Recent Submissions

  • The effect of accounting for biarticularity in hip flexor and hip extensor joint torque representations

    Lewis, Martin; Yeadon, M.R.; King, M.A.; Nottingham Trent University (Elsevier, 2017-10-07)
    Subject-specific torque-driven models have ignored biarticular effects at the hip. The aim of this study was to establish the contribution of monoarticular hip flexors and hip extensors to total hip flexor and total hip extensor joint torques for an individual and to investigate whether torque-driven simulation models should consider incorporating biarticular effects at the hip joint. Maximum voluntary isometric and isovelocity hip flexion and hip extension joint torques were measured for a single participant together with surface electromyography. Single-joint and two-joint representations were fitted to the collected torque data and used to determine the maximum voluntary joint torque capacity. When comparing two-joint and single-joint representations, the single-joint representation had the capacity to produce larger maximum voluntary hip flexion torque (larger by around 9% of maximum torque) and smaller maximum voluntary hip extension torque (smaller by around 33% of maximum torque) with the knee extended. Considering the range of kinematics found for jumping movements, the single-joint hip flexors had the capacity to produce around 10% additional torque, while the single joint hip extensors had about 70% of the capacity of the two-joint representation. Two-joint representations may overcome an over-simplification of single-joint representations by accounting for biarticular effects, while building on the strength of determining subject-specific parameters from measurements on the participant.
  • The effect of visual focus on spatio-temporal and kinematic parameters of treadmill running

    Lucas-Cuevas, Ángel G.; Priego Quesada, Jose I; Gooding, Josh; Lewis, Martin; Encarnación-Martínez, Alberto; Perez-Soriano, Pedro; Nottingham Trent University (Elsevier, 2017-07-15)
    The characteristics of a treadmill and the environment where it is based could influence the user’s gaze and have an effect on their running kinematics and lower limb impacts. The aim of this study was to identify the effect of visual focus on spatio-temporal parameters and lower limb kinematics during treadmill running. Twenty six experienced runners ran at 3.33 m s−1 on a treadmill under two visual conditions, either looking ahead at a wall or looking down at the treadmill visual display. Spatio-temporal parameters, impact accelerations of the head and tibia, and knee and ankle kinematics were measured for the final 15 s of a 90 s bout of running under each condition. At the end of the test, participants reported their preference for the visual conditions assessed. Participants’ stride angle, flight time, knee flexion during the flight phase, and ankle eversion during contact time were increased when runners directed visual focus toward the wall compared to the treadmill display (p < 0.05). Whilst head acceleration was also increased in the wall condition (p < 0.05), the other acceleration parameters were unaffected (p > 0.05). However, the effect size of all biomechanical alterations was small. The Treadmill condition was the preferred condition by the participants (p < 0.001; ESw = 1.0). The results of the current study indicate that runners had a greater mass centre vertical displacement when they ran looking ahead, probably with the aim of compensating for reduced visual feedback, which resulted in larger head accelerations. Greater knee flexion during the flight phase and ankle eversion during the contact time were suggested as compensatory mechanisms for lower limb impacts.
  • Optimisation of a machine learning algorithm in human locomotion using principal component and discriminant function analyses

    Bisele, Maria; Bencsik, Martin; Lewis, Martin; Barnett, Cleveland; Nottingham Trent University (Public Library of Science (PLoS), 2017-09-08)
    Assessment methods in human locomotion often involve the description of normalised graphical profiles and/or the extraction of discrete variables. Whilst useful, these approaches may not represent the full complexity of gait data. Multivariate statistical methods, such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Discriminant Function Analysis (DFA), have been adopted since they have the potential to overcome these data handling issues. The aim of the current study was to develop and optimise a specific machine learning algorithm for processing human locomotion data. Twenty participants ran at a self-selected speed across a 15m runway in barefoot and shod conditions. Ground reaction forces (BW) and kinematics were measured at 1000 Hz and 100 Hz, respectively from which joint angles (°), joint moments (N.m.kg-1) and joint powers (W.kg-1) for the hip, knee and ankle joints were calculated in all three anatomical planes. Using PCA and DFA, power spectra of the kinematic and kinetic variables were used as a training database for the development of a machine learning algorithm. All possible combinations of 10 out of 20 participants were explored to find the iteration of individuals that would optimise the machine learning algorithm. The results showed that the algorithm was able to successfully predict whether a participant ran shod or barefoot in 93.5% of cases. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to optimise the development of a machine learning algorithm.
  • Movement velocity as a measure of exercise intensity in three lower limb exercises.

    Conceição, Filipe; Fernandes, Juvenal; Lewis, Martin; Gonzaléz-Badillo, Juan José; Jimenéz-Reyes, Pedro; Nottingham Trent University (Taylor & Francis, 2015-09-22)
    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between movement velocity and relative load in three lower limbs exercises commonly used to develop strength: leg press, full squat and half squat. The percentage of one repetition maximum (%1RM) has typically been used as the main parameter to control resistance training; however, more recent research has proposed movement velocity as an alternative. Fifteen participants performed a load progression with a range of loads until they reached their 1RM. Maximum instantaneous velocity (Vmax) and mean propulsive velocity (MPV) of the knee extension phase of each exercise were assessed. For all exercises, a strong relationship between Vmax and the %1RM was found: leg press (r2adj = 0.96; 95% CI for slope is [−0.0244, −0.0258], P < 0.0001), full squat (r2adj = 0.94; 95% CI for slope is [−0.0144, −0.0139], P < 0.0001) and half squat (r2adj = 0.97; 95% CI for slope is [−0.0135, −0.00143], P < 0.0001); for MPV, leg press (r2adj = 0.96; 95% CI for slope is [−0.0169, −0.0175], P < 0.0001, full squat (r2adj = 0.95; 95% CI for slope is [−0.0136, −0.0128], P < 0.0001) and half squat (r2adj = 0.96; 95% CI for slope is [−0.0116, 0.0124], P < 0.0001). The 1RM was attained with a MPV and Vmax of 0.21 ± 0.06 m s−1 and 0.63 ± 0.15 m s−1, 0.29 ± 0.05 m s−1 and 0.89 ± 0.17 m s−1, 0.33 ± 0.05 m s−1 and 0.95 ± 0.13 m s−1 for leg press, full squat and half squat, respectively. Results indicate that it is possible to determine an exercise-specific %1RM by measuring movement velocity for that exercise.
  • Numeracy apprehension in young children: Insights from children aged 4-7 years and primary care providers

    Petronzi, Dominic; Staples, Paul; Sheffield, David; Fitton-Wilde, Sandra; University of Derby (2018-08-19)
    The purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of the factors that children perceive as influencing attitudes towards numeracy, and to explore the primary care providers’ observations of children’s attitudes and responses. The participants were children aged 4-7 years, in three primary schools in the United Kingdom, parents and primary teachers. The research suggested negative attitudes toward numeracy develop in early education and are influenced by multiple factors.
  • Remarks on a family of complex polynomials

    Andrica, Dorin; Bagdasar, Ovidiu; University of Derby (University of Belgrade, 2019-10-30)
    Integral formulae for the coefficients of cyclotomic and polygonal polynomials were recently obtained in [2] and [3]. In this paper, we define and study a family of polynomials depending on an integer sequence m1, . . . , mn, . . . , and on a sequence of complex numbers z1, . . . , zn, . . . of modulus one. We investigate some particular instances such as: extended cyclotomic, extended polygonal-type, and multinomial polynomials, for which we obtain formulae for the coefficients. Some novel related integer sequences are also derived.
  • Emerging apprenticeship practitioner roles in England: conceptualising the subaltern educator

    Esmond, Bill; University of Derby (Springer, 2019-10-26)
    TVET educator roles and identities vary internationally, and are subject to repositioning, for example as the relative significance of institutions and the workplace change within national systems. In English apprenticeships, a key position has long been occupied by competence assessors, whose non-teaching role has related uneasily to those of professional educators. Following the introduction of new apprenticeship standards, former assessors are increasingly being allocated training responsibilities, raising issues about the expertise, identities and professional formation both of these emerging practitioners and of vocational educators in general. A qualitative study of assessors who have assumed greater training responsibilities examined these issues through individual and small-group interviews. Participant accounts of diverse and contested practices and environments suggested a need to conceptualise their roles in ways that draw upon but go beyond accounts of professionalism and occupational expertise developed at earlier stages. Drawing on Gramsci, the concept of the subaltern educator is put forward to characterise the complex position of these staff in the current climate of further education, the need for enhanced, rather than diminished, professional formation and wider possibilities for professional enhancement at a time of uncertainty for all vocational educators.
  • Do parents have a right to determine where a child patient dies?

    Cherkassky, Lisa; University of Derby (Trivent Publishing, 2019-08)
    This chapter will explore whether parents have the legal right to take their gravely ill child home to die in peace surrounded by family. Public anger surrounding the recent cases of Charlie Gard and Alfie Evans suggests that it is morally wrong to deprive parents of this final wish when medical treatment is futile and travel abroad for treatment has been ruled out. The judgments of Judge Francis (Gard) and Lady Justice King (Re C) will be examined to reveal the legal avenues available to parents of gravely ill children and whether their final wish to take their child home should be afforded more weight in futile cases.
  • Evaluating the impact of lean practices on environmental performance: evidences from five manufacturing companies

    Dieste, M; Panizzolo, R; Garza-Reyes, J. A.; University of Derby; University of Padova, Italy (Taylor and Francis, 2019-10-29)
    Previous evidence suggests that both lean and green production paradigms are focused on waste reduction and that lean practices help organizations to enhance sustainability objectives, and particularly environmental performance. However, the impact of lean practices on the environment is still unclear. This study therefore aims to analyse the relationship between lean and environmental performance in manufacturing with a strong empirical focus. This research was conducted in two main stages: first, an extensive review of the relevant literature was carried out, followed by a multiple case study analysis conducted in five manufacturing companies. Onsite data were collected from the firms during a five years’ time span of research and developing semi-structured interviews. Furthermore, a cross-case analysis was carried out to map the results. Findings indicate that the environmental performance of the companies analysed is generally enhanced in the long-term after the implementation of lean. Moreover, the results from the multiple case study suggest that the environmental performance of the firms under analysis is mainly improved by using JIT and TQM practices in a lean transformation context. The research findings provide further results remarking the possible negative impact of practices such as Kanban deliveries, 5S and TPM on various environmental performance indicators.
  • English translation and validation of the Ikigai-9 in a UK Sample

    Fido, Dean; Kotera, Yasu; Asano, Kenichi; University of Derby; Mejiro University, Japan (Springer, 2019-10-25)
    The psychological construct of ‘ikigai’ reflects the sense of having a ‘reason for living’ and has been associated with various positive health-related outcomes. This study presents an English translation of the Ikigai-9, empirically explores the manifestation of ikigai in the United Kingdom, and outlines its associations with facets of well-being. Three hundred and forty-nine participants self-reported levels of ikigai as well as state measures of mental well-being, depression, anxiety, and stress. Confirmatory factor analysis did not support the original three-factor model, favouring instead a single-factor solution. Results indicated that above sex and age, ikigai predicted greater scores of mental well-being and lower scores of depression. The Ikigai-9 has high internal reliability and presents a logistically-convenient measure of ikigai for English-speaking populations. However, further validation (e.g., test-retest reliability) is required to develop a better understanding of the potential protective role of ikigai in mental health. Transparency files are available here: [https://osf.io/m4yjw/?view_only=26d526416a1e4746944ebaff64502152].
  • Value chain impacts of EU waste framework directive 2018/851 as a result of reporting substances of very high concern from 2021

    Takhar, Sukhraj; Liyanage, Kapila; College of Engineering and Technology, University of Derby; Assent Compliance, Canada (University of Cambridge, 2019-09-27)
    The EU Waste Framework Directive 2018/851 sets out requirements for producers and importers of products within the EEA, to report data on Substances of Very High Concern (SVHC) content within products into a new central European database to from 5th January 2021. The reporting requirements: (1) support chemical regulations that impose the need on industry to record the use of hazardous chemicals; (2) identification of products entering waste streams containing hazardous chemicals; (3) support circular economy initiatives within the EU. To meet these new reporting requirements industry will need to collect additional information from all supply chain actors, who as duty holders will also be required to report into the new EU SVHC database system. Failure to provide the required information may result in enforcement actions from the authorities, which could see products being restricted from the EEA. The new EU database system will be accessible to industry, regulators, NGOs and the general public. This paper explores the new requirements, together with feedback received from various stakeholders for collection of data and reporting into the new EU database system from 2021.
  • Creep response of various solders used in soldering ball grid array (BGA) on printed circuit board (PCB)

    Depiver, Joshua Adeniyi; Mallik, Sabuj; Amalu, Emeka H; University of Derby (Newsroom Limited, 2019-10)
    In electronics packaging, solder joints play a critical role by providing electrical, thermal and mechanical connections between the package and the printed circuit board (PCB). As the joint is both miniature and brittle, it is the weakest part of the assembly and thus susceptible to untimely damage. This paper presents the creep response of solder joints in a ball grid array (BGA) soldered on a PCB subjected to isothermal ageing in one experiment and temperature cycling in another test. The ageing is simulated in an ANSYS package environment at -40, 25, 75 and 150℃ temperatures applied for 45 days. The thermal cycling profile started from 22℃ and cycled between -40℃ and 150℃ with 15 minutes dwell time at the lowest and highest temperatures. The solders used in the investigation are lead-based eutectic solder alloy and lead-free SAC305, SAC387, and SAC396 solders. The research seeks to qualify these solders against strain and strain energy response for improved reliability in operation. The results show that the lead-free SAC387 accumulated the maximum strain and thus strain energy while the lead-based eutectic solder is found to accrue the least amount of the quantities. Further results show the distribution of damage in the BGA solder bump. Based on the results, it is proposed that lead-free SAC396 is the best replacement of the lead-based eutectic solder in the drive for the achievement of comparable thermo-mechanical reliability of assembled BGA on PCB.
  • Social reproduction strategies: Understanding compound inequality in the intergenerational transfer of capital, assets and resources

    Nunn, Alexander; Tepe-Belfrage, Daniela; University of Derby; University of Liverpool (SAGE, 2019-10-30)
    This paper focuses on the way that households respond to ‘global pressures’ by adapting their social reproduction strategies (SRS). We understand SRS to encapsulate the more or less consciously developed day-to-day and inter-generational responses to the social conditions that households confront and their own motivations and aspirations for the future. Yet, due to a range of extant inequalities of accumulated and dynamic resources – some of which are material and some of which are at once ethereal and embodied in the concrete labouring capacities of individuals – we argue that SRS and capacities to pursue them differ widely. Differences are conditioned by positionality, access to information and the construction of ‘economic imaginaries’ as well as material resources. By looking at these different expressions of SRS we highlight how they reinforce macro-scale socio-economic pressures, creating what we term ‘compound inequality’ into the future. Compound inequalities result from different behavioural responses to socio-economic conditions, inequality and (perceived or real) insecurity, which have the potential to exaggerate inequality and insecurity into the future. Inequalities do not just arise from formal economic markets then but also from the realm of social reproduction.
  • Towards being a "Good Cuban": socialist citizenship education in a globalized context.

    Smith, Rosemary; University of Nottingham (Springer, 21/10/2016)
    Considering the renewed diplomatic relations with the United States and to a globalized world, the Cuban State is forming global citizens while trying to retain socialist values in the face of increased market liberalization. Since the revolutionary period (1960s), Cuban education has stressed the intersecting values of fervent, resistant patriotism, hard work and active, solidary internationalism, as integral parts of the New Socialist Man/Woman or the “buen revolucionario” (good revolutionary). In this new economic, political and social context the Cuban government, its school system, and parents are challenged with preserving socialism and its accompanying values while preparing its young people for work and life in an evolving society and globalized world. Drawing on school textbooks and a wide range of interviews with young Cubans conducted by three education researchers, between 2011 and 2014, this chapter examines Cuban young people’s struggle to reconcile the contradictions and tensions between these ideals and the pragmatic reality of life, implying the need for new forms of national, international, global citizenship. Cuban youth are demanding a larger role in shaping their society if the government wants to keep them on the island. Consequently, the development of the buen revolucionario is taking on new meaning in the twenty-first century globalized world.
  • Cuba: educationaliImpact of the Cuban revolution

    Smith, Rosemary; University of Nottingham (Bloomsbury, 31/10/2019)
    Education in Mexico, Central America and the Latin Caribbean examines the development and practice of education in México, Costa Rica, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panamá. The chapters, written by local experts, provide an overview of the structure, aims and purposes of education in each of these ten countries with very different socio-economic backgrounds. The authors present curriculum standards, pedagogy, evaluation, accountability and delivery, discussing both how the formal systems are structured and how they actually function. The volume explores the origins of proposed reforms and their implementation, emphasising the distinctiveness of each country and attempting to locate new practices that could lead to better education.Including a comparative introduction to the issues facing education in the region as a whole and guides to available online datasets, this book is an essential reference for researchers, scholars, international agencies and policy-makers.
  • The “Three Ps” (perfecting, professionalization, and pragmatism) and their limitations for understanding Cuban education in the 1970s

    Smith, Rosemary; University of Nottingham (Rowman & Littlefield, 24/08/2018)
    This book provides, for the first time, a comprehensive assessment of the 1970s which challenges prevailing interpretations. Drawing from multidisciplinary perspectives and exploring a range of areas--including politics, international relations, culture, education, and healthcare--its contributing authors demonstrate that the decade was a time of intense transformation which proved pivotal to the development of the Revolution. Indeed, many of the ideas, approaches, policies, and legislation developed and tested during the 1970s maintain a very visible legacy in contemporary Cuba. In highlighting the complexity of the 1970s, this volume ultimately aims to contribute to a greater understanding of the Cuban Revolution and how it chooses to face the challenges of the twenty-first century.
  • Now we don’t see the university as something distant. It’s here in our hands’: situated pedagogy in Cuban municipal universities

    Smith, Rosemary; University of Nottingham (Institute for Education Policy Studies, 04/2019)
    The first years of the twenty-first century saw the introduction of a new mode of higher education in Cuba. Local university centres were set up across the country offering part time study to a range of students previously marginalised from higher education. As well as massively increasing access, this programme created a new kind of teacher – local professionals teaching part-time alongside their regular employment. Using the personal testimony of students and teachers in rural Granma, this paper examines the role of these teachers, with a particular emphasis on the value of their capacity to offer a pedagogy situated in the workplaces, communities and daily lives of their students.
  • Education, citizenship, and Cuban identity

    Smith, Rosemary; University of Nottingham (Palgrave Macmillan., 29/07/2016)
    This book explores how Cuba’s famously successful and inclusive education system has formed young Cubans’ political, social, and moral identities in a country transfigured by new inequalities and moral compromises made in the name of survival. The author examines this educational experience from the perspective of those who grew up in the years of economic crisis following the fall of the Soviet Union, charting their ideals, their frustrations and their struggle to reconcile revolutionary rhetoric with twenty-first century reality.
  • Charged-particle pseudorapidity density at mid-rapidity in p–Pb collisions at √sNN = 8.16 TeV

    Acharya, S.; Acosta, F.-T.; Adamová, D.; Adhya, S. P.; Adler, A.; Adolfsson, J.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Rinella, G. Aglieri; Agnello, M.; Ahammed, Z.; et al. (Springer Science, 2019-04-04)
    The pseudorapidity density of charged particles, dNch/dη, in p–Pb collisions has been measured at a centreof-mass energy per nucleon–nucleon pair of √sNN = 8.16 TeV at mid-seudorapidity for non-single-diffractive events. The results cover 3.6 units of pseudorapidity, |η| < 1.8. The dNch/dη value is 19.1 ± 0.7 at |η| < 0.5. This quantity divided by Npart /2 is 4.73±0.20, where Npart is the average number of participating nucleons, is 9.5% higher than the corresponding value for p–Pb collisions at √sNN = 5.02 TeV. Measurements are compared with models based on different mechanisms for particle production. All models agree within uncertainties with data in the Pb-going side, while HIJING overestimates, showing a symmetric behaviour, and EPOS underestimates the p-going side of the dNch/dη distribution. Saturation-based models reproduce the distributions well for η > −1.3. The dNch/dη is also measured for different centrality estimators, based both on the chargedparticle multiplicity and on the energy deposited in the ZeroDegree Calorimeters. A study of the implications of the large multiplicity fluctuations due to the small number of participants for systems like p–Pb in the centrality calculation for multiplicity-based estimators is discussed, demonstrating the advantages of determining the centrality with energy deposited near beam rapidity.
  • Pop-up shops for increasing employability and contributing to civil society in times of austerity

    Hill, Inge; Bass, Tina; Coventry University (Springer, 2019-09-24)
    This chapter discusses a learning and teaching unit pop-up shop rooted in experiential learning. This pop-up shop learning activity aims to increase employability and educate young learners how to contribute to civil society. The discussion offers a reflection on how lecturers’ roles are changing in response to the austerity informed UK policies and HE measures. Universities are increasingly required to generate larger numbers of enterprising, employment-ready graduates. Increased monitoring of the efficient use of public spending in HE has seen the introduction of the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) bringing more focus on employability rates, which in turn help to determine university rankings. These rankings put pressure on HE senior management, which is then passed down through the hierarchy to lecturers. The detailed guidance on how to run pop-up shops offers a pragmatic answer to the outlined challenges to inspire lecturers to develop their learning and teaching strategies. Particular attention is paid to developing reflective skills in learners.

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