Seasonally resolved isotopic temperature data as a tool for identifying the cause of marine climate change in the Pliocene

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621800
Title:
Seasonally resolved isotopic temperature data as a tool for identifying the cause of marine climate change in the Pliocene
Authors:
Johnson, Andrew L. A.; Valentine, Annemarie; Leng, Melanie J.; Sloane, Hilary J.; Schoene, Bernd; Surge, Donna
Abstract:
Alteration in the pattern and vigour of ocean currents has often been invoked as the principal driver of changes in regional climate, including cases in the recent past (Pliocene, Pleistocene and Holocene) and instances predicted in the near future. The theory behind such interpretations is, however, suspect (e.g. Crowley, 1996; Seager et al., 2002), and it may be that other regional or global drivers are more important. The present cool temperate marine climate on the US eastern seaboard north of Cape Hatteras (northernmost North Carolina and Virginia) reflects the influence of cool southward-flowing currents, and a similar influence can be inferred in the Early Pliocene (Johnson et al., 2017). Change to a warm temperate (or marginally subtropical) marine climate in the Late Pliocene has been ascribed to the impingement on the area of warm, northward-flowing currents, assisted by the absence of a barrier equivalent to Cape Hatteras (e.g. Williams et al., 2009). Seasonally resolved oxygen isotope (δ18O) data from bivalve shells reveals, however, that seasonal temperature range was often in excess of that characteristic of the area south of Cape Hatteras (influenced by warm currents), and indicates the continuing influence of cold currents from the north (Johnson et al., 2017). Some isotopic evidence of seasonal temperature range from bivalves is consistent with warm-current influence (Winkelstern et al., 2013), but otherwise the evidence points to a different control (probably global climatic change) on the Late Pliocene warming of marine climate on the US eastern seaboard that is shown by isotopic data for annual average temperature. References: Crowley, T.J. (1996) Pliocene climates: The nature of the problem. Marine Micropaleontology, 27, 3-12. Johnson, A.L.A., Valentine, A., Leng, M.J., Sloane, H.J., Schöne, B.R., Balson, P.S. (2017) Isotopic temperatures from the Early and Mid-Pliocene of the US Middle Atlantic Coastal Plain, and their implications for the cause of regional marine climate change. PALAIOS, 32, 250-269. Seager, R., Battisti, D.S., Yin, J., Gordon, N., Naik, N.H., Clement, A.C., Cane, M.A. (2002) Is the Gulf Stream responsible for Europe's mild winters? Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, 128, 2563-2586. Williams, M., Haywood, A.M., Harper, E.M., Johnson, A.L.A., Knowles, T., Leng, M.J., Lunt, D.J., Okamura, B., Taylor, P.D., Zalaziewicz, J. (2009) Pliocene climate and seasonality in North Atlantic shelf seas. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, Series A, 367, 85–108. Winkelstern, I., Surge, D., Hudley, J.W. (2013) Multiproxy sclerochronological evidence for Plio-Pleistocene regional warmth: United States Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain. PALAIOS, 28, 649-660.
Affiliation:
University of Derby; University of Loughborough; British Geological Survey; University of Mainz; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Citation:
Johnson ALA, Valentine A, Leng MJ, Sloane HJ, Schöne BR & Surge D (2017) 'Seasonally resolved isotopic temperature data as a tool for identifying the cause of marine climate change in the Pliocene.' Stable Isotope Mass Spectrometry User Group Meeting (British Geological Survey, Keyworth, 5-7 July 2017), Programme and Abstracts, 18.
Issue Date:
7-Jul-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621800
Additional Links:
http://simsug2017.strikingly.com/
Type:
Presentation
Language:
en
Sponsors:
N/A
Appears in Collections:
Environmental Sustainability Research Centre

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Andrew L. A.en
dc.contributor.authorValentine, Annemarieen
dc.contributor.authorLeng, Melanie J.en
dc.contributor.authorSloane, Hilary J.en
dc.contributor.authorSchoene, Bernden
dc.contributor.authorSurge, Donnaen
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-03T15:06:30Z-
dc.date.available2017-08-03T15:06:30Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-07-
dc.identifier.citationJohnson ALA, Valentine A, Leng MJ, Sloane HJ, Schöne BR & Surge D (2017) 'Seasonally resolved isotopic temperature data as a tool for identifying the cause of marine climate change in the Pliocene.' Stable Isotope Mass Spectrometry User Group Meeting (British Geological Survey, Keyworth, 5-7 July 2017), Programme and Abstracts, 18.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621800-
dc.description.abstractAlteration in the pattern and vigour of ocean currents has often been invoked as the principal driver of changes in regional climate, including cases in the recent past (Pliocene, Pleistocene and Holocene) and instances predicted in the near future. The theory behind such interpretations is, however, suspect (e.g. Crowley, 1996; Seager et al., 2002), and it may be that other regional or global drivers are more important. The present cool temperate marine climate on the US eastern seaboard north of Cape Hatteras (northernmost North Carolina and Virginia) reflects the influence of cool southward-flowing currents, and a similar influence can be inferred in the Early Pliocene (Johnson et al., 2017). Change to a warm temperate (or marginally subtropical) marine climate in the Late Pliocene has been ascribed to the impingement on the area of warm, northward-flowing currents, assisted by the absence of a barrier equivalent to Cape Hatteras (e.g. Williams et al., 2009). Seasonally resolved oxygen isotope (δ18O) data from bivalve shells reveals, however, that seasonal temperature range was often in excess of that characteristic of the area south of Cape Hatteras (influenced by warm currents), and indicates the continuing influence of cold currents from the north (Johnson et al., 2017). Some isotopic evidence of seasonal temperature range from bivalves is consistent with warm-current influence (Winkelstern et al., 2013), but otherwise the evidence points to a different control (probably global climatic change) on the Late Pliocene warming of marine climate on the US eastern seaboard that is shown by isotopic data for annual average temperature. References: Crowley, T.J. (1996) Pliocene climates: The nature of the problem. Marine Micropaleontology, 27, 3-12. Johnson, A.L.A., Valentine, A., Leng, M.J., Sloane, H.J., Schöne, B.R., Balson, P.S. (2017) Isotopic temperatures from the Early and Mid-Pliocene of the US Middle Atlantic Coastal Plain, and their implications for the cause of regional marine climate change. PALAIOS, 32, 250-269. Seager, R., Battisti, D.S., Yin, J., Gordon, N., Naik, N.H., Clement, A.C., Cane, M.A. (2002) Is the Gulf Stream responsible for Europe's mild winters? Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, 128, 2563-2586. Williams, M., Haywood, A.M., Harper, E.M., Johnson, A.L.A., Knowles, T., Leng, M.J., Lunt, D.J., Okamura, B., Taylor, P.D., Zalaziewicz, J. (2009) Pliocene climate and seasonality in North Atlantic shelf seas. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, Series A, 367, 85–108. Winkelstern, I., Surge, D., Hudley, J.W. (2013) Multiproxy sclerochronological evidence for Plio-Pleistocene regional warmth: United States Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain. PALAIOS, 28, 649-660.en
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://simsug2017.strikingly.com/en
dc.subjectPalaeoceanographyen
dc.subjectPlioceneen
dc.subjectSclerochronologyen
dc.subjectUSAen
dc.titleSeasonally resolved isotopic temperature data as a tool for identifying the cause of marine climate change in the Plioceneen
dc.typePresentationen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Loughboroughen
dc.contributor.departmentBritish Geological Surveyen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Mainzen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hillen
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