Evolutionary models: Practical and conceptual utility for the treatment and study of social anxiety disorder

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621771
Title:
Evolutionary models: Practical and conceptual utility for the treatment and study of social anxiety disorder
Authors:
Gilbert, Paul ( 0000-0001-8431-9892 )
Abstract:
It is well known that group living poses certain challenges in that some individuals will be potentially threatening (eliciting either fight and flight or submissive responses), while others offer potential opportunities for reproduction, and forming cooperative, sharing alliances (requiring approach and display behaviour). The navigation of these challenges has led to the evolution of mechanisms for the estimation of threat versus opportunity (approach and avoidance). This chapter explores social anxiety in this evolutionary context. It highlights recent adaptations to social competition by which social rank and position are competed for with demonstrations of attractiveness (e.g., talent, physical beauty, humour, intelligence, personality, altruism). This is competition to be chosen by others for various roles (e.g., as friends, team mates, sexual partners, work employees). This chapter builds on earlier models of social anxiety which focused on impression management, and links them to evolutionary concepts of social status and desirability competition.
Affiliation:
University of Derby
Citation:
Gilbert, P. (2014) 'Evolutionary Models: Practical and Conceptual Utility for the Treatment and Study of Social Anxiety Disorder' in Weeks, J. W. (eds.) The Wiley Blackwell Handbook of Social Anxiety Disorder, Oxford: Wiley Blackwell, pp. 24-52
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell
Issue Date:
1-Mar-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621771
DOI:
10.1002/9781118653920.ch2
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/9781118653920.ch2/summary
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
ISBN:
9781119968603
Sponsors:
N/A
Appears in Collections:
Centre for Psychological Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, Paulen
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-27T13:12:05Z-
dc.date.available2017-07-27T13:12:05Z-
dc.date.issued2014-03-01-
dc.identifier.citationGilbert, P. (2014) 'Evolutionary Models: Practical and Conceptual Utility for the Treatment and Study of Social Anxiety Disorder' in Weeks, J. W. (eds.) The Wiley Blackwell Handbook of Social Anxiety Disorder, Oxford: Wiley Blackwell, pp. 24-52en
dc.identifier.isbn9781119968603-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/9781118653920.ch2-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621771-
dc.description.abstractIt is well known that group living poses certain challenges in that some individuals will be potentially threatening (eliciting either fight and flight or submissive responses), while others offer potential opportunities for reproduction, and forming cooperative, sharing alliances (requiring approach and display behaviour). The navigation of these challenges has led to the evolution of mechanisms for the estimation of threat versus opportunity (approach and avoidance). This chapter explores social anxiety in this evolutionary context. It highlights recent adaptations to social competition by which social rank and position are competed for with demonstrations of attractiveness (e.g., talent, physical beauty, humour, intelligence, personality, altruism). This is competition to be chosen by others for various roles (e.g., as friends, team mates, sexual partners, work employees). This chapter builds on earlier models of social anxiety which focused on impression management, and links them to evolutionary concepts of social status and desirability competition.en
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley Blackwellen
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/9781118653920.ch2/summaryen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectCompassionen
dc.subjectCompassion focused therapyen
dc.subjectSocial anxiety disorderen
dc.subjectEvolutionen
dc.subjectShameen
dc.subjectClinical psychologyen
dc.titleEvolutionary models: Practical and conceptual utility for the treatment and study of social anxiety disorderen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
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