• The good things in urban nature: A thematic framework for optimising urban planning for nature connectedness

      McEwan, Kirsten; Ferguson, Fiona J.; Richardson, Miles; Cameron, Ross; University of Derby (Elsevier BV, 2020)
      Green interventions which connect people with nature to improve wellbeing are increasingly being applied to tackle the current crisis in mental health. A novel Smartphone app intervention was evaluated amongst adults (n = 228) including (n = 53) adults with common mental health problems, with the aim to improve wellbeing through noticing the good things about urban nature. The app prompted participants once a day over 7 days to write notes about the good things they noticed in urban green spaces. Notes were thematically analysed and ten themes emerged. The three themes with the greatest representation were: i) wonder at encountering wildlife in day-to-day urban settings; ii) appreciation of street trees; and iii) awe at colourful, expansive, dramatic skies and views. Through combining the above themes with the pathways to nature connectedness this paper provides an extended framework of activities to inform activity programming, nature engagement media content, and ‘green health’ interventions. Moreover, the findings have strong implications for optimising city planning, design and management for the wellbeing of both humans and wildlife.
    • Renewable hydrogen anaerobic fermentation technology: problems and potentials

      Komolafe, Abiodun O.; Okere, Uchechukwu V.; University of Derby; Lancaster University; University of Southampton (Elsevier, 2019-08-21)
      Hydrogen technology is essential to the decarbonisation of global economies because it addresses the variability and storage limitation of renewable energy. Several research literatures on hydrogen technology have focused on energy systems with minimum attention given to other fossil fuel driven sectors such as chemical and material production. For effective decarbonisation, the application of hydrogen in global economies must extend beyond the use of energy systems. Renewable hydrogen anaerobic fermentation is a suitable technology for converting the hydrogen substrate into gaseous fuel and precursors for material and green chemical production. The technology leverages on the well-established anaerobic digestion (AD) technology and can be selectively operated for a specific product. Although there are some problems associated with renewable hydrogen anaerobic fermentation, studies show different technological advancements in mitigating these challenges. This review focuses on the technological breakthroughs and limitations associated with renewable hydrogen anaerobic fermentation and provides insights on other products that could be derived from it, especially for a circular economy and the emerging market of green chemicals, sustainable agriculture, and bio-based product development.
    • Multiple geophysical techniques for investigation and monitoring of sobradinho landslide, Brazil

      Hussain, Yawar; Cardenas-Soto, Martin; Martino, Salvatore; Moreira, Cesar; Borges, Welitom; Hamza, Omar; Prado, Renato; Uagoda, Rogerio; Rodríguez-Rebolledo, Juan; Silva, Rafeal; et al. (MDPI AG, 2019-11-26)
      Geophysical methods have a varying degree of potential for detailed characterization of landslides and their dynamics. In this study, the application of four well-established seismic-based geophysical techniques, namely Ambient Noise Interferometry (ANI), Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR), Multi-Channel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) and Nanoseismic Monitoring (NM), were considered to examine their suitability for landslide characterization and monitoring the effect of seasonal variation on slope mass. Furthermore, other methods such as Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and DC Resistivity through Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) were also used for comparison purpose. The advantages and limitations of these multiple techniques were exemplified by a case study conducted on Sobradinho landslide in Brazil. The study revealed that the geophysical characterization of the landslide using traditional techniques (i.e., GPR, ERT and MASW) were successful in (i) the differentiation between landslide debris and other Quaternary deposits, and (ii) the delineation of the landslide sliding surface. However, the innovative seismic based techniques, particularly ambient noise based (HVSR and ANI) and emitted seismic based (NM), were not very effective for the dynamic monitoring of landslide, which might be attributed to the short-time duration of the data acquisition campaigns. The HVSR was also unsuccessful in landslide site characterization i.e., identification of geometry and sliding surface. In particular, there was no clear evidence of the light seasonal variations, which could have been potentially detected from the physical parameters during the (short-time) ambient noise and microseismic acquisition campaigns. Nevertheless, the experienced integration of these geophysical techniques may provide a promising tool for future applications
    • Differential qualitative analysis: a pragmatic qualitative methodology to support personalised healthcare research in heterogenous samples

      Gonot-Schoupinsky, Freda; Garip, Gulcan; University of Derby (Nova Southeastern University, 2019-12-02)
      Differential qualitative analysis (DQA) was developed as a pragmatic qualitative health methodology for the exploration of individual differences, behaviours, and needs within heterogeneous samples. Existing qualitative methodologies tend to emphasise the identification of general principles, an approach that can lead to standardised treatment, care, and medicine. DQA emphasises the identification of individual variation, in order to inform personalised healthcare. DQA comprises an accessible three-stage approach: first individual profiles are explored and differentiated into research-relevant subgroups; then each subgroup is analysed, and findings identified; finally, the data is analysed in its entirety and overall and subgroup findings are presented. DQA was developed as a new qualitative approach to: (1) emphasise the identification of person and patient-centered findings; (2) facilitate the analysis of sample heterogeneity, including variation in responses and intervention outcomes; (3) provide a convenient, pragmatic, systematic, and transparent methodology; (4) bridge the qualitative-quantitative divide with a mutually accessible approach. DQA may be particularly relevant for mixed methods research, early-stage interventions, and research exploring personalised and patient-centred care, and integrative medicine.
    • WikiLiteracy: enhancing students' digital literacy with Wikipedia

      Ball, Caroline; University of Derby (CILIP Information Literacy Group, 2019-12-03)
      In January 2019 the University of Derby delivered its first module entirely dedicated to and structured around editing and writing articles for Wikipedia. The course focused on using Wikipedia as a means to improve students’ skills in writing for public consumption, in addition to enhancing their digital and collaborative skills. Students contributed to 118 articles across a range of topics, which were viewed over 11.2 million times, providing them with a public platform no university assignment could match, and introduced them to the challenges of interaction and engagement in a global editing community. Students’ confidence in their digital capabilities was assessed at the start and end of the module and showed a clear increase in confidence across all categories.
    • The longitudinal association between resting heart rate and psychopathic traits from a normative personality perspective

      Kavish, Nicholas; Bergstrøm, Henriette; Piquero, Alex R.; Farrington, David P.; Boutwell, Brian B.; Sam Houston University; University of Derby; The University of Texas at Dallas; University of Cambridge; University of Mississippi (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2019-10-23)
      A large body of research has accumulated investigating the possibility of an association between resting heart rate and psychopathic traits, with meta-analysis suggesting a modest, negative association. Some recent research suggests that prior findings of an association between heart rate and psychopathy may be influenced by inclusion of antisocial behavior in the assessment of psychopathic traits. The current study explores this possibility in a longitudinal sample of British males by comparing resting heart rate at age 18 to psychopathy assessed from a Five Factor Model perspective and from the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version (PCL:SV) at age 48. Our psychopathic personality scale, created using the Big Five Inventory (BFI), was significantly correlated with the PCL:SV and was most related to the antisocial factor. In correlation analyses, resting heart rate at age 18 was not significantly related to BFI psychopathy, but was positively related to BFI Openness and Conscientiousness, and these associations held up after controlling for childhood SES, BMI at 18, and whether the participant smoked during the age 18 assessment. Additional analyses controlling for smoking status were conducted to address the biasing effect of smoking on heart rate during the age 18 assessment and a significant, albeit weak, negative association between resting heart rate and BFI psychopathy emerged. Future research should replicate these results using other normative personality approaches to assess psychopathic traits.
    • Invoking humanism in modernity: architecture and spectacle in fascist Italy

      Tracada, Eleni; Temple, Nicholas; University of Derby; University of Huddersfield (Routledge, 2019-11-01)
      The influence of Fascism on intellectual, artistic and architectural developments in interwar Italy has been the subject of intense debate. This has given rise to contested views about the combined impact of modernism and historical precedents on Fascist ideology, the arguments often clouded by disputes concerning the patrimony of art in Italy and whether Fascism should cultivate its own distinctive aesthetic. 2 However, many of the leading voices of Italian cultural life during the Fascist regime refused to discriminate between different aesthetic choices, believing that “Italian cultural traditions precluded aesthetic regulation.” 3 The debate becomes most revealing when considered in the context of the origins of Fascism. The eminent Italian philosopher and historian Benedetto Croce believed, for example, that Fascism could be traced back almost exclusively to the futurist movement, both in its artistic aspirations and in political activism … in the resolution to go down to the piazza, to impose one’s own feelings, to shut the mouths of those who are dissenting, to be unafraid of commotions and riots; in the eagerness of the new, in the desire to break every tradition, in the exaltation of youth, which was proper to futurism.” 4
    • A step to clean energy - Sustainability in energy system management in an emerging economy context

      Mangla, Sachin; Luthra, Sunil; Jakhar, Suresh; Gandhi, Sumeet; Muduli, Kamalakanta; Kumar, Anil; Plymouth Business School (PBS), University of Plymouth, Plymouth, PL4 8AA, United Kingdom; Department of Mechanical Engineering, State Institute of Engineering & Technology (Also Known As Government Engineering College), Nilokheri, 132117, Haryana, India; Operations Management Group, Indian Institute of Management, Lucknow, India; Kirloskar Pneumatic Company Ltd, Pune, Maharashtra, 411013, India; et al. (Elsevier, 2019-09-23)
      Due to high consumption of energy, its associated concerns such as energy security and demand, wastage of resources, and material-energy recovery are leading to the importance of sustainable energy system development. This is a high time to assess the sustainability in energy systems for meeting the requirements of energy with an enhanced economic, ecological, and social performance from a nation context. The energy system plays a significant role in deciding the economic progress of emerging economies such as India, China, Brazil, and Africa. In this paper, an original attempt has been made to list and evaluate important indicators for sustainability assessment of energy systems development and management in an emerging economy especially India. Firstly, based on the analysis of the extant literature and then followed by expert opinion, potential key sustainability assessment indicators for energy systems development and management were identified. Further, grey based Decision-Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory technique to understand the causal interactions amongst indicators and segregate them into cause and effect groups, is used. This work can provide useful aids to decision making bodies, sustainability practitioners and business organisations in selective implementation, monitoring and control of sustainable strategies in energy systems development and management and meeting sustainable development goals of clean energy in a nation context.
    • Roles of positive psychology for mental health in UK social work students: self-compassion as a predictor of better mental health

      Kotera, Yasuhiro; Green, Pauline; Sheffield, David; University of Derby (Oxford Academic, 2019-11-29)
      Despite high shame about mental health symptoms among UK social work students, positive psychological approaches to their mental health have not been investigated in depth. Emotional resilience has been a core skill in social work practice, however its relationship with mental health is still unclear. Therefore, the primary purposes of this cross-sectional study were to (i) examine the relationships between mental health and positive psychological constructs, namely resilience, self-compassion, motivation, and engagement, and (ii) determine predictors of mental health in UK social work students. An opportunity sampling of 116 UK social work students (102 females, 14 males; 96 undergraduates, 20 postgraduates) completed five measures about these constructs. Correlation and regression analyses were conducted. Mental health was associated with resilience, self-compassion, and engagement. Self-compassion was a negative predictor, and intrinsic motivation was a positive predictor of mental health symptoms. Resilience did not predict mental health symptoms. The findings highlight the importance of self-compassion to the challenging mental health of UK social work students; they caution against the overuse and misunderstanding of resilience in the social work field.
    • The good things in urban nature: A thematic framework for optimising urban planning for nature connectedness

      McEwan, Kirsten; Ferguson, Fiona J; Richardson, Miles; Cameron, Ross; University of Derby (2019-11-06)
      Green interventions which connect people with nature to improve wellbeing are increasingly being applied to tackle the current crisis in mental health. A novel Smartphone app intervention was evaluated amongst adults (n = 228) including (n = 53) adults with common mental health problems, with the aim to improve wellbeing through noticing the good things about urban nature. The app prompted participants once a day over 7 days to write notes about the good things they noticed in urban green spaces. Notes were thematically analysed and ten themes emerged. The three themes with the greatest representation were: i) wonder at encountering wildlife in day-to-day urban settings; ii) appreciation of street trees; and iii) awe at colourful, expansive, dramatic skies and views. Through combining the above themes with the pathways to nature connectedness this paper provides an extended framework of activities to inform activity programming, nature engagement media content, and ‘green health’ interventions. Moreover, the findings have strong implications for optimising city planning, design and management for the wellbeing of both humans and wildlife.
    • Testing real talk: an adaptable evidence-based communication skills intervention in end of life talk

      Watson, Sharan; Whittaker, Becky; Parry, Ruth; University of Derby; Loughborough University (BMJ Journals, 2019-11-17)
      Background Gaps in practice knowledge exist in initiating and navigating through difficult conversations; these new resources provide impactful, evidenced based learning opportunities in developing competence/confidence in engaging patients in end of life talk. Analysis of filmed data of patient consultations at a UK hospice provides the materials for ‘Real Talk’; a novel and flexible education intervention containing real-life video clips. Communication skills training is more likely to be effective in changing behaviours when it is experiential and interactive, being relevant to trainees’ practice. Aim Real Talk interventions were tested out to determine ongoing development of communication skills training for the health and social care workforce. Experienced palliative care doctors attended a three-day facilitated residential workshop in which they explored the Real Talk. Discussions linked to the evidence of communication strategies, reflective diaries and action planning provided opportunity for linking learning to their clinical and educator roles. 29 experienced palliative care doctors attended the workshop who completed a pre/post questionnaire (adapted from a validated tool) and reflective diaries. Delegates identified the most effective aspects of learning as: experiential small group work relating to Real Talk video clips, critiquing underpinning evidence of how clinicians navigate conversations in end of life care and the opportunity to reflect on learning and application to practice in a safe and stimulating environment Engagement and results of the workshop have provided a foundation on which to build flexible communication skills training beyond the hospice setting, in engaging patients in end of life talk. Providing interactive experiential learning, embedded in the evidence base underpinning Real Talk, is crucial for health and social care professionals to develop skills in communicating with patients facing the end of life. The launch of the online Real Talk resources is now recommending that this adaptable approach be skilfully facilitated in safe environments for enhancing skilled practice in end of life care.
    • Icarus, grannies, black holes and the death of privacy: exploring the use of digital networks for career enactment

      Staunton, Tom; University of Derby (Taylor and Francis, 2019-11-28)
      New perspectives on how digital networks can be understood as an environment for career enactment are explored in this article, in particular, through using critical perspectives on technology, especially in the context of prevailing instrumental perspectives in the majority of the career development literature. Thus, the narratives of people using digital networks for their careers were explored using an Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. The results are captured in three main themes or critical discourses: the speed and scale of digital environments, game-like features of social media interactions and a divide between offline and online worlds. These are presented as sites for critical investigation and are aligned with technological and socio-cultural critical theories.
    • Genetic haemochromatosis: A qualitative exploration of patients' experience of diagnosis in primary care

      Mortimore, Gerri; Woodward, Amelia; University of Derby (Royal College of General Practitioner's Annual Primary Care Conference, 2019-10-24)
      Genetic haemochromatosis (GH) is the most common inherited genetic disorder in Caucasians (Bacon et al. 2011), and commonly affects Northern Europeans, especially those with Celtic or Nordic descent, with a ratio of approximately 1:220 - 250 people (Fitzsimmons et al. 2018; Phatak et al., 2008;). Despite the prevalence of GH only 1:5000 people are diagnosed with it (Haemochromatosis UK [HUK] 2019; British Liver Trust [BLT] 2017). In GH the body absorbs excess iron which can lead to systematic iron overload within the liver and other internal organs such as the pancreas, heart and joints; eventually causing inflammation and tissue damage. Early symptoms are non specific such as fatigue, abdominal and joint pain and as such, may be considered inconsequential by GP’s, resulting in a delay in diagnosis and treatment. To date there has been little research examining patient’s thoughts and experiences of being diagnosed with GH, a disorder which requires life long treatment with venesection, and which may lead to cirrhosis of the liver and increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (Ulvik 2015). Data was collected using semi-structured interviews with a sample of 22 patients with haemochromatosis who responded to a poster advertising the study. The interview covered their experience of diagnosis and treatment and the effect it was having on their lives. Patients had been diagnosed between a year and more than 30 years The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Analysis of the data was conducted using thematic analyis. Many of the patients felt that GPs lacked knowledge of genetic haemochromatosis and talked about how GPs were unable to give them any detailed information about the disease Early detection and treatment for GH depends on increased knowledge of GPs. This qualitative study identified that patients perceive there to be gaps in understanding GH diagnosis and treatment. Ensuring GPs are aware of GH and the strategies for diagnosis could result in improved patient care. These findings indicate that improved education for GPs regarding GH may be beneficial in order to improve patient care for this condition and potentially reduce delays in diagnosis.
    • Calibration approaches for higher order ambisonic microphones

      Middlicott, Charlie; Wiggins, Bruce; University of Derby; Sky Labs (Audio Engineering Society, 2019-10-08)
      Recent years have seen an increase in the capture and production of ambisonic material due to companies such as YouTube and Facebook utilizing ambisonics for spatial audio playback. Consequently, there is now a greater need for affordable high order microphone arrays due to this uptake in technology. This work details the development of a five-channel circular horizontal ambisonic microphone intended as a tool to explore various optimization techniques, focusing on capsule calibration & pre-processing approaches for unmatched capsules.
    • "We've been exploring and adventuring." A investigation into young people's engagement with a semi wild, disused space

      Hallam, Jenny; Gallagher, Laurel; Harvey, Caroline; University of Derby (APA, 2019-10-24)
      This paper uses ethnography to explore young people’s engagement with an intervention run by Feral Spaces which was designed to promote a meaningful connection to a disused space. Over the course of three sessions, each lasting two hours, seven young people aged between 11 and 12 years old took part in a range of den building activities in a semi-wild area which was local to them. The sessions were recorded using audio and video equipment and an inductive thematic analysis informed by a realist framework was used to analyse the naturalistic data collected. The analysis presents four themes - engaging with the environment, developing a sense of awe and wonder, respect and attachment to the space and a sense of belonging which map out the young people’s growing connection to nature evidenced during the intervention. Within each of these themes the young people’s experiences are discussed in relation to theory of biophilia and the pathways to nature model in order to evaluate their relevance for researchers and practitioners who seek to understand children’s connection with nature and promote it. Furthermore, the positive relationships and emotions experienced during the intervention are explored. It is argued that the community-based intervention developed the young people’s understandings of the natural world and their confidence to engage with it in a personally meaningful way. This had positive implications in terms of supporting the young people’s wellbeing.
    • Preparing students to care for patients at the end of life

      Westwood, Stacey; Brown, Michelle; University of Derby (Nursing Times, 2019-10)
      Student nurses complete placements in a variety of clinical settings and it is not possible to predict what situations they may encounter, which makes adequate preparation a challenge. They are likely to encounter death and dying during clinical placements from the very start of their education, without necessarily having adequate preparation for the experience. At the University of Derby, 59 first-year students in adult nursing who had completed their first placement evaluated their preparedness to encounter patients at the end of life. They generally found that they lacked training, support and confidence. This article discusses the results of the study and explores how pre-registration nursing education could be improved in this area.
    • Which behavioural and exercise interventions targeting fatigue show the most promise in multiple sclerosis? A systematic review with narrative synthesis and meta-analysis

      Harrison, Dr Anthony M.; Safari, Dr Reza; Norton, Dr Sam; Marietta L van der Linden, Dr; Picariello, Dr Federica; Thomas, Dr Sarah; White, Dr Claire; Mercer, Tom; Moss-Morris, Rona; University of Derby (Elsevier, 2019-08-28)
      Fatigue is a common and highly debilitating symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS). This meta-analytic systematic review with detailed narrative synthesis examined randomised-controlled (RCTs) and controlled trials of behavioural and exercise interventions targeting fatigue in adults with MS to assess which treatments offer the most promise in reducing fatigue severity/impact. Medline, EMBASE and PsycInfo electronic databases, amongst others, were searched through to August 2018. Thirty-four trials (12 exercise, 16 behavioural and 6 combined; n = 2,434 participants) met inclusion criteria. Data from 31 studies (n = 1,991 participants) contributed to the meta-analysis. Risk of bias (using the Cochrane tool) and study quality (GRADE) were assessed. The pooled (SMD) end-of-treatment effects on self-reported fatigue were: exercise interventions (n = 13) -.84 (95% CI -1.20 to -.47); behavioural interventions (n = 16) -.37 (95% CI -.53 to -.22); combined interventions (n = 5) -.16 (95% CI: -.36 to .04). Heterogeneity was high overall. Study quality was very low for exercise interventions and moderate for behavioural and combined interventions. Considering health care professional time, subgroup results suggest web-based cognitive behavioural therapy for fatigue, balance and/or multicomponent exercise interventions may be the cost-efficient therapies. These need testing in large RCTs with long-term follow-up to help define an implementable fatigue management pathway in MS.
    • Nudge theory: should career development practitioners have a position?

      Moore, Nicki; University of Derby (Career Development Institute, 2019-06-01)
      This article considers the ethical issues of applying nudge theory in the career development sector.
    • Understanding the use of digital technology in the career development sector

      Moore, Nicki; Czerwinska, Karolina; University of Derby (University of Derby, 2019-12-04)
      This research, funded jointly by the UK’s Career Development Institute and the University of Derby, has been conducted at a time of rapid change in the availability and use of digital technologies. A recommendation to develop digital skills to harness technology is not new and was first suggested by The Careers Profession Task Force (2010). This research aims to determine what progress has been made over the last nine years since the recommendation was made and seeks to determine: • How practitioners and managers use digital technology to deliver career development services • The potential for digital technology to deliver career development services; and • The training needs of career development practitioners so that they can use digital technology to deliver services, innovate solutions and solve problems in service delivery. The knowledge developed through this research will be used to develop professional support and training activities and services to organisations and individual career development practitioners. It will also be used by policy makers in the UK and beyond, who are tasked with the development of modern, cost-effective and client appropriate career development services.