Development and validation of the forms of self-criticizing / attacking and self-reassuring scale - Short form.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/622202
Title:
Development and validation of the forms of self-criticizing / attacking and self-reassuring scale - Short form.
Authors:
Sommers-Spijkerman, Marion; Trompetter, Hester; ten Klooster, Peter; Schreurs, Karlein; Gilbert, Paul ( 0000-0001-8431-9892 ) ; Bohlmeijer, Ernst
Abstract:
Studies investigating the effectiveness of compassion-focused therapy (CFT) are growing rapidly. As CFT is oriented toward helping people deal with internal processes of self-to-self-relating, having instruments to measure these processes is important. The 22-item Forms of Self-Criticizing/Attacking and Self-Reassuring Scale (FSCRS) has been found a useful measure. In the present study, a 14-item short form of the FSCRS (FSCRS-SF) suited to studies requiring brief measures was developed and tested in a Dutch community sample (N = 363), and cross-validated in a sample consisting of participants in a study on the effectiveness of a guided self-help compassion training (N = 243). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) indicated acceptable to good fit of the FSCRS-SF items to a three-factor model. Findings regarding internal consistency were inconsistent, with Study 1 showing adequate internal consistency for all subscale scores and Study 2 demonstrating satisfactory internal consistency only for the reassured self (RS) subscale score. Furthermore, the results showed that the FSCRS-SF subscale scores had adequate test–retest reliability and satisfactory convergent validity estimates with theoretically related constructs. In addition, the FSCRS-SF subscale scores were found to be sensitive to changes in self-to-self relating over time. Despite mixed findings regarding its reliability requiring further investigation, the FSCRS-SF offers a valid and sensitive measure which shows promise as a complimentary shorter version to the original FSCRS suited to nonclinical populations. Given that the FSCRS is increasingly used as a process and outcome measure, further research on this short form in nonclinical and clinical populations is warranted.
Affiliation:
University of Twente; University of Derby
Citation:
Sommers-Spijkerman, M. et al (2017) 'Development and Validation of the Forms of Self-Criticizing/Attacking and Self-Reassuring Scale—Short Form.' Psychological Assessment, August, DOI: 10.1037/pas0000514
Publisher:
American Psychological Association
Journal:
Psychological Assessment
Issue Date:
10-Aug-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/622202
DOI:
10.1037/pas0000514
Additional Links:
http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/pas0000514
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1939134X
EISSN:
10403590
Sponsors:
N/A
Appears in Collections:
Human Sciences Research Centre

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSommers-Spijkerman, Marionen
dc.contributor.authorTrompetter, Hesteren
dc.contributor.authorten Klooster, Peteren
dc.contributor.authorSchreurs, Karleinen
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, Paulen
dc.contributor.authorBohlmeijer, Ernsten
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-22T16:28:27Z-
dc.date.available2018-02-22T16:28:27Z-
dc.date.issued2017-08-10-
dc.identifier.citationSommers-Spijkerman, M. et al (2017) 'Development and Validation of the Forms of Self-Criticizing/Attacking and Self-Reassuring Scale—Short Form.' Psychological Assessment, August, DOI: 10.1037/pas0000514en
dc.identifier.issn1939134X-
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/pas0000514-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/622202-
dc.description.abstractStudies investigating the effectiveness of compassion-focused therapy (CFT) are growing rapidly. As CFT is oriented toward helping people deal with internal processes of self-to-self-relating, having instruments to measure these processes is important. The 22-item Forms of Self-Criticizing/Attacking and Self-Reassuring Scale (FSCRS) has been found a useful measure. In the present study, a 14-item short form of the FSCRS (FSCRS-SF) suited to studies requiring brief measures was developed and tested in a Dutch community sample (N = 363), and cross-validated in a sample consisting of participants in a study on the effectiveness of a guided self-help compassion training (N = 243). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) indicated acceptable to good fit of the FSCRS-SF items to a three-factor model. Findings regarding internal consistency were inconsistent, with Study 1 showing adequate internal consistency for all subscale scores and Study 2 demonstrating satisfactory internal consistency only for the reassured self (RS) subscale score. Furthermore, the results showed that the FSCRS-SF subscale scores had adequate test–retest reliability and satisfactory convergent validity estimates with theoretically related constructs. In addition, the FSCRS-SF subscale scores were found to be sensitive to changes in self-to-self relating over time. Despite mixed findings regarding its reliability requiring further investigation, the FSCRS-SF offers a valid and sensitive measure which shows promise as a complimentary shorter version to the original FSCRS suited to nonclinical populations. Given that the FSCRS is increasingly used as a process and outcome measure, further research on this short form in nonclinical and clinical populations is warranted.en
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Associationen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/pas0000514en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Psychological Assessmenten
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectSelf-criticismen
dc.subjectSelf-reassuranceen
dc.subjectQuestionnaireen
dc.subjectPsychometric propertiesen
dc.titleDevelopment and validation of the forms of self-criticizing / attacking and self-reassuring scale - Short form.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn10403590-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Twenteen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalPsychological Assessmenten
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