Nineteenth-Century letters as a resource: Midlands women as a case study.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/622364
Title:
Nineteenth-Century letters as a resource: Midlands women as a case study.
Authors:
Flint, Alison Claire ( 0000-0002-3476-2156 )
Abstract:
This paper argues that a letter’s physicality is as important to the twenty-first century social historian as the written word. It is not enough to interpret the letter as a literary document nor is it intelligible to take the letter simply as an historical artefact for both lines of enquiry will result in the recounting of one half of the complete whole. A critical evaluation of the archival collection of the Ogston Estate in the heart of the Midlands, indicated that this group of records can deliver more than a concise male orientated genealogical record or history of a Midlands country estate. It has shown that, and most importantly to this study, the majority of the surviving familiar letters from one Midlands family, were written by women, principally the wives, mothers and daughters of the Turbutt/Gladwin family. This offers a unique insight into the personal preoccupations of gentry women in the Midlands, their economic roles and social lives not only from a gentry family focus but also as a vehicle from which to investigate the extent to which the letter and letter writing in the Midlands in the 1800s played a key role in feminine polite society.
Affiliation:
University of Derby
Citation:
Flint, A. C. (2017) 'Nineteenth-Century letters as a resource: Midlands women as a case study.' Presented at Women's History Roundtable, Centre for West Midlands History, University of Birmingham, 6th November.
Publisher:
Centre for West Midlands History
Issue Date:
Nov-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/622364
Additional Links:
https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/research/activity/cwmh/events/2017/womens-history-roundtable.aspx
Type:
Presentation
Language:
en
Sponsors:
N/A
Appears in Collections:
Department of Humanities

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFlint, Alison Claireen
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-16T14:53:39Z-
dc.date.available2018-03-16T14:53:39Z-
dc.date.issued2017-11-
dc.identifier.citationFlint, A. C. (2017) 'Nineteenth-Century letters as a resource: Midlands women as a case study.' Presented at Women's History Roundtable, Centre for West Midlands History, University of Birmingham, 6th November.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622364-
dc.description.abstractThis paper argues that a letter’s physicality is as important to the twenty-first century social historian as the written word. It is not enough to interpret the letter as a literary document nor is it intelligible to take the letter simply as an historical artefact for both lines of enquiry will result in the recounting of one half of the complete whole. A critical evaluation of the archival collection of the Ogston Estate in the heart of the Midlands, indicated that this group of records can deliver more than a concise male orientated genealogical record or history of a Midlands country estate. It has shown that, and most importantly to this study, the majority of the surviving familiar letters from one Midlands family, were written by women, principally the wives, mothers and daughters of the Turbutt/Gladwin family. This offers a unique insight into the personal preoccupations of gentry women in the Midlands, their economic roles and social lives not only from a gentry family focus but also as a vehicle from which to investigate the extent to which the letter and letter writing in the Midlands in the 1800s played a key role in feminine polite society.en
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCentre for West Midlands Historyen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.birmingham.ac.uk/research/activity/cwmh/events/2017/womens-history-roundtable.aspxen
dc.subjectLettersen
dc.subjectLetter writingen
dc.subjectWomenen
dc.subjectNineteenth centuryen
dc.titleNineteenth-Century letters as a resource: Midlands women as a case study.en
dc.typePresentationen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
All Items in UDORA are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.