Evaluating interviews which search for the truth with suspects: but are investigators’ self-assessments of their own skills truthful ones?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621945
Title:
Evaluating interviews which search for the truth with suspects: but are investigators’ self-assessments of their own skills truthful ones?
Authors:
Walsh, Dave ( 0000-0003-4950-6830 ) ; King, Mick; Griffiths, Andy
Abstract:
Self-evaluation of one’s own performance has been found in prior research to be an enabler of professional development. The task of evaluation is also a core component of a model of the investigative interviewing of victims, witnesses and suspects, being increasingly used throughout the world. However, it remains the case that there has been little research as to how practitioners approach the task itself. The present study examined the topic through the lens of observing how effectively 30 real-life investigators in the UK undertook evaluation of their interviews, representing almost the entire investigative frontline workforce of a small law enforcement agency in this country. Using an established scale of measurement, both investigators’ and an expert’s ratings of the same sample of interviews were compared across a range of tasks and behaviours. It was found that in almost all the assessed behaviours, requiring of the investigators to provide a self-rating, their scores tended to significantly outstrip those applied to the sample by the expert. Reasons are explored for the investigators’ overstated assessments. Implications for practice are then discussed.
Affiliation:
University of Derby
Citation:
Walsh, D. et al (2017) 'Evaluating interviews which search for the truth with suspects: but are investigators’ self-assessments of their own skills truthful ones?', Psychology, Crime & Law, 23 (7):647
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Journal:
Psychology, Crime & Law
Issue Date:
9-Mar-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621945
DOI:
10.1080/1068316X.2017.1296149
Additional Links:
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/1068316X.2017.1296149
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1068316X
EISSN:
14772744
Sponsors:
N/A
Appears in Collections:
Derby Law School

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWalsh, Daveen
dc.contributor.authorKing, Micken
dc.contributor.authorGriffiths, Andyen
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-10T09:52:56Z-
dc.date.available2017-11-10T09:52:56Z-
dc.date.issued2017-03-09-
dc.identifier.citationWalsh, D. et al (2017) 'Evaluating interviews which search for the truth with suspects: but are investigators’ self-assessments of their own skills truthful ones?', Psychology, Crime & Law, 23 (7):647en
dc.identifier.issn1068316X-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/1068316X.2017.1296149-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621945-
dc.description.abstractSelf-evaluation of one’s own performance has been found in prior research to be an enabler of professional development. The task of evaluation is also a core component of a model of the investigative interviewing of victims, witnesses and suspects, being increasingly used throughout the world. However, it remains the case that there has been little research as to how practitioners approach the task itself. The present study examined the topic through the lens of observing how effectively 30 real-life investigators in the UK undertook evaluation of their interviews, representing almost the entire investigative frontline workforce of a small law enforcement agency in this country. Using an established scale of measurement, both investigators’ and an expert’s ratings of the same sample of interviews were compared across a range of tasks and behaviours. It was found that in almost all the assessed behaviours, requiring of the investigators to provide a self-rating, their scores tended to significantly outstrip those applied to the sample by the expert. Reasons are explored for the investigators’ overstated assessments. Implications for practice are then discussed.en
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/1068316X.2017.1296149en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Psychology, Crime & Lawen
dc.subjectInvestigative interviewingen
dc.subjectPEACE modelen
dc.subjectSkills evaluationen
dc.subjectSelf-evalutionen
dc.subjectInvestigation skillsen
dc.titleEvaluating interviews which search for the truth with suspects: but are investigators’ self-assessments of their own skills truthful ones?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn14772744-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalPsychology, Crime & Lawen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Social Sciences, University of Derby, Derby, UK-
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Social Sciences, University of Derby, Derby, UK-
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Social Sciences, University of Derby, Derby, UK-
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