• The determination of finger flexor critical force in rock climbers

      Giles, David; Chidley, Joel;; Taylor, Nicola; Torr, Ollie; Hadley, Josh; Randall, Tom; Fryer, Simon; University of Derby (Human Kinetics, 2019-04)
      Purpose: To determine if the mathematical model used for the estimation of critical force (CF) and the energy store component W’ is applicable to intermittent isometric muscle actions of the finger flexors of rock climbers, using a multi-session test. As a secondary aim, the agreement of estimates of CF and W’ from a single-session test were also determined. The CF was defined as the slope coefficient and W’ the intercept of the linear relationship between total “isometric work” (Wlim) and time to exhaustion (Tlim). Methods: Subjects performed three (separated by either 20 m or >24 h) tests to failure using intermittent isometric finger flexor contractions at 45, 60 and 80% of their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Results: Force plotted against Tlim displayed a hyperbolic relationship, correlation coefficients of the parameter estimates from the work–time CF model were consistently very high (R2 > 0.94). Climbers mean CF was 425.7 ± 82.8 N (41.0 ± 6.2% MVC) and W’ 30882 ± 11820 N·s. Good agreement was found between the single and multi-session protocol for CF (ICC(3,1) = 0.900, 95% Confidence Interval [CI95%] 0.616 – 0.979), but not for W’ (ICC(3,1) = 0.768, CI95% 0.190 – 0.949). Conclusions: The results demonstrated the sensitivity of a simple test for the determination of CF and W’, using equipment readily available in most climbing gyms. While further work is still necessary, the test of CF described is of value for understanding exercise tolerance and determine optimal training prescription to monitor improvements the performance of the finger flexors.
    • Environmental, social and economic growth indicators spur logistics performance: from the perspective of South Asian Association for regional cooperation countries.

      Khan, Syed Abdul Rehman; Jian, Chen; Zhang, Yu; Golpîra, Hêriş; Kumar, Anil; Sharif, Arshian; School of Economics and Management, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China; School of Economics and Management, Chang'an University, Xi'an, Shaanxi, 710064, China; Department of Industrial Engineering, Sanandaj Branch, Islamic Azad University, Sanandaj, Iran (Elsevier., 2019-03)
      This article examines the association between green logistics operations, social, environmental and economic indicators of SAARC (South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation) countries. The research used GMM (Generalized Method of Moments) and FGLS (Feasible Generalized Least Squares) two methods to tackle the problems of heterogeneity, serial correlation and heteroskedasticity. The findings show that fossil fuel consumption is at the heart of logistics operations; the more fossil fuel and non-green energy resources that are used, the more negative effects on society and environmental sustain-ability result from this. A lower quality of transport-related infrastructure and logistics services is negatively correlated with fossil fuel usage, carbon emissions, health expenditure, greenhouse gas emissions and political instability of SAARC countries. Conversely, efficient customs procedures and greater information sharing among supply chain partners increase trade opportunities and also improve environmental sustainability in terms of minimum carbon emissions due to the shorter waiting and queue times involved. Further, the application of green energy resources and green practices can mitigate negative effects on social and environmental sustainability due to better logistics operations while improving financial performance in terms of higher GDP per capita, trade openness and greater export opportunities around the globe. As there is very limited research using green practices relationship with macro-level indicators in current literature, this research will assist both practitioners and policy makers to understand the roles of green supply chain and green logistics in enhancing environmental sustain-ability, social improvement and economic growth for a better future.
    • Behavioural Digital Forensics Model: Embedding Behavioural Evidence Analysis into the Investigation of Digital Crimes

      Al Mutawa, Noora; Bryce, Joanne; Franqueira, Virginia N.L.; Marrington, Andrew; Read, Janet C.; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2019-03)
      The state-of-the-art and practice show an increased recognition, but limited adoption, of Behavioural Evidence Analysis (BEA) within the Digital Forensics (DF) investigation process. Yet, there is currently no BEA-driven process model and guidelines for DF investigators to follow in order to take advantage of such an approach. This paper proposes the Behavioural Digital Forensics Model to fill this gap. It takes a multidisciplinary approach which incorporates BEA into in-lab investigation of seized devices related to interpersonal cases (i.e., digital crimes involving human interactions between offender(s) and victim(s)). The model was designed based on the application of traditional BEA phases to 35 real cases, and evaluated using 5 real digital crime cases - all from Dubai Police archive. This paper, however, provides details of only one case from this evaluation pool. Compared to the outcome of these cases using a traditional DF investigation process, the new model showed a number of benefits. It allowed a more effective focusing of the investigation, and provided logical directions for identifying the location of further relevant evidence. It also enabled a better understanding and interpretation of victim/offender behaviours (e.g., probable offenders' motivations and modus operandi), which facilitated a more in depth understanding of the dynamics of the specific crime. Finally, in some cases, it enabled the identification of suspect's collaborators, something which was not identified via the traditional investigative process.
    • On some results concerning the polygonal polynomials.

      Andrica, Dorin; Bagdasar, Ovidiu; Babeș-Bolyai University; University of Derby (Technical University of Cluj-Napoca., 2019-02-13)
      In this paper we define the $n$th polygonal polynomial $P_n(z) = (z-1)(z^2-1)\cdots(z^n-1)$ and we investigate recurrence relations and exact integral formulae for the coefficients of $P_n(z)$ and for those of the Mahonian polynomials $Q_n(z)=(z+1)(z^2+z+1)\cdots(z^{n-1}+\cdots+z+1)$. We also explore numerical properties of these coefficients, unraveling new meanings for old sequences and generating novel entries to the Online Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences (OEIS). Some open questions are also formulated.
    • The impact of books on social inclusion and development and well-being among children and young people with severe and profound learning disabilities: recognising the unrecognised cohort

      Robinson, Deborah; Moore, Nicki; Harris, Catherine; University of Derby; Centre for Educational Research and Innovation (Wiley, 2019-02-07)
      This paper presents the findings of an original research project commissioned by BookTrust, a respected UK charity that gifts books to children, young people (CYP) and their families. It explored the impact and modus of pleasurable engagement with books among CYP with severe and profound learning disabilities and applied a critical, phenomenological stance on what it means to read through drawing on 'inclusive literacy' as a conceptual framework. Data was collected from four local areas in England and included 43 CYP aged 4-14. In keeping with a phenomenological stance, it employed interpretivist methods involving 13 deep-level interviews with families to include observations and structured play; 13 observations of CYP sharing books with others in home, play or school settings, and interviews with 27 practitioners working in a range of organisations (e.g. Portage service, advisory teams). Findings were that books had a positive impact on well-being, social inclusion and development. CYP were engaged in enjoying the content of books through personalisation, sensory stimulation, social stimulation and repetition. This affirmed the theoretical and practical approaches espoused by 'inclusive literacy' but made a critical and original contribution to our understanding of the special place that books occupy as ordinary artefacts of literary citizenship among this cohort. The benefits of volitional reading among CYP who do not have learning disabilities are well known but the authors urge publishers and policy makers to recognise CYP with severe and profound learning disabilities as equally important, active consumers of books who have much to gain from reading for pleasure. There is strong evidence of the positive relationship between reading for pleasure and attainment, emotional and economic wellbeing. Reading books for pleasure has strong associations with emotional and personal development including self-understanding. This is shown to be the case across genders and socioeconomic groups but significantly less research has been done on the impact of reading books for pleasure among people with learning disabilities. This paper provides an original account of the impact of pleasurable reading and engagement with books on children and young people (CYP) with severe learning disabilities (SLD) and profound and multiple learning disabilities (PMLD). It demonstrates that responsive adults support pleasurable engagement with books and reading in ways that enable children and young people with reading disabilities to develop sensory, shared focus, communication, social and cultural understanding whilst also providing a basis for shared attention, closeness and wellbeing. Provided is account of the modus of pleasurable reading and engagement with books within the conceptual frame of inclusive literacy and phenomenological conceptions of what it means to read. Effective practices are illustrated and outlined to include recognition of the importance of multi-modal texts, personalisation and intense dyadic interaction. The paper urges policy makers and publishers to recognises CYP with SLD and PMLD as important, active consumers of books, claiming that their relative absence from consideration of positive impacts is a sign of exclusive conceptualisations of what it means to be a literate citizen.
    • Searching for synergies, making majorities: the demands for Pakistan and Maharashtra.

      Godsmark, Oliver; University of Sheffield (Taylor and Francis, 2019-02-03)
      This paper re-examines the Pakistan demand as part of a wider ‘federal moment’ in India, by addressing its connections with the coterminous calls for Samyukta Maharashtra in the context of the Cabinet Mission of spring/summer 1946. It highlights how the twinned processes of democratisation and provincialisation during the interwar years informed these demands. Both Muslim and Maratha representatives looked to locate and secure autonomous political spaces that would better secure their political representation. Their demands exemplified a shift away from a commensurative logic expressed through separate representation in the legislatures, and towards support for majority rule at the provincial level.
    • The mental health needs of child and adolescent refugees and asylum seekers entering Europe.

      Sapthiang, s; Van Gordon, W; Shonin, E; Griffiths, M; University of Derby; University of Essex.; Awake to Wisdom Centre for Meditation and Mindfulness Research, Ragusa, Italy; Nottingham Trent University. (2019-02-01)
      Children and adolescents constitute more than half of the global refugee population, and almost one‑third of first‑time asylum seekers in the European Union (EU) during 2015 were under 18 years of age. Syria, in particular, accounts for a substantial proportion of young refugees and asylum seekers because the ongoing civil war has led to almost 5 million Syrians fleeing their country and becoming refugees during the past 7 years. Being a child or adolescent refugee or asylum seeker carries an increased risk of developing mental illness, and such displaced young people are known to experience problems in accessing health‑care support. The present article draws on examples from Syria in order to (i) Highlight mental health issues that typically arise in children and adolescent refugees and asylum seekers entering Europe and (ii) discuss how changes to health systems and policies in European countries receiving refugees and asylum seekers can be better aligned with global efforts to improve the mental health of young displaced immigrants. In general, research findings indicate that there is a need for better awareness, intra‑agency collaboration, and cultural sensitivity toward the mental health needs of this immigrant population. Furthermore, there is also a need for EU countries to better respond to posttraumatic stress disorder and other typical refugee and asylum seeker mental health problems by more closely aligning national policies with global initiatives to improve the mental health of young displaced immigrants.
    • Innovative approach to sustainable material sourcing and its impact on building performance

      Rajpurohit J.S., Ceranic B., Latham D.; University of Derby (WIT Press, 2019-01-29)
      In this paper, a novel use of building materials and their impact on the building performance and its climatic adaptability is explored, based on a complex case study of a unique low energy sustainable building project. In particular, an innovative use of sycamore and its suitability as a structural and constructional timber has been investigated and reported, given that the current codes of practice deem that is not appropriate for structural applications due to its durability. A research method of in-situ longitudinal study has been adopted, concentrating on the monitoring and assessment of its structural performance and conditions in which it might deteriorate. On the component level, the research reports on the methods and standards of sycamore grading and classification, service classes, resistance to decay, impact of the moisture movement and results of its laboratory and in situ testing. On the system level, the climatic adaptability of the building as a whole has been analysed via dynamic performance simulation and compared to the in-situ measurements. This was important in order to develop a holistic building performance monitoring strategy, but in particular, to understand the impact of building microclimate on the sycamore frame and hempcrete components of the external load-bearing wall. So far research has concluded that sycamore can be used as structural and constructional material in building design, but due attention has to be paid to construction detailing and provision of a breathable, low humidity environment with an effective resistance to decay and insect attack. This includes measures that ensure a low equilibrium moisture content conditions, effective ventilation provision and appropriate service class uses. It is important to state however, given the single site locality of sycamore sourcing, that results can only be interpreted in the context of the given case study, i.e. they cannot be extrapolated to broader geographical extents.
    • Styles of leadership, fears of compassion, and competing to avoid inferiority.

      Basran, Jaskaran; Pires, Claudia; Matos, Marcela; McEwan, Kirsten; Gilbert, Paul; University of Derby; University of Coimbra (Frontiers, 2019-01-22)
      There is general agreement that styles of leadership evolved from mammalian group living strategies that form social ranks. In both non-human primates and humans, different styles of hierarchical dominant-subordinate and leader-follower behavior can be observed. These can be described in terms of dimensions of antisocial (relatively self-focused, aggressive and threat-based) and prosocial (relatively empathic, caring, and supportive) interpersonal styles. The aim of this study was to explore how a set of established self-report questionnaires might relate to these two dimensions. Two hundred and nineteen students completed questionnaires assessing ruthless self-advancement, coalition building, and dominant leadership styles, as well as hypercompetitiveness, narcissism, striving to avoid inferiority, compassion focused and ego focused goals, fears of compassion, social safeness and attachment (in)security. A principal component analysis supported an antisocial leadership style factor which comprised of ruthless self-advancement, narcissism and hypercompetitiveness. This was significantly correlated with fears of compassion, ego focused goals, insecure striving (striving to avoid inferiority), fears of losing out, fears of being overlooked, fears of being rejected, and avoidant relating in close relationships. It was significantly negatively correlated with compassionate goals. As the results did not reveal a clear factor solution for a prosocial leadership style, we chose to use the coalition building leadership style variable. This showed the opposite pattern, being significantly negatively correlated with narcissism, hypercompetitiveness, fears of compassion, fears of active rejection, and avoidance in close relationships. It was significantly positively correlated with secure striving, compassionate goals, and social safeness. We also found that fears of compassion for others was a partial mediator of the relationship between insecure striving with antisocial leadership style. Moreover, lower fears of compassion for the self emerged as a key mediator for the relationship between non-avoidant attachment with coalition building leadership style and, secure non-striving with coalition building leadership style. While the motive to accumulate social power, resources and dominance may be linked to antisocial forms of leadership, the intensity of the drive may also be linked to unaddressed threats and fears of rejection and fears of compassion. Efforts to promote more ethical, moral and prosocial forms of leadership may falter if such fears are left unaddressed.
    • Financial experts on the board: does it matter for the profitability and risk of the u.k. banking industry?

      Apergis, Nicholas; University of Derby (Wiley., 2019-01-13)
      This paper explores the relation between board-level financial expertise, the profitability and the risk profile with panel data from the UK banking industry. The empirical findings document that collectively, financial experts have a positive influence on the performance outcomes of banks, they contribute to higher risks, especially in the case of large banks, while they improve the stock performance of the associated banks. Moreover, the results highlight that board-level qualified accountants have no statistical effect on that profitability, while such a positive link is established for the case of financial and banking professors, as well as for financial experts from other industries. Such findings imply that these two groups of professional financial experts may be easier adopted at group-level profits enhancement. Robustness checks confirm the results for all types of banking institutions, except those with a strong real-estate activity portfolio. Finally, certain commercial and/or policy implications of the results are reported.
    • The impact of fracking activities on Oklahoma’s housing prices: a panel cointegration analysis.

      Apergis, Nicholas; University of Piraeus (Elsevier., 2019-01-08)
      Fracking drilling has opened a discussion on the role of technological developments in economies engaged in shale oil and gas formations. Oil and natural gas production opened new possibilities for employment benefits and housing prices decreases. This paper explores, for the first time, the impact of fracking on housing prices across Oklahoma’s counties, spanning the period 2000-2015. Through panel methods, the findings show a positive effect on housing prices, while this positive effect gains statistical significance only over the period after the 2006 fracking boom. The results survive a robustness check that explicitly considers distance and groundwater-dependency issues.
    • Exorcising an ethnography in limbo.

      Vigurs, Katy; University of Derby (Emerald Group Publishing Limited., 2019-01-07)
      I feel haunted; troubled by the ethnography that I conducted some years ago of a new partnership group that was attempting to set up a community learning centre. I’m aware that it doesn’t sound like a particularly alarming research topic, and perhaps that is where some of the issues began. I did not expect an ethnographic haunting to occur. The partnership recruited me less than a year into the creation of the project and I spent two years as a sort of ‘researcher in residence’. The original idea was that I would observe the initial development of the project and then, when the community learning centre was established, I would research the centre’s activities and how they were experienced by village residents. However, fairly soon into the project, problematic dynamics developed within the group, leading to irreconcilable conflict between members. The community learning centre was never established and I was left to piece together an ethnography of a failed partnership. Researching an increasingly dysfunctional partnership was an emotionally exhausting activity, especially when relationships between members became progressively hostile. Managing data collection and analysis at this time was difficult, but I was shocked that, a number of months (and now years) later, revisiting the data for publication purposes remained uncomfortable. I managed to produce my PhD thesis on the back of this study, but I have not felt able to go back to the data, despite there being findings worthy of publication. This ethnography is in a state of limbo and is at risk of becoming lost forever. In this chapter, I explore the reasons for this and discuss lessons learned for future projects.
    • Executive functioning as a predictive measure of offending behaviour.

      Spenser, Karin A.; Bull, Ray; Betts, Lucy; Winder, Belinda; Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK.; University of Derby, Derby, UK; University of Derby, Derby, UK; Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK; Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK (Emerald Group Publishing Limited., 2019-01-04)
      Prosociality is considered important in the study of offenders and associated cognitive skills: theory of mind, empathic understanding and moral reasoning, are said to enable self-control and reduce the risk of offending behaviours. Previous research has made associations between these skills and executive functioning; however, research into a link between them, in an offending population, is limited. The paper aims to discuss this issue. To further understand the practicalities of this, the present study considered the predictive abilities of the constructs believed to underpin executive functioning: working memory, cognitive flexibility and inhibitory control, in relation to theory of mind, empathic understanding and moral reasoning. In total, 200 male and female offenders completed measures in all six constructs. Using path analysis working memory was demonstrated to be predictive of theory of mind and empathic understanding, cognitive flexibility was found to be predictive of theory of mind, and inhibitory control was found to be predictive of theory of mind, empathic understanding and moral reasoning. The study focussed on offenders serving a custodial sentence of six months or less and did not differentiate between crime categories or take into consideration the socio-environmental backgrounds or ethnicity. Therefore, considering these things could further establish the generalisability of the current findings. It is noted that the more focused the intervention is to the specific needs of an offender, the greater the impact will be. Therefore, pre-screening tests for the constructs discussed may be able to more accurately assess an offenders’ suitability for a programme, or indeed tailor it to meet the specific needs of that person. These findings may enable practitioners to more accurately assess offenders’ suitability for interventions aimed at reducing offending behaviours by improving levels of prosociality and develop more focused programmes to meet the specific needs of individual offenders to reduce re-offending. As recommended in the study, a more tailored approach to offender rehabilitation may be a potential aid to reducing levels of recidivism. The present study adds to the literature as it is the first to consider whether the constructs of executive functioning can predict levels of theory of mind, empathic understanding and moral reasoning and so provide a more accurate method in assessing the cognitive abilities of offenders prior to participation in rehabilitative interventions.
    • Blockchain-Based Distributed Marketplace.

      Kabi, Oliver R.; Franqueira, Virginia N. L.; University of Derby (Springer Nature, 2019-01-03)
      Developments in Blockchain technology have enabled the creation of smart contracts; i.e., self-executing code that is stored and executed on the Blockchain. This has led to the creation of distributed, decentralised applications, along with frameworks for developing and deploying them easily. This paper describes a proof-of-concept system that implements a distributed online marketplace using the Ethereum framework, where buyers and sellers can engage in e-commerce transactions without the need of a large central entity coordinating the process. The performance of the system was measured in terms of cost of use through the concept of ‘gas usage’. It was determined that such costs are significantly less than that of Amazon and eBay for high volume users. The findings generally support the ability to use Ethereum to create a distributed on-chain market, however, there are still areas that require further research and development.
    • A qualitative study on cancer care burden: experiences of Iranian family caregivers.

      Hassankhani, Hadi; Eghtedar, Samereh; Rahmani, Azad; Ebrahimi, Hossein; Whitehead, Bill; Tabriz University, Iran; University of Derby (Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, 2019-01-01)
      The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of Iranian family caregivers with regard to the burden of caregiving. This is in the context of illuminating and identifying the experiences of family members from different contextual perspectives. In this qualitative study, purposive sampling was conducted in 2016. Data were collected using semistructured interviews and were analyzed using content analysis. Data analysis identified 4 categories and 8 subcategories: (1) burnout (physical problems and psychoemotional stress), (2) role conflict (balancing caring roles and family responsibilities; failure in professional or educational roles), (3) health system tensions (inadequate support from health professionals; ignorance of family members in health structure), and (4) social challenges of cancer (economic burden; taboo of cancer). In conclusion, nurses need to provide individualized support and counseling that address the sources of burden. This highlights the benefit of training health care professionals to provide culturally sensitive support based on family caregivers' needs and circumstances.
    • Border field/apparatuses conference brochure.

      McCloskey, Paula; Vardy, Sam; University of Derby; Sheffield Hallam University (Field conditions., 2019-01)
      Through both our trans-disciplinary practice and one specific project based in and across the Irish border with the UK, we discover, occupy and create (alternate) field conditions of various kinds. Our practice,a place of their own,draws together different bodies of knowledge, experience and practice; art, architecture, urbanism, philosophy, fictioning, family to create new imaginaries and cartographies of the border. The Eile Project is a visual art/research project that uses the subjective, spatial and political concept of borders/bordering to respond to some immediate political/environmental challenges, and is sited on the geo-political border between Ireland and the UK. Paula is from Ballyshannon, grew up between Ballyshannon and Enniskillen (as well in England), and has traversed the Irish border across her life. This border condition has renewed prominence within the maligned ‘Brexit’ negotiations. Border field conditions are densely woven with multiple infrastructures, policies, practices and rituals that interconnect in complex configurations; infrastructural systems such as the long- disused Ulster Canal, and the daily practices of local farmers negotiate the border through dynamic interplays of formal procedure and autonomous, creative and resistant practices. The border field condition is partly determined by various technologies and spaces of security and control; of the monitoring and restricting of movement and of various bodies. Yet it is also the site of many existing and potential spatial, social and relational re-imaginings. We will consider the border field conditions as explored through the Eile Project, and specifically discuss the potentialities of these field configurations through the notion of territorial-apparatuses, which might become the starting point for alternative forms of spatial practice. "When apparatuses shift, they can change history across spacetime (quantum erasure). Apparatuses are not only what has been traditionally understood as the mechanical parts of a system of measurement (Barad, 1998, p. 101-2). They include systems of thinking, objects, spatio-temporal properties, people and more-than-people; they are extremely localized. Apparatuses are phenomena."1 The field conditions (both mapped and created) through the Eile Project are therefore those that, by opening to and involving the earth, human and non-human actors, the organic and in- organic, permit new cartographies, territories and modes of collective practice. 1 Whitney Stark, “Assembled BodiesReconfiguring Quantum Identities,” The Minnesota Review 2017, no. 88 (May 1, 2017): 69–82, https://doi.org/10.1215/00265667-3787402.
    • Exploring new voices in applied theatre.

      Jones, Rhiannon; Connelly, Heather; University of Derby (2019-01)
      Exploring New Voices: Future Practice in Applied Theatre Conference. Extend and refresh your practice among a creative community of theatre-makers, academics and world-class practitioners. We’ll be asking questions, addressing challenges, and sharing ideas as we explore how Applied Theatre can bring ‘New Voices’ into our work and revolutionise the way we co-create with diverse communities. Teachers, academics, students, and theatre-makers will all find new ways of developing and exploring their practice. You will exchange invaluable insights with practitioners working in a variety of fields within Applied Theatre, and participate in workshops led by the nation’s leading Applied Theatre specialists, each of whom will guide participants on a different area of practice under the umbrella concept of shared agency with communities. As part of the event InDialogue, (2019) Dr Rhiannon Jones (University of Derby) and Dr Heather Connelly (University of Lincoln) - Co Founders of InDialogue presented their artistic research & collaboration which focuses on the use of dialogue to generate practice across all creative disciplines. They also announced the call for participation for InDialogue 2019; the international symposium hosted by Derby Theatre.
    • Do gold prices respond to real interest rates? Evidence from the Bayesian Markov switching VECM model

      Apergis, Nicholas; Apergis, Hercules; Cooray, Arusha; Khraief, Naceur; University of Piraeu; University of Kent; Sri Lanka Embassy; Université de Tunis (Elsevier, 2019)
      The goal of this paper is to examine the transmission dynamics between the real interest rate and gold prices in the G7. The methodology follows the Bayesian Markov-Switching Vector Error-Correction (MS-VECM) model, along with regime-dependent impulse response functions, spanning the period 1975 to 2016. The findings suggest a positive association between gold prices and real interest rates, with the estimates remaining consistently positive and statistically significant across all G7 countries. The results indicate that gold prices can provide hedging services against real interest rate movements mainly during recessionary times. Our results continue to be robust when we extend the bivariate version of our modeling approach to include more drivers for gold prices.
    • On the notion of mathematical genius: rhetoric and reality.

      Larcombe, Peter J.; University of Derby (Palestine Polytechnic University, 2019)
      The existential hypothesis of mathematical ‘genius’ rests irrefutably with the affirmative. We can’t all be one of course—that sublime solopreneur in creativity—but we may still contribute to research as lesser mortals. This short essay attempts to explore what the notion means to both us and non-mathematicians.
    • On generalised multi-index non-linear recursion identities for terms of the Horadam sequence.

      Larcombe, Peter J.; Fennessey, Eric J.; University of Derby (Palestine Polytechnic University, 2019)
      We state and prove a non-linear recurrence identity for terms of the so called Horadamsequence,andthenofferitsgeneralisationwhichisavailablefromthesamemethodology. We illustrate how the overarching idea may be used to sequentially produce extended versions, each in turn with an extra level of non-linearity and term index complexity. These identities can all be captured in matrix determinant form.