetic anomaly interpretations of the Western Somali Basin. The best matching interpretations have basin symmetry around the M0 anomaly; these are then used to temporally constrain our plate tectonic reconstruction. The reconstruction supports a tight fit for Gondwana fragments prior to breakup, and predicts that the continent‐ocean transform margin lies along the Rovuma Basin, not along the Davie Fracture Zone (DFZ) as commonly thought. According to our reconstruction, the DFZ represents a major ocean‐ocean fracture zone formed by the coalescence of several smaller fracture zones during evolving plate motions as Madagascar drifted southwards, and offshore Tanzania is an obliquely rifted, rather than transform, margin. New seismic reflection evidence for oceanic crust inboard of the DFZ strongly supports these conclusions. Our results provide important new constraints on the still enigmatic driving mechanism of continental rifting, the nature of the lithosphere in the Western Somali Basin, and its resource potential.
    • The magic of the mundane: the vulnerable web of connections between urban nature and wellbeing

      Dobson, Julian; Brindley, Paul; Birch, Jo; Henneberry, John; McEwan, Kirsten; Mears, Meagan; Richardson, Miles; Sheffield Hallam University; University of Sheffield; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2020-10-23)
      Cities are sites of human, ecological and institutional stress. The elements that make up the city – its people, landscapes and processes – are engaged in constant assemblage and disassembly, joining and pulling apart. Reporting the findings of a three-year multi-disciplinary deep case study, this paper examines the role of urban nature in mediating the relationship between stressed humans and stressed places. It applies assemblage theory to show how such relationships can be understood in contexts of multiple pressures. From empirical findings it shows how urban nature contributes to mental wellbeing, but also how institutional stresses linked to austerity policies shape efforts to reconnect humans and nature. Across five strands of research, this article foregrounds the importance of multiple everyday experiences of urban nature and practices of care and maintenance. It calls on researchers, policymakers, planners and practitioners to pay closer attention to the ‘magic of the mundane’ in supporting human wellbeing; in caring for spaces and places; and in providing the services that link people and the natural environment.
    • Maintaining natural spawning timing in Acropora corals following long distance inter-continental transportation.

      Craggs, Jamie; Guest, James R.; Brett, Aaron; Davis, Michelle; Sweet, Michael J.; University of Derby; Horniman Museum and Gardens; Newcastle University; SECORE Internationa; S.E.A Aquarium (European Association of Zoos and Aquaria, 2018-04-30)
      The majority of research focusing on coral reproductive biology (e.g. spawning timing and synchrony) is carried out in facilities adjacent to reefs that the corals originated from. This is in part because transporting corals for long distances by air leads to sub-lethal stress that may confound the results of any experimental study. However, these constraints often mean research associated with coral reproductive timing is restricted to relatively few locations. To assess the potential for studying environmental drivers of spawning timing in corals in captivity (defined here as ex situ closed aquaria), we aimed to transport 14 large (16-37 cm) Acropora hyacinthus colonies from reefs in Singapore to a closed aquarium system in London (a journey time of ~34 hours). Collection was purposefully timed to occur just before the predicted annual mass spawning event and on the day of transportation it was noted that 12 of the 14 corals contained large visible oocytes. The ‘inverted submersion method’ was applied and the water used for transport was buffered to ensure the colonies remained healthy throughout their travel time. At the end location all colonies were placed into a purpose built aquarium research system which allowed for the approximation of the environmental conditions found on the fringing reefs south of Singapore (the original location). While three colonies appeared partially bleached (visibly pale) and one colony suffered from partial tissue loss, all colonies (i.e. 100% of those collected) were still alive at the time of writing (28 months post collection). More importantly, all corals that were gravid at the time of collection spawned ex situ within the same lunar month as those in the wild (within 3-4 nights of each other). This paper describes the procedures for carrying out long distance transportation of large gravid broadcast spawning coral colonies from reef sites to public aquariums or research facilities around the world for the purpose of ex situ spawning research.
    • Maintaining natural spawning timing in Acropora corals following long distance inter-continental transportation.

      Craggs, Jamie; Guest, James R.; Brett, Aaron; Davis, Michelle; Sweet, Michael J.; University of Derby; Horniman Museum and Gardens; Newcastle University; SECORE International, Inc.; Resorts World Sentosa (European Association of Zoos and Aquaria, 2018-04-29)
      The majority of research focusing on coral reproductive biology (e.g. spawning timing and synchrony) is carried out in facilities adjacent to reefs that the corals originated from. This is in part because transporting corals for long distances by air leads to sub-lethal stress that may confound the results of any experimental study. However, these constraints often mean research associated with coral reproductive timing is restricted to relatively few locations. To assess the potential for studying environmental drivers of spawning timing in corals in captivity (defined here as ex situ closed aquaria), we aimed to transport 14 large (16-37 cm) Acropora hyacinthus colonies from reefs in Singapore to a closed aquarium system in London (a journey time of ~34 hours). Collection was purposefully timed to occur just before the predicted annual mass spawning event and on the day of transportation it was noted that 12 of the 14 corals contained large visible oocytes. The ‘inverted submersion method’ was applied and the water used for transport was buffered to ensure the colonies remained healthy throughout their travel time. At the end location all colonies were placed into a purpose built aquarium research system which allowed for the approximation of the environmental conditions found on the fringing reefs south of Singapore (the original location). While three colonies appeared partially bleached (visibly pale) and one colony suffered from partial tissue loss, all colonies (i.e. 100% of those collected) were still alive at the time of writing (28 months post collection). More importantly, all corals that were gravid at the time of collection spawned ex situ within the same lunar month as those in the wild (within 3-4 nights of each other). This paper describes the procedures for carrying out long distance transportation of large gravid broadcast spawning coral colonies from reef sites to public aquariums or research facilities around the world for the purpose of ex situ spawning research.
    • Major events programming in a city: Comparing three approaches to portfolio design.

      Antchak, Vladimir; Pernecky, Tomas; University of Derby; Auckland University of Technology (Cognizant Communication Corporation, 2017-11-08)
      Event portfolio design is increasingly important from both academic and industry perspectives. The purpose of this article is to discuss and conceptualize the strategic process of event portfolio planning and development in different urban contexts in New Zealand. A qualitative multiple case study was conducted in three cities: Auckland, Wellington, and Dunedin. Primary data were collected by interviewing city event planners from city councils and relevant council controlled organizations. Secondary data were obtained by the analysis of the relevant documents, including city event policies and strategies, annual reports, statements, and activity plans. Thematic analysis revealed the existence of distinctive portfolio approaches in the studied cases, which can be compared and differentiated by applying the following parameters: Formality, Intentionality, Directionality, and Rhythmicity. Together, these parameters represent a "built-in equalizer" that can be used to balance the opposing values of diverse approaches and adjust them within current city objectives. The article provides a rich and broad context, which enables an understanding of the strategic nature of event portfolios and their implementation within a wider city development agenda.
    • Major evolutionary transitions of life, metabolic scaling and the number and size of mitochondria and chloroplasts.

      Okie, J.; Smith, V.; Martin-Cereceda, M; University of Kansas, USA; University of Madrid, Spain; Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA (The Royal Society Publishing, 2016-05-25)
      We investigate the effects of trophic lifestyle and two types of major evolutionary transitions in individuality—the endosymbiotic acquisition of organelles and development of multicellularity—on organellar and cellular metabolism and allometry. We develop a quantitative framework linking the size and metabolic scaling of eukaryotic cells to the abundance, size and metabolic scaling of mitochondria and chloroplasts and analyse a newly compiled, unprecedented database representing unicellular and multicellular cells covering diverse phyla and tissues. Irrespective of cellularity, numbers and total volumes of mitochondria scale linearly with cell volume, whereas chloroplasts scale sublinearly and sizes of both organelles remain largely invariant with cell size. Our framework allows us to estimate the metabolic scaling exponents of organelles and cells. Photoautotrophic cells and organelles exhibit photosynthetic scaling exponents always less than one, whereas chemoheterotrophic cells and organelles have steeper respiratory scaling exponents close to one. Multicellularity has no discernible effect on the metabolic scaling of organelles and cells. In contrast, trophic lifestyle has a profound and uniform effect, and our results suggest that endosymbiosis fundamentally altered the metabolic scaling of free-living bacterial ancestors of mitochondria and chloroplasts, from steep ancestral scaling to a shallower scaling in their endosymbiotic descendants.
    • Making a little difference for early childhood studies students

      Oates, Ruby; Sanders, Andrew; Hey, Christine; White, Jon; Wood, Val; Yates, Ellen; University of Derby (Routledge, 2009)
    • Making a rock

      Locke, Caroline; Swann, Debra; University of Derby; The Academy in Antwerp; Nottingham Trent University (N/A, 16/03/2016)
      This collaborative project with Caroline Locke and Debra Swann was developed through a series of residencies at Primary, Nottingham and Summer Lodge at Nottingham Trent University 2016. The first exhibition at The Collectiv National Gallery, Antwerp, Belgium in 2016 and then developed further as part of an exhibition at Primary, Nottingham 2017. Making a Rock is an ongoing durational performance that attends to the physical construction of a large-scale object (a cardboard ‘rock’) embracing the potential of duration, temporality, liveness and performativity. Using photography, video and sound to document this process of making, the enquiry expands the vocabulary of sculptural practice through the focus of the durational aspects of making and the idea of the sculptural work in flux. This enquiry explores the process of making and collecting data. It investigates how we understand objects and sound and the properties and qualities they possess. Through the artist/object relationship a focus on the evolution of an object and the artist’s process is examined. Rock Music is a composition created using sounds taken from recordings of the artist Debra Swann making a huge cardboard rock. The artists have explored the different kinds of data gathered from their combined artistic practices. They extract the data and rework it in live performances and exhibited works. Rock Music explores sound in relation to domestic and labour intensive activity. The composition is cut onto a vinyl record which is played over and over within the exhibition space. The sound of the activity becomes abstract and otherworldly when amplified. Mundane working involves repetition – a strange rhythm develops – a kind of chant.
    • Making meaning and meaning making: memory, postmemory and narrative in Holocaust literature

      Flower, Annie; University of Derby (2013)
      This paper explores links between narration and memory in Holocaust literature and examines ways in which individuals construct memory and postmemory. Based on the premise that ‘All authors mediate reality through their writing...’ and taking into consideration that what we remember and how we remember is likely to have a significant impact on the narratives that we construct, this article considers the reliability of memory. It argues that whilst there is, at times, a blurring of boundaries between fact and fiction in Holocaust literature, this has little or no impact on the validity and authenticity of the narratives. In an attempt to address these issues more fully, this paper explores the notions of making meaning and meaning making, whilst considering the effects of positionality, time and trauma on memory. Key texts referred to in this discussion include Night (1958) by Elie Wiesel, All Rivers Run to the Sea (1996) by Elie Wiesel, In My Brother’s Shadow (2005) by Uwe Timm and The Dark Room (2001) by Rachel Seiffert. These texts have been chosen in order to highlight the subjectivity of memory and postmemory and to demonstrate the role that narrative plays in their construction and representation.
    • Making projects sing: a musical perspective of project management

      Wilson, Chris; Sivaraman, R; Brown, Michael; McCormack, Danny; Business Expert Press (Business Expert Press, 2016)
      This book explores project management (PM) from a musical perspective. Seeking ways of understanding PM in musical ways, distinctive approaches to the management of risk, experimentation, the conception and practice of teams, and the realization of imagination, are explored to highlight both the synergies and distinctions between musical practice and project management in the wider corporate and industrial sectors. The intention being to surface insights of value, capable of adaptation and practical application in a range of contexts, a series of conceptual models and thinking exercises are presented, each designed to structure a more musical approach to project management and capable of application at every scale of project management, and every possible project management environment. The contention of this book is that music provides an interesting context through which to consider project management practice, and therefore a unique opportunity to approach project management from both a different viewpoint and a different mindset. Music is a vibrant field of activity incorporating distinctive approaches to the development and maintenance of expertise, the transfer of knowledge, and the realization of remarkable cultural creativity. Synergies between musical practice and the wider project management profession are many and varied, and more musical approaches to project management may not only be possible, but may also be an engaging means of developing creativity in project outcomes.
    • Making sense of complexity: A qualitative investigation into forensic learning disability nurses’ interpretation of the contribution of personal history to offending behaviour

      Lovell, Andrew; Skellern, Joanne; University of Chester; University of Derby (Wiley, 2020-04-01)
      There is growing recognition that an individual's personal history can be extremely influential in shaping their future experience, though there has been a limited exploration in the context of learning disability and offending behaviour. Research questions related to participant interpretation of offending behaviour and individual and service responses. A series of focus groups comprising learning disability forensic nurses were conducted across all secure settings, high, medium and low. Three themes were produced: interpreting offending behaviour; the impact of personal history; responding therapeutically. The difficulties relating to understanding the relationship between offending behaviour and personal history significantly informed the construction of the most effective therapeutic relationships. An increased focus on the impact of someone's background might inform nursing as it seeks to deliver care to individuals with increasingly complex needs in a time of service transition.
    • Making shaking shifting pouring sawing

      Locke, Caroline; Swann, Debra; University of Derby; Nottingham Trent University; Collectiv National Gallery, Antwerp; The Royal Academy of Fine Arts Antwerp (Primary Studios Nottingham, 2017-02)
      Making Shaking Shifting Pouring Sawing is an installation, exhibition and live Performance. The work explores the idea of repeated and intensive labour and the data gathered in relation to artistic and domestic processes. The exhibits and performances feature made and found objects and the data collected in relation to repeated activities whilst making or working with the objects. The data is retrieved as sound, physical data, digital imagery and animation. These elements are exposed as part of live performances and exhibited kinetic sculptures and devices. The project involved collaborative research explored by Caroline Locke and Debra Swann and was initially developed through a series of residencies at Primary, Nottingham and Summer lodge at Nottingham Trent University 2016. The first exhibition was in Antwerp, Belgium, at Collectiv National, Antwerp Gallery in 2016 (Collectiv National, was founded by Janna Beck and is linked to The Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, Belgium). An exhibition and live performance at Primary, Nottingham followed in 2017. As an extension of Locke’s residency at Nottingham University, based across the Mixed Reality Lab and Horizon Digital Economy Institute, Locke and Swann worked with Assistant Professor Max Wilson and Horia Maior, who equipped Debra with a brain scanning device known as Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) in order to record mental workload levels during her creative making processes. Visualisations of the recorded brain data were projected as part of a live performance and exhibition. The brain data was also used to control various devices as part of the exhibition. For example: a motor uses the rate of brain activity to speed up and slow down a record deck. Rock Music is a composition created using sounds taken from recordings of the artist Debra Swann making a huge cardboard rock. The ‘music’ was cut onto a vinyl disc and played on the brain data controlled device. Rock Music explores sound in relation to domestic and labour intensive activity – The brain effort during the making activity controls the speed at which the record plays during the performances and exhibitions. Shaking Shelves is a kinetic sculpture which is also part of the live performance and exhibition. The brain effort during a cleaning and sweeping process controls the speed at which the motor attached to a shelving unit spins. The shelves are loaded with domestic items and the vibration and movement of the motor causes the shelves to vibrate and the items to shake and sometimes fall. The extended Performing Data research is funded by the Arts Council and explores ideas around body rhythms and physical data in connection with labour, multi-tasking and women's work. Locke is interested in capturing data and using it to control kinetic sculptures within an immersive environment.
    • Making the link between critical appraisal, thinking and analysis

      Whiffin, Charlotte Jane; Hasselder, Alison; University of Derby; University of Suffolk (Mark Allen Group, 2013-09-27)
      Nursing has become an all-graduate profession; as such, student nurses must develop their skills of critical analysis. The need to develop critical analytical thinking has been identified as the single most important skill in undergraduate education and reaching the academic requirements of level six study. In degree-level healthcare programmes, students are frequently asked to complete a structured critical appraisal of research. This paper examines how critical appraisal activities can be an opportunity for students to develop transferable critical thinking skills. Critical appraisal teaches objectivity, reflection, logic and discipline, which encourage students to think critically in both theory and practice.