Effect of exercise interventions on perceived fatigue in people with multiple sclerosis: synthesis of meta-analytic reviews

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621770
Title:
Effect of exercise interventions on perceived fatigue in people with multiple sclerosis: synthesis of meta-analytic reviews
Authors:
Safari, Reza; Van der Linden, Marietta L.; Mercer, Tom H.
Abstract:
Although exercise training has been advocated as a nonpharmacological treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS) related fatigue, no consensus exists regarding its effectiveness. To address this, we collated meta-analytic reviews that explored the effectiveness of exercise training for the treatment of MS-related fatigue. We searched five online databases for relevant reviews, published since 2005, and identified 172 records. Five reviews were retained for systematic extraction of information and evidence quality analysis. Although our review synthesis indicated that exercise training interventions have a moderate effect on fatigue reduction in people with MS, no clear insight was obtained regarding the relative effectiveness of specific types or modes of exercise intervention. Moreover, Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation revealed that the overall quality of evidence emanating from these five reviews was ‘very low’.
Affiliation:
University of Derby; Queen Margaret University
Citation:
Safari, R. et al (2017) 'Effect of exercise interventions on perceived fatigue in people with multiple sclerosis: synthesis of meta-analytic reviews, Neurodegenerative Disease Management, 7 (3):219
Publisher:
Future Medicine
Journal:
Neurodegenerative Disease Management
Issue Date:
20-Jun-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621770
DOI:
10.2217/nmt-2017-0009
Additional Links:
http://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/10.2217/nmt-2017-0009
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
17582024
EISSN:
17582032
Sponsors:
N/A
Appears in Collections:
Health and Social Care Research Centre

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSafari, Rezaen
dc.contributor.authorVan der Linden, Marietta L.en
dc.contributor.authorMercer, Tom H.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-27T12:41:36Z-
dc.date.available2017-07-27T12:41:36Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-20-
dc.identifier.citationSafari, R. et al (2017) 'Effect of exercise interventions on perceived fatigue in people with multiple sclerosis: synthesis of meta-analytic reviews, Neurodegenerative Disease Management, 7 (3):219en
dc.identifier.issn17582024-
dc.identifier.doi10.2217/nmt-2017-0009-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621770-
dc.description.abstractAlthough exercise training has been advocated as a nonpharmacological treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS) related fatigue, no consensus exists regarding its effectiveness. To address this, we collated meta-analytic reviews that explored the effectiveness of exercise training for the treatment of MS-related fatigue. We searched five online databases for relevant reviews, published since 2005, and identified 172 records. Five reviews were retained for systematic extraction of information and evidence quality analysis. Although our review synthesis indicated that exercise training interventions have a moderate effect on fatigue reduction in people with MS, no clear insight was obtained regarding the relative effectiveness of specific types or modes of exercise intervention. Moreover, Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation revealed that the overall quality of evidence emanating from these five reviews was ‘very low’.en
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherFuture Medicineen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/10.2217/nmt-2017-0009en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Neurodegenerative Disease Managementen
dc.subjectExerciseen
dc.subjectMultiple Sclerosisen
dc.subjectFatigueen
dc.subjectReviewen
dc.titleEffect of exercise interventions on perceived fatigue in people with multiple sclerosis: synthesis of meta-analytic reviewsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn17582032-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.contributor.departmentQueen Margaret Universityen
dc.identifier.journalNeurodegenerative Disease Managementen
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Health & Social Care Research, College of Health & Social Care, University of Derby, Derby, DE22 1GB, UK-
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Health & Social Care Research, College of Health & Social Care, University of Derby, Derby, DE22 1GB, UK-
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Health & Social Care Research, College of Health & Social Care, University of Derby, Derby, DE22 1GB, UK-
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