• Fabric dyeing and printing

      Wells, Kate (Conran Octopus Limited, 2000)
      Fabric Dyeing and Printing guides the reader through the choice of fabric types, the range of dye recipes and the profusion of traditional and new techniques. Exploring the patterning options with the help of detailed step-by-step photography, this book enables the reader to choose and work through any one of the over 30 techniques including: Preparing natural dyes; to printing with foils; hand-block printing to screen printing and the use of resist techniques. In addition, the work of contemporary designers such as Georgina von Eztdorf, Timney Fowler, Cressida Bell, and Janet Stoyle, is highlighted to demonstrate how techniques can be combined and interpreted.
    • Fabrica-tactilis, skilful production, structure - Fabric that may be touched, tangible

      Wells, Kate; Poundall, Robyn; University of Derby; David Nieper Ltd. (26/11/2014)
      Over the last 15 years, many of the tactile and haptic qualities of printed textiles have been abandoned for what is considered a fast and smooth digital solution through the increased popularity in using digital media as a the main source for design inspiration, conception and manufacture. Much of the creativity and qualities produced by hand processes and non digital techniques that in past produced tactile surfaces within a material via the creation of different densities or composite multiple layered structures, have in many cases been replaced with optical digital illusions of texture with the actual tactility of the material being lost or compromised. This paper outlines current collaborative design research that explores the uniting of haptic processes within cross-disciplinary fields of textiles, ceramics and glass. The results are the creation of a variety of materials both soft and hard. 3D-Soft is the result of natural and man-made manipulated fabrics that exhibit three-dimensional textured, puckered, distorted and translucent/transparent effects. That with further cross-disciplinary experimentation, the tactile textural qualities of fabric are transposed into hard surfaces: 3D-Hard, through different stiffening, ceramic and glass processes. The main aim of the research being the creation of unique exciting materials ‘Fabrica-Tactilis’ that develop and unite haptic skills with touch, exploring contradiction and harmony by embracing both traditional and non-traditional textile processes and alternative craft techniques for example ceramics and glass within their manufacture.
    • Facial expressions depicting compassionate and critical emotions: the development and validation of a new emotional face stimulus set

      McEwan, Kirsten; Gilbert, Paul; Dandeneau, Stephane; Lipka, Sigrid; Maratos, Frances A.; Paterson, Kevin B.; Baldwin, Mark; University of Derby (2014-02-19)
      Attachment with altruistic others requires the ability to appropriately process affiliative and kind facial cues. Yet there is no stimulus set available to investigate such processes. Here, we developed a stimulus set depicting compassionate and critical facial expressions, and validated its effectiveness using well-established visual-probe methodology. In Study 1, 62 participants rated photographs of actors displaying compassionate/kind and critical faces on strength of emotion type. This produced a new stimulus set based on N = 31 actors, whose facial expressions were reliably distinguished as compassionate, critical and neutral. In Study 2, 70 participants completed a visual-probe task measuring attentional orientation to critical and compassionate/kind faces. This revealed that participants lower in self-criticism demonstrated enhanced attention to compassionate/kind faces whereas those higher in self-criticism showed no bias. To sum, the new stimulus set produced interpretable findings using visual-probe methodology and is the first to include higher order, complex positive affect displays.
    • Facile template-free synthesis of hierarchically porous NiO hollow architectures with high-efficiency adsorptive removal of Congo red

      Hu, Hanmei; Deng, Chonghai; Sun, Mei; Zhang, Kehua; Wang, Man; Xu, Jiayi; Le, Huirong; Hefei University; University of Derby (Springer, 2019-06-05)
      Hierarchically porous NiO hollow architectures (HPHAs) were synthesized via a one-pot facile chemical bath deposition method and followed by a calcination process. The crystal structure, component and morphology of the products were characterized by various techniques. The results revealed that hierarchical architectures with hollow interior are composed of mesoporous NiO nanoflakes with thickness of about 8 nm. Interestingly, the as-synthesized NiO HPHAs have the unusual three-ordered porous features including a microscale hollow interior and two mesoscale pores which are attributed to the holes on the surface of nanoflakes with an average diameter of about 3.9 nm and the cavities on the wall of microsphere in the range of 20–40 nm in diameter formed by interconnecting nanoflakes. These comprehensive hierarchically porous structures are beneficial for the adsorption performance towards Congo red in water. The absorptive capacity over NiO HPHAs achieved about 1.8 and 4.0 times as high as that of the precursor β-Ni(OH)2 hollow microspheres (HSs) and the commercial activity carbon (AC) under the same conditions. The studies of adsorption kinetics illustrated that the adsorption behavior perfectly obeyed the pseudo-second-order model and the adsorption isotherm fits the Langmuir adsorption assumption well. The maximum adsorption capacities were calculated to be 490.2 mg g−1 according to the Langmuir equation, which is excellent result compared to NiO absorbents. The high-efficiency adsorption capacities for NiO HPHAs are attributed to the large specific surface area, the synergistic effect of micro-mesoporous structure and the electrostatic interaction of NiO with CR molecules. Additionally, NiO HPHAs can be easily renewed and has good chemical stability, indicating a great promising absorbent in the application for the removal of diazo organics in wastewater.
    • Facilitating soft skill excellence in STEM subjects leads to outstanding achievements

      Self, Richard; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2016-07-06)
      This is the presentation given at the start of a workshop at the University of Derby's annual Learning, Teaching and Assessment conference in July 2016.
    • Facilitating students’ (doctoral) transition to the workplace: A critical review

      Upadhyay, A., Kumar, V., Garza-Reyes, J.A.; University of Derby (Routledge, 2019-05-21)
      The recent ongoing changes to the UK higher education sector have put immense pressure on both academics and students. Where academics are working hard to enhance the quality of the educational product, students, on the other hand, are struggling with the rising tuition fees and the challenging labour market. As a result securing a good job after graduation depends on how a student has managed to excel in gaining experience beyond the classroom and developing key skills through their time at university. This becomes particularly challenging in the current era, where globalisation brings further challenges and opportunities to the university sector, to seize the market advantages for those establishments able to respond in a timely and flexible way with appropriate innovation and internationalisation strategies. Doctoral researchers are an integral part of the student community. Hence it is important that universities assure the successful transition of these doctoral students to their workplace and externally. This study, therefore, attempts to provide a critical review on facilitating the doctoral students’ transition to the workplace through doctoral research positions and the role played by their PhD supervisors. The study methodology uses existing literature and interviews with students and faculty members to draw out experiences and perspectives. The results of this research can be applicable to any higher education institution in the UK and to other countries where the academic system is similar.
    • The factor and conceptual structure of the ‘measuring the quality of prison life’ (MQPL) in Croatian prisons

      Sekol, Ivana; Vidranski, Tihomir; University of Osijek (University of Zagreb, 2017-05)
      Measuring the Quality of Prison Life’ (MQPL) is a widely used 126-item scale designed at the Prison Research Centre, Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge. The scale measures 21 dimensions of prison life, which could be classified into five broad categories: 1) harmony dimensions ; 2) professionalism dimensions ; 3) security dimensions ; 4) conditions and family contact dimensions ; and 5) well-being and development dimensions (Lieblieng, Hulley & Crewe, 2011). This paper aims to assess the structure of the MQPL when applied to Croatian prisons. Four hundred and ninety-three prisoners from 11 Croatian prisons filled in the MQPL. The results demonstrated that virtually all of the 21 original dimensions were reliable in the Croatian sample, providing a good conceptual fit of the scale (i.e. 16 out of the 21 dimensions had Cronbach’s alpha higher than 0.70). The factor structure of the scale differed somewhat from the original scale dimensions, but some factors nevertheless made conceptual sense. It is concluded that the conceptual structure of the MQPL is retained in the sample of Croatian prisoners and that the current translation of the original MQPL scale could be used for future prison research in Croatia
    • Factor and reliability analysis of a brief scale to measure motivation to change lifestyle for dementia risk reduction in the UK: the MOCHAD-10.

      Oliveira, Deborah; Aubeeluck, Aimee; Stupple, Ed; Kim, Sarang; Orrell, Martin; University of Derby; Federal University of Sao Paulo; University of Nottingham; Australian National University; University of Tasmania (BMC (Springer Nature), 2019-05-02)
      Background: Modifying lifestyle risk factors for dementia is a public health priority. Motivation for change is integral to the modification of health-related risk behaviours. This study investigates the psychometric properties of the previously validated tool entitled ‘Motivation to Change Lifestyle and Health Behaviours for Dementia Risk Reduction Scale’ (MCLHB-DRR) for use in the UK. Methods: A sample of 3,948 individuals aged 50 and over completed the 27-item MCLHB-DRR online. The psychometric properties of the scale were explored via Exploratory Principal Axis Factoring (PAF) with Oblimin rotation. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) was used to confirm the factor structure using chi-square (χ2), the goodness-of-fit index (GFI), the comparative fit index (CFI), the root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) and Root Mean Square Residual (RMR) as fit indices to evaluate the model fit. Internal consistency (Cronbach α) was measured for the final scale version. Results: Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) resulted in a parsimonious 10-item, two-factor structure (5 items each, factor loadings > 0.3) that explained 52.83% of total variance. Based on the Pattern Matrix, Factor 1 was labelled “Positive Cues to Action” and Factor 2 was labelled “Negative Cues to Action”. After addressing some errors in covariances, CFA showed a good fit where all fit indices were larger than 0.90 (GFI = 0.968, CFI = 0.938) and smaller than 0.08 (RMSEA = 0.072, RMR = 0.041). The standardized coefficients of Factor 1 and Factor 2 ranged from 0.30 to 0.73 and were all statistically significant (p < 0.001). The final scale showed moderate to high reliability scores (Factor 1 α = 0.809; Factor 2 α = 0.701; Overall α = 0.785). Conclusions: The new MOCHAD-10 (Motivation to Change Behaviour for Dementia Risk Reduction Scale) is a short, reliable and robust two-factor, 10-item clinical tool for use in preventative health care and research to evaluate motivation to change lifestyle for dementia risk reduction.
    • The factor structure of the Forms of Self-Criticising/Attacking & Self-Reassuring Scale in thirteen distinct populations.

      Halamová, Júlia; Kanovský, Martin; Gilbert, Paul; Troop, Nicholas A.; Zuroff, David C.; Hermanto, Nicola; Petrocchi, Nicola; Sommers-Spijkerman, Marion; Kirby, James N.; Shahar, Ben; et al. (Springer, 2018-06-13)
      There is considerable evidence that self-criticism plays a major role in the vulnerability to and recovery from psychopathology. Methods to measure this process, and its change over time, are therefore important for research in psychopathology and well-being. This study examined the factor structure of a widely used measure, the Forms of Self-Criticising/Attacking & Self-Reassuring Scale in thirteen nonclinical samples (N = 7510) from twelve different countries: Australia (N = 319), Canada (N = 383), Switzerland (N = 230), Israel (N = 476), Italy (N = 389), Japan (N = 264), the Netherlands (N = 360), Portugal (N = 764), Slovakia (N = 1326), Taiwan (N = 417), the United Kingdom 1 (N = 1570), the United Kingdom 2 (N = 883), and USA (N = 331). This study used more advanced analyses than prior reports: a bifactor item-response theory model, a two-tier item-response theory model, and a non-parametric item-response theory (Mokken) scale analysis. Although the original three-factor solution for the FSCRS (distinguishing between Inadequate-Self, Hated-Self, and Reassured-Self) had an acceptable fit, two-tier models, with two general factors (Self-criticism and Self-reassurance) demonstrated the best fit across all samples. This study provides preliminary evidence suggesting that this two-factor structure can be used in a range of nonclinical contexts across countries and cultures. Inadequate-Self and Hated-Self might not by distinct factors in nonclinical samples. Future work may benefit from distinguishing between self-correction versus shame-based self-criticism.
    • Factored four way conditional restricted boltzmann machines for activity recognition

      Mocanu, Decebal Constantin; Ammar, Haitham Bou; Lowet, Dietwig; Driessens, Kurt; Liotta, Antonio; Weiss, Gerhard; Tuyls, Karl (Elsevier, 2015)
    • Factors affecting consumers’ purchase intention of eco‐friendly food in China: The evidence from respondents in Beijing

      He, Qile; Duan, Yanqing; Wang, Ruowei; Fu, Zetian; Coventry University; University of Bedfordshire; China Agricultural University, Beijing, China (Wiley, 2019-05-28)
      The purpose aims to examine the key factors influencing Chinese consumer’s purchasing behaviour of eco‐friendly food in China giving its context as an emerging economy and its rapidly rising importance in the world eco‐friendly food market. This paper adopts and extends the Responsible Environmental Behaviour (REB) theory by empirically testing key psychosocial factors influencing the purchase intention of eco‐friendly food and the moderating effects of consumers’ demographic characteristics on the relationship between the key psychosocial factors and the purchase intention. A number of hypotheses are proposed. A questionnaire was designed and distributed via online survey in Beijing, China. A total of 239 valid responses were received. The empirical data were used to test the research hypotheses using the hierarchical multiple regression analysis. The research finds that the personality factors in the REB model (i.e., pro‐environmental attitudes, the internal locus of control and personal responsibly) have significant positive effects on the consumers’ eco‐friendly food purchase intention. Such effect is stable across consumers with different income levels. On the other hand, the knowledge–skill factors in the REB model do not have significant effect on the purchase intention of consumers. This study contributes to a better understanding of factors affecting eco‐friendly food consumption intention in China and the behavioural characteristics of consumers in developing countries. Moreover, the findings also shed light on the applicability of the REB theory in emerging economies and a specific industrial context.
    • Factors affecting hospital staff judgments about sickle cell disease pain

      Elander, James; Marczewska, Malgorzata; Amos, Roger; Thomas, Aldine; Tangayi, Sekayi; University of Derby (2006)
      Judgments about people with pain are influenced by contextual factors that can lead to stigmatization of patients who present in certain ways. Misplaced staff perceptions of addiction may contribute to this, because certain pain behaviors superficially resemble symptoms of analgesic addiction. We used a vignette study to examine hospital staff judgments about patients with genuine symptoms of analgesic addiction and those with pain behaviors that merely resemble those symptoms. Nurses and doctors at hospitals in London, UK, judged the level of pain, the likelihood of addiction, and the analgesic needs of fictitious sickle cell disease patients. The patient descriptions included systematic variations to test the effects of genuine addiction, pain behaviors resembling addiction, and disputes with staff, which all significantly increased estimates of addiction likelihood and significantly decreased estimates of analgesic needs. Participants differentiated genuine addiction from pain behaviors resembling addiction when making judgments about addiction likelihood but not when making judgments about analgesic needs. The treatment by staff of certain pain behaviors as symptoms of analgesic addiction is therefore a likely contributory cause of inadequate or problematic hospital pain management. The findings also show what a complex task it is for hospital staff to make sensitive judgments that incorporate multiple aspects of patients and their pain. There are implications for staff training, patient education, and further research.
    • Factors affecting on student unsuccessfulness in engineering programmes in distance education

      Senanayake, Samans; Liyanage, Kapila; Dadigamuwa, Pushpa Ranjani; The Open University of Sri Lanka (Duquesne University, 2005-06)
      This study was conducted to ascertain the reasons for unsuccessfulness among students enrolling for engineering (technology) study programme in distance learning conducted by the Open University of Sri Lanka. The profile of students, students’ awareness about distance learning methodology, reasons for selecting distance learning courses, students’ appraisal of course delivery, and level of support given by the faculty were studied through a survey conducted among students who follow courses at levels 1 and 2. According to the study, it was revealed that majority of students who passed the G C E (A/L) examination were found to be either willing to continue or undecided whether to abandon or continue studies. Non-familiarity with distance learning method, lack of time, and high course fees were major reasons for deciding to give up the programme. Language difficulty and difficulty in course material were rated below other factors influencing possible student drop outs. Most students (87%) indicated securing employment and gaining knowledge as their reason for selecting the study programme in distance learning. Only a 13% joined because of persuasion by others. As far as course delivery is concerned, 86% of students needed more face-to-face teaching reflecting the fact that they have not made up minds to do self-study which is characteristic of distance learning. Further, 78% stated that even the limited face-to-face classes were not conducted to the satisfaction of students. In conclusion, it was evident that students joined the programme with an understanding of the content of the programme but they seem to find difficulty in coping due to distance learning methods. As far as delivery is concerned there were no major complaints on course material, but a more significant factor was the way faculty, staff and visiting academics conducted limited face-to-face classes. Therefore, making students, as well as all tutors and lectures who undertake to guide the students, thoroughly aware of the distance learning methods at enrolment, is strongly recommended.
    • Factors associated with complementary and alternative medicine use in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A literature review

      Usher, Lee; Fox, Pauline; Lafarge, Caroline; Mitchell, Kathryn; University of West London (PsychOpen, 2013)
      Aim: Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a chronic functional bowel condition, which has substantial impact on quality of life and use of healthcare services. Patients often report using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for symptom management despite limited evidence to support its use. Psychological factors have been shown to be important in both influencing CAM use and as avenues of intervention to assist in managing IBS symptoms. Therefore, this review assessed prevalence of and psychological factors associated with CAM use by people with IBS. Method: Five electronic databases (including AMED, EMBASE and PsychINFO) were searched for studies that examined both the extent of and the reasons for CAM use. Five studies met the inclusion criteria. Results: Prevalence of CAM use ranged from 9% to 38%. CAM use was associated with psychosocial factors, including concerns about conventional medical care (i.e., the perceived harmful effects of medication, perception that conventional medicine had failed, and lack of satisfaction with conventional care) and anxiety. Conclusion: These findings identify psychological factors associated with CAM use which could be targeted through psychologically oriented management strategies for those affected with IBS.
    • Factors associated with the quality of life of family carers of people with dementia: A systematic review

      Farina, Nicolas; Page, Thomas E.; Daley, Stephanie; Brown, Anna; Bowling, Ann; Basset, Thurstine; Livingston, Gill; Knapp, Martin; Murray, Joanna; Banerjee, Sube; et al. (Wiley, 2017-02-03)
      Family carers of people with dementia are their most important support in practical, personal, and economic terms. Carers are vital to maintaining the quality of life (QOL) of people with dementia. This review aims to identify factors related to the QOL of family carers of people with dementia. Searches on terms including “carers,” “dementia,” “family,” and “quality of life” in research databases. Findings were synthesized inductively, grouping factors associated with carer QOL into themes. A total of 909 abstracts were identified. Following screening, lateral searches, and quality appraisal, 41 studies (n = 5539) were included for synthesis. A total of 10 themes were identified: demographics; carer–patient relationship; dementia characteristics; demands of caring; carer health; carer emotional well‐being; support received; carer independence; carer self‐efficacy; and future. The quality and level of evidence supporting each theme varied. We need further research on what factors predict carer QOL in dementia and how to measure it.
    • Factors influencing digital forensic investigations: Empirical evaluation of 12 years of Dubai police cases

      Al Awadhi, Ibtesam; Read, Janet C.; Marrington, Andrew; Franqueira, Virginia N. L.; University of Central Lancashire; Zayed University; University of Derby (Association of Digital Forensics, Security and Law (ADFSL), 2015)
      In Digital Forensics, person-hours spent on investigation is a key factor which needs to be kept to a minimum whilst also paying close attention to the authenticity of the evidence. The literature describes challenges behind increasing person-hours and identifies several factors which contribute to this phenomenon. This paper reviews these factors and demonstrates that they do not wholly account for increases in investigation time. Using real case records from the Dubai Police, an extensive study explains the contribution of other factors to the increase in person-hours. We conclude this work by emphasizing on several factors affecting the person-hours in contrast to what most of the literature in this area proposes.
    • Fairy tales, landscapes and metaphor in supervision: An exploratory study.

      Smith, Margaret E.; Bird, Drew; University of Derby (2013-04-02)
      Objective: Supervision is an important requirement for most health professionals and finding innovative and creative forms of ensuring safe and ethical practice are helpful to practitioners. This paper explores the use of fairy tales, mental landscapes and metaphors to illuminate the therapeutic and supervisory relationship. A therapy case study was used as reference. Design: The design was based on a grounded theory methodology and qualitative‐based collaborative meetings between professionals. Both researchers/participants were from different therapeutic backgrounds; drama therapy and integrative counselling. Findings: Two main themes emerged relating to the therapeutic process: (1) Using Archetypal themes in fairy tales to enhance the clarity of the therapeutic landscape; and (2) The facilitation of the sense system through the use of small objects to reconceptualise the therapeutic dynamic. Conclusion: The use of metaphor and small objects to explore retrospective therapeutic encounters can enhance the role of supervision by broadening the cognitive landscape of the therapist. Implications for the therapist/client and supervisor relationships are considered.
    • Faith in vehicles: A set of evaluation criteria for trust management in vehicular ad-hoc network

      Ahmad, Farhan; Hall, Jordan; Adnane, Asma; Franqueira, Virginia N. L.; University of Derby; Capita Group (IEEE, 2017-06)
      Vehicular Ad-hoc Network (VANET) is a key technology in the domain of transportation which serves as a platform for vehicles to communicate with each other and intelligently exchange critical information, such as collision avoidance messages. Given that potentially life critical information could be exchanged in real time among network entities, it is paramount that this information is authentic (from a legitimate source), reliable and accurate. Moreover, mobility of vehicles creates different contexts in VANET resulting in a diversity of requirements for trust management. This work focuses on the effective modelling and management of trust both as a prerequisite to inter-vehicle communication and as a security measure. To this end, we propose a comprehensive set of criteria which work towards the effective modelling and management of trust in VANET to ensure that the unique characteristics of the network (such as high mobility, dispersion of vehicles, and lack of central architecture) are considered. The contribution of this paper is twofold. (1) We propose 16 criteria for effective trust management in VANET, and (2) evaluate various available trust models based on these proposed criteria.
    • A famework for data sharing between healthcare providers using blockchain

      Alzahrani, Ahmed G.; Alenezi, Ahmed; Atlam, Hany F.; Wills, Gary; University of Southampton (SCITEPRESS - Science and Technology Publications, 2020-05)
      The healthcare data are considered as a highly valuable source of information that can improve healthcare systems to be more intelligent and improve the quality of the provided services. However, due to security and privacy issues, sharing data between healthcare organisations is challenging. This has led to data shortage in the healthcare sector which is considered as a significant issue not only in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) but also worldwide. The primary objective of conducting this paper is to investigate the various factors that enable secure sharing and exchange of healthcare information between different healthcare providers in the KSA. It starts by discussing the current literature and frameworks for managing healthcare data information and the challenges that health providers encounter, particularly when it comes to issues such as data security, patient privacy, and healthcare information exchange. These challenges in managing healthcare data have necessitated the nee d for implementing a solution that can allow medical providers to have access to updated healthcare information. Attention in the healthcare sector has been drawn to blockchain technology as a part of the solution, especially after the technology was successfully applied in the financial sector to improve the security of financial transactions, particularly involving digital currencies such as Bitcoin. Therefore, a framework based on the blockchain technology has been proposed to achieve the goals of the present research.