• Gaining more than just vocational skills: Evaluating women learners’ aspirations through the capability approach

      Stuart, Rebecca; University of the Western Cape (Springer International Publishing, 2018-12-12)
      Vocational education and training had been a popular choice for women learners in the English Further Education sector. However, policy makers and policy researchers have characterized these women learners as providing a poor return on investment due to their failure to enter immediate employment. As a result, there have been significant cuts to funding. Such policy processes have not engaged with why these women returned to education and what they stood to gain from participation. This major absence is the focus of this chapter. Framed using a capabilities approach, women learners were asked why they had returned to FE and how they were going to use their knowledge and training. Using capabilities as a lens reveals a nuanced and complex picture of how education helps them to expand their well-being, agency, and freedom achievement.
    • Gaining more than just vocational skills: Evaluating women learners’ aspirations through the capability approach

      Suart, Rebecca; University of Nottingham (Springer, 2018-12-12)
      Vocational education and training had been a popular choice for women learners in the English Further Education sector. However, policy makers and policy researchers have characterized these women learners as providing a poor return on investment due to their failure to enter immediate employment. As a result, there have been significant cuts to funding. Such policy processes have not engaged with why these women returned to education and what they stood to gain from participation. This major absence is the focus of this chapter. Framed using a capabilities approach, women learners were asked why they had returned to FE and how they were going to use their knowledge and training. Using capabilities as a lens reveals a nuanced and complex picture of how education helps them to expand their well-being, agency, and freedom achievement.
    • Gallstone disease.

      Mortimore, Gerri; University of Derby (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), 2015-12)
    • Gallstone disease: diagnosis and management.

      Mortimore, Gerri; University of Derby (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), 2014-10)
    • Galvanic vestibular stimulation produces sensations of rotation consistent with activation of semicircular canal afferents

      Reynolds, Raymond Francis; Osler, Callum J.; University of Birmingham, School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, College of Life and Environmental Sciences (Frontiers, 2012)
    • Gambling over the Internet

      Brindley, Clare; Nottingham Trent University (IGI Global, 2006)
      Gambling providers have begun to exploit the Internet as a vehicle for marketing their products and services. This article discusses the increase in Internet gambling and how the gambling industry has exploited technology to make market gains. Gambling on the Internet is a billion-dollar industry, with online lotteries and pools generating more than half of the total market value (i.e., $1.66 billion). There is a plethora of gambling opportunities, such as casino games and online games, and horse and event betting, although inevitably some of the rules of the games have had to be adapted to operate via the new medium. The home-based nature of interactive gambling means that consumers are no longer restricted by opening hours, social status, or membership requirements, and are able to choose from a wide selection of gambling sites. The nature of the response by gambling organizations to the changes in consumer behavior has depended on the willingness of providers to become online providers, domestic and/or international legislation, and of course Internet service provision, all of which will differ depending on the gambling products offered.
    • Game park tourism.

      Azara, Iride; Wilcockson, Helen; University of Derby; West Notts College (Sage, 2017-07-03)
      The term game park tourism is used to define a range of tourism experiences specifically occurring within the designated boundaries of a game park. These experiences range from nonconsumptive activities, such as wildlife photography, observational activities, arts, and painting, to consumptive practices, such as hunting in game parks, fishing, petting lions, riding elephants, and so on.
    • Gandharva: the magic sound of the Nepali Sarangi

      Nicoletti, Martino; University of Derby, School of Art and Design (Firenze - Bologna: A-Buzz Supreme - Stenopeica, 2013)
      The CD presents a series of sarangi solo executions inspired by a rich repertoire of traditional Nepali and Tibetan melodies, performed by Shyam Nepali: in this work the long-established music of the Gaine of Nepal blends with the very personal experimentation and intimate feelings of one of the most renowned innovative and sensitive musicians in the panorama of contemporary Nepali music. Track 01: Morning bliss Track 02: Himalayan dawn Track 03: Across the clouds Track 04: Waiting Track 05: Footprints in the snow Track 06: Soul’s vibe Track 07: The shaman’s flight Track 08: Melting water Track 09: Beauty revealed Track 10: Don’t turn your gaze behind Track 11: Back from the fields Scientific researches, recording organisation and supervision: Martino Nicoletti; Sound engineering and post-production: Roberto Passuti; Label: Stenopeica – A Buzz Supreme.
    • Gardens and gardening

      Crouch, David; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2009)
      The garden has been an informing metaphor for geographical thought for sometime and as an affective material object and gardening as a process in the figuring and refiguring of space. It has represented an ideal environment and culture, a rather pre-cultural, pre-human state in a number of world religions, and continues to reappear in contemporary geographical discussions of the sacred. These leitmotifs of human geography are significantly theorized through ideology, discourse, and power, where ‘the garden’ becomes iconic. Signifying identity as well as status, cultural capital and social difference, as well as social/cultural relations, the garden and ways of gardening emerge as expression. A more complex conceptualization of the garden and gardening emerge in debates concerning consumption, commodification, and identity. In recent decades, the garden as artifact has been increasingly transformed to gardening as practice and as significant in developing critical conceptual approaches to a range of ‘new’ cultural geographies. These shifts and developments accompany the increasing geographical interest in process, practice, and performance. The ‘nature’ dimensions relating to, and perhaps informed by, gardens and gardening emerge in new ways in terms of the conceptualizations of nature where significance and meaning may emerge through practice, and in relation to the nonhuman; and debates concerning the ethical and moral in human geography, including shifting symbolism of the garden and of gardening in relation to war and peace. These developments in human geographies have been enmeshed with wider humanities and social science thinking and beyond these, from art theory and social anthropology to environmental debate.
    • The GASP Project

      Werner, Duncan; Uiversity of Derby, Creative Technologies Research Group (2014-06)
      Overview of GASP (Guitars with Ambisonic Spatial Production) presentation
    • The GASP project: Guitars with ambisonic spatial production.

      Werner, Duncan; University of Derby (2016)
      The GASP 'Guitars with Ambisonic Spatial Performance’ project seeks to demonstrate alternative ways in which various guitar performance styles can benefit from re-timbralisation and ambisonic spatial production techniques. GASP is an ongoing project where research into guitar performance utilising multiple individually processed string timbres, generated by our multichannel guitars, in conjunction with virtual guitar processing software, and processed ambisonically, provides scope for alternative performance and production techniques; more information on the GASP system at: http://tinyurl.com/GASP-Derby
    • GASP v2: Guitars with Ambisonic Spatial Performance

      Werner, Duncan; Wiggins, Bruce; Box, Charlie; Dallali, Dominic; Hooley, Jack; Middlicott, Charlie; University of Derby: Creative Technologies Research Group; University of Derby: Department of Media and Perfoming Arts (2016-06)
      The 2016 GASP v2 'Guitars with Ambisonic Spatial Performance' project seeks to demonstrate alternative ways in which various guitar performance styles can benefit from re-timbralisation and ambisonic spatial production techniques. This poster was funded through the ‘Undergraduate Research Scholarship Scheme’ (URSS) and presented at the University of Derby Buxton Campus 12th Annual Learning & Teaching conference on Monday 4th July 2016. The poster was also utilised as a contribution to the Creative Technologies Research Group (CTRG) ‘Sounds in Space’ symposium held at the University of Derby on 28th June 2016, at which three pieces of multichannel guitar recordings were demonstrated.
    • GASP: Guitars with ambisonic spatial performance

      Werner, Duncan; Wiggins, Bruce; Lawson, Tom; Weightman, Tom; Callister, Joe; University of Derby: Creative Technologies Research Group (2015-06)
      ‘Guitars with Ambisonic Spatial Performance’ (GASP) is an ongoing project where our expertise in surround sound algorithmic research is combined with off-the-shelf hardware and bespoke software to create a spatial multichannel surround guitar performance system. This poster was funded through the ‘Undergraduate Research Scholarship Scheme’ (URSS) and presented at the University of Derby Buxton Campus 10th Annual Learning & Teaching conference on Wednesday 1st July 2015. The theme being ‘Students as Partners: Linking Teaching, Research and Enterprise’. The poster was also utilised as a contribution to the Creative Technologies Research Group (CTRG) ‘Sounds in Space’ symposium held at the University of Derby in June 2015, at which three pieces of multichannel guitar recordings were demonstrated.
    • Gathering career wisdom from Facebook and other social media

      Hooley, Tristram; University of Derby (CASCAID, Loughborough University, 2011)
      Tristram Hooley (Head of the International Centre for Guidance Studies – www.derby.ac.uk/icegs) discusses why careers professionals and their clients should be interested in social media.
    • The Gatsby benchmarks and social mobility: impacts to date

      Hanson, Jill; Neary, Siobhan; University of Derby (IAEVG, 2020-03)
      Young people face a lengthening transition from education to the world of work. The average age that young people leave full-time education has been rising for over a century. Within the education system they are frequently asked to make choices about subject, institution and qualifications that will exert a profound influence on their future lives. This is an issue for all young people and is particularly concerning because social capital is a significant influence on careers. Some young people can lack the social capital to develop an awareness of careers and labour markets, decision making around careers and progression routes available to them through education and training. They can then be at risk of being outperformed by their more advantaged peers when building their careers. This paper discusses recent developments in policy and career strategy in England for young people and the extent to which career strategy is moving away from being a marginalised policy area. It examines a recent pilot which has operationalised elements of the recent career strategy for young people and an evaluation which explores how career guidance, as an all-inclusive measure, is being used to impact positively on learners in the short, medium and long term.
    • Gatsby careers benchmark north east implementation pilot: interim evaluation (2015-2017)

      Hanson, Jill; Vigurs, Katy; Moore, Nicki; Everitt, Julia; Clark, Lewis; International Centre for Guidance Studies (University of Derby, 2019-02-15)
      This report presents interim evaluation findings on the implementation of the Gatsby Benchmarks (herewith referred to as the Benchmarks) for good career guidance with a sample of 16 pilot schools and colleges (herewith referred to as education providers) in the North East of England. These interim findings report progress made against the Benchmarks during the course of the pilot (autumn 2015 to autumn 2017), the enablers and barriers faced, and the impact of the Benchmarks on learners’ career readiness and attainment. The interim findings suggest the following: Timescale - Schools and colleges involved were able to make significant strides towards fully meeting most, if not all, Benchmarks within two years. To date Benchmark 2 (Learning from career and labour market information) and Benchmark 7 (Encounters with FE and HE) have seen the largest increase in the number of pilot education providers fully achieving them. Benchmark 3 (Addressing the needs of every pupil) and Benchmark 4 (Linking curriculum to careers) have the least number of pilot education providers fully achieving them. Positive impact on learners. Learners show an increase in some aspects of career readiness and tentative increases in some aspects of GCSE attainment. Effective implementation of the Benchmarks. This was enabled by the existence of a regional facilitator to support pilot education providers and strong provider leadership and robust organisational infrastructures. Key barriers were a lack of time and space (in the curriculum), a lack of funding and a lack of commitment at senior leadership level, which impacted on achieving a cultural shift in some education providers. Regional impact. The implementation of the Benchmarks is impacting more widely in the region with non-pilot education providers forming links with pilot providers to seek support on developing good career guidance in their settings. Furthermore, wider stakeholders such as local employers and providers of careers education were also using the Benchmarks to review and develop their services to schools/colleges. Emerging challenges: A noticeable challenge was how the term ‘meaningful’, in relation to encounters with employers and employees, was interpreted and how education providers monitor provision of such encounters.
    • Gay gardens: Visual anachronisms and the subversive politics of lesbian representation

      Marmalade, Gemma; University of Derby (Cambridge Scholars, 2020-12-17)
      This paper is a direct transcription of the performed presentation which was delivered at the conference for the FORMAT19 International Photography Festival, for which I acted as co-organiser and co-editor. This presentation supported my exhibition of the work within the festival. The paper given discusses philosophical issues arising around contemporary representation of lesbian and queer identities in context to its historical counterpart. This paper, like the work itself, continues to playfully and precariously position the work in-between the fictional and documentary, challenging the sensibilities of its audience. Additionally, through the performance of the paper, other research concerns of the subversive nature of this practice were transposed. The paper was presented by a carefully rehearsed imposter version of my academic self. I became my own anonymous audience heckler, undermining the validity of the claims in the research, resulting in my/their dramatic removal from the premises. This work sought to test the expectations of conference conventions, the shutting down of institutional challenge and debate, the erasure of the female voice, the imposter sensibilities of academics, and the inversion of authoritative roles. The work was live streamed along with other conference proceedings and documented through photographs as illustrated within the chapter.
    • Gdansk: national identity in the Polish German Borderlands

      Tighe, Carl; University of Derby (Pluto Press, 1989)
      A study of National Identity in the Polish-German Borderlands
    • The gender and age profile of the house building sector

      Shepherd, Claire; University of Derby (NHBC Foundation, 2017-02-06)
      The UK house-building industry is being challenged to deliver a increasing number of new homes. However, it is also facing skills shortages among its workforce, as older workers leave the industry but are not replaced by new entrants. This report aims to establish the diversity of the house-building industry in terms of the age and gender profile of the workforce and is over-reliant on older workers. Women are engaged in house building, but in relatively small numbers and predominantly in office-based roles. The industry is taking steps to tackle the growing skills shortages, but more needs to be done. This report summarizes the actions that have been taken so far, and identifies opportunities for further progress on increasing the diversity of the workforce in the future.
    • Gender and bank lending after the global financial crisis: are women entrepreneurs safer bets?

      Cowling, Marc; Marlow, Susan; Liu, Weixi; University of Derby; University of Bath (Springer, 2019-04-13)
      Using gender as a theoretical framework, we analyse the dynamics of bank lending to small- and medium-sized enterprises (SME) in the aftermath of the 2008 global financial crisis. Using six waves of the SME Finance Monitor survey, we apply a formal Oaxaca–Blinder decomposition to test whether gender impacts upon the supply and demand for debt finance by women. Reflecting established evidence, we found women had a lower demand for bank loans; contradicting accepted wisdom however, we found that women who did apply were more likely to be successful. We argue that feminised risk aversion might inform more conservative applications during a period of financial uncertainty which may be beneficial for women in terms of gaining loans. However, we also uncover more subtle evidence suggesting that bank decisions may differ for women who may be unfairly treated in terms of collateral but regarded more positively when holding large cash balances.