Cultivating the compassionate self against depression: An exploration of processes of change.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/622222
Title:
Cultivating the compassionate self against depression: An exploration of processes of change.
Authors:
Matos, Marcela ( 0000-0001-7320-7107 ) ; Duarte, Joana; Duarte, Cristiana; Pinto-Gouveia, José; Gilbert, Paul ( 0000-0001-8431-9892 )
Abstract:
Introduction Compassion and self-compassion can be protective factors against mental health difficulties, in particular depression. The cultivation of the compassionate self, associated with a range of practices such as slow and deeper breathing, compassionate voice tones and facial expressions, and compassionate focusing, is central to compassion focused therapy (Gilbert, 2010). However, no study has examined the processes of change that mediate the impact of compassionate self-cultivation practices on depressive symptoms. Aims The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of a brief compassionate self training (CST) intervention on depressive symptoms, and explore the psychological processes that mediate the change at post intervention. Methods Using a longitudinal design, participants (general population and college students) were randomly assigned to one of two conditions: Compassionate self training (n = 56) and wait-list control (n = 37). Participants in the CST condition were instructed to practice CST exercises for 15 minutes everyday or in moments of stress during two weeks. Self-report measures of depression, self-criticism, shame and compassion, were completed at pre and post in both conditions. Results Results showed that, at post-intervention, participants in the CST condition decreased depression, self-criticism and shame, and increased self-compassion and openness to receive compassion from others. Mediation analyses revealed that changes in depression from pre to post intervention were mediated by decreases in self-criticism and shame, and increases in self-compassion and openness to the compassion from others. Conclusions These findings support the efficacy of compassionate self training components on lessening depressive symptoms and promoting mental health.
Affiliation:
University of Coimbra; University of Derby
Citation:
Matos, M. et al (2017) 'Cultivating the compassionate self against depression: An exploration of processes of change' European Psychiatry, 41:S356 .
Journal:
European Psychiatry
Issue Date:
Apr-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/622222
DOI:
10.1016/j.eurpsy.2017.02.344
Additional Links:
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0924933817326159; http://www.europsy-journal.com/article/S0924-9338%2817%2932615-9/fulltext
Type:
Meetings and Proceedings
Language:
en
ISSN:
09249338
Sponsors:
N/A
Appears in Collections:
Human Sciences Research Centre

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMatos, Marcelaen
dc.contributor.authorDuarte, Joanaen
dc.contributor.authorDuarte, Cristianaen
dc.contributor.authorPinto-Gouveia, Joséen
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, Paulen
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-28T17:42:05Z-
dc.date.available2018-02-28T17:42:05Z-
dc.date.issued2017-04-
dc.identifier.citationMatos, M. et al (2017) 'Cultivating the compassionate self against depression: An exploration of processes of change' European Psychiatry, 41:S356 .en
dc.identifier.issn09249338-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.eurpsy.2017.02.344-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622222-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction Compassion and self-compassion can be protective factors against mental health difficulties, in particular depression. The cultivation of the compassionate self, associated with a range of practices such as slow and deeper breathing, compassionate voice tones and facial expressions, and compassionate focusing, is central to compassion focused therapy (Gilbert, 2010). However, no study has examined the processes of change that mediate the impact of compassionate self-cultivation practices on depressive symptoms. Aims The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of a brief compassionate self training (CST) intervention on depressive symptoms, and explore the psychological processes that mediate the change at post intervention. Methods Using a longitudinal design, participants (general population and college students) were randomly assigned to one of two conditions: Compassionate self training (n = 56) and wait-list control (n = 37). Participants in the CST condition were instructed to practice CST exercises for 15 minutes everyday or in moments of stress during two weeks. Self-report measures of depression, self-criticism, shame and compassion, were completed at pre and post in both conditions. Results Results showed that, at post-intervention, participants in the CST condition decreased depression, self-criticism and shame, and increased self-compassion and openness to receive compassion from others. Mediation analyses revealed that changes in depression from pre to post intervention were mediated by decreases in self-criticism and shame, and increases in self-compassion and openness to the compassion from others. Conclusions These findings support the efficacy of compassionate self training components on lessening depressive symptoms and promoting mental health.en
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0924933817326159en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.europsy-journal.com/article/S0924-9338%2817%2932615-9/fulltexten
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to European Psychiatryen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectCompassionate selfen
dc.subjectDepressionen
dc.subjectCompassionen
dc.subjectProcessesen
dc.titleCultivating the compassionate self against depression: An exploration of processes of change.en
dc.typeMeetings and Proceedingsen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Coimbraen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalEuropean Psychiatryen
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