Controlled antenatal thyroid screening II: Effect of treating maternal suboptimal thyroid function on child cognition.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/622840
Title:
Controlled antenatal thyroid screening II: Effect of treating maternal suboptimal thyroid function on child cognition.
Authors:
Hales, Charlotte; Taylor, Peter N.; Channon, Sue; Paradice, Ruth; McEwan, Kirsten ( 0000-0002-0945-0521 ) ; Zhang, Lei; Gyedu, Michael; Bakhsh, Ameen; Okosieme, Onyebuchi; Muller, Ilaria; Draman, Mohd S.; Gregory, John W.; Dayan, Colin; Lazarus, John H.; Rees, D Aled; Ludgate, Marian
Abstract:
Context and Objective The Controlled Antenatal Thyroid Screening (CATS) study investigated treatment of suboptimal gestational thyroid function (SGTF) on childhood cognition and found no difference in intelligence quotient (IQ) at 3 years between children of treated and untreated SGTF mothers. We have measured IQ in the same children at age 9.5 years and included children from normal gestational thyroid function (normal-GTF) mothers. Design, Setting, and Participants One examiner, blinded to participant group, assessed children’s IQ (Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Fourth Edition UK), long-term memory, and motor function (Developmental Neuropsychological Assessment II) from children of 119 treated and 98 untreated SGTF mothers plus children of 232 mothers with normal-GTF. Logistic regression explored the odds and percentages of an IQ < 85 in the groups. Results There was no difference in IQ < 85 between children of mothers with normal-GTF and combined SGTF, i.e., treated and untreated (fully adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.15 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.52, 2.51]; P = 0.731). Furthermore, there was no significant effect of treatment [untreated OR = 1.33 (95% CI 0.53, 3.34); treated OR = 0.75 (95% CI 0.27, 2.06) P = 0.576]. IQ < 85 was 6.03% in normal-GTF, 7.56% in treated, and 11.22% in untreated groups. Analyses accounting for treated-SGTF women with free thyroxine > 97.5th percentile of the entire CATS-I cohort revealed no significant effect on a child’s IQ < 85 in CATS-II. IQ at age 3 predicted IQ at age 9.5 (P < 0.0001) and accounted for 45% of the variation. Conclusions Maternal thyroxine during pregnancy did not improve child cognition at age 9.5 years. Our findings confirmed CATS-I and suggest that the lack of treatment effect may be a result of the similar proportion of IQ < 85 in children of women with normal-GTF and SGTF.
Affiliation:
Cardiff University
Citation:
Hales, C. et al (2018) 'Controlled Antenatal Thyroid Screening II: Effect of Treating Maternal Suboptimal Thyroid Function on Child Cognition', The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 103 (4):1583.
Publisher:
Oxford Academic
Journal:
The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism
Issue Date:
15-Jan-2018
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/622840
DOI:
10.1210/jc.2017-02378
Additional Links:
https://academic.oup.com/jcem/article/103/4/1583/4802113
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0021972X
EISSN:
19457197
Sponsors:
N/A
Appears in Collections:
Human Sciences Research Centre

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHales, Charlotteen
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Peter N.en
dc.contributor.authorChannon, Sueen
dc.contributor.authorParadice, Ruthen
dc.contributor.authorMcEwan, Kirstenen
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Leien
dc.contributor.authorGyedu, Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorBakhsh, Ameenen
dc.contributor.authorOkosieme, Onyebuchien
dc.contributor.authorMuller, Ilariaen
dc.contributor.authorDraman, Mohd S.en
dc.contributor.authorGregory, John W.en
dc.contributor.authorDayan, Colinen
dc.contributor.authorLazarus, John H.en
dc.contributor.authorRees, D Aleden
dc.contributor.authorLudgate, Marianen
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-27T14:15:20Z-
dc.date.available2018-07-27T14:15:20Z-
dc.date.issued2018-01-15-
dc.identifier.citationHales, C. et al (2018) 'Controlled Antenatal Thyroid Screening II: Effect of Treating Maternal Suboptimal Thyroid Function on Child Cognition', The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 103 (4):1583.en
dc.identifier.issn0021972X-
dc.identifier.doi10.1210/jc.2017-02378-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622840-
dc.description.abstractContext and Objective The Controlled Antenatal Thyroid Screening (CATS) study investigated treatment of suboptimal gestational thyroid function (SGTF) on childhood cognition and found no difference in intelligence quotient (IQ) at 3 years between children of treated and untreated SGTF mothers. We have measured IQ in the same children at age 9.5 years and included children from normal gestational thyroid function (normal-GTF) mothers. Design, Setting, and Participants One examiner, blinded to participant group, assessed children’s IQ (Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Fourth Edition UK), long-term memory, and motor function (Developmental Neuropsychological Assessment II) from children of 119 treated and 98 untreated SGTF mothers plus children of 232 mothers with normal-GTF. Logistic regression explored the odds and percentages of an IQ < 85 in the groups. Results There was no difference in IQ < 85 between children of mothers with normal-GTF and combined SGTF, i.e., treated and untreated (fully adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.15 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.52, 2.51]; P = 0.731). Furthermore, there was no significant effect of treatment [untreated OR = 1.33 (95% CI 0.53, 3.34); treated OR = 0.75 (95% CI 0.27, 2.06) P = 0.576]. IQ < 85 was 6.03% in normal-GTF, 7.56% in treated, and 11.22% in untreated groups. Analyses accounting for treated-SGTF women with free thyroxine > 97.5th percentile of the entire CATS-I cohort revealed no significant effect on a child’s IQ < 85 in CATS-II. IQ at age 3 predicted IQ at age 9.5 (P < 0.0001) and accounted for 45% of the variation. Conclusions Maternal thyroxine during pregnancy did not improve child cognition at age 9.5 years. Our findings confirmed CATS-I and suggest that the lack of treatment effect may be a result of the similar proportion of IQ < 85 in children of women with normal-GTF and SGTF.en
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford Academicen
dc.relation.urlhttps://academic.oup.com/jcem/article/103/4/1583/4802113en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolismen
dc.subjectThyroiden
dc.subjectChildrenen
dc.titleControlled antenatal thyroid screening II: Effect of treating maternal suboptimal thyroid function on child cognition.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn19457197-
dc.contributor.departmentCardiff Universityen
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolismen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom-
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom-
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Trials Research, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom-
dc.contributor.institutionSt David’s Hospital, Cardiff and Vale University Health Board, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom-
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Trials Research, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom-
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom-
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom-
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom-
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom-
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom-
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom-
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom-
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom-
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom-
dc.contributor.institutionNeuroscience and Mental Health Research Institute, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom-
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom-
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