Practical compassions: repertoires of practice and compassion talk in acute mental healthcare

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621740
Title:
Practical compassions: repertoires of practice and compassion talk in acute mental healthcare
Authors:
Brown, Brian; Crawford, Paul; Gilbert, Paul ( 0000-0001-8431-9892 ) ; Gilbert, Jean; Gale, Corinne
Abstract:
This article reports an exploratory study of the concept of compassion in the work of 20 mental health practitioners in a UK Midlands facility. Using notions of practice derived from phenomenology and Bourdieusian sociology and notions of emotional labour we identify two contrasting interpretive repertoires in discussions of compassion. The first, the practical compassion repertoire, evokes the practical, physical and bodily aspects of compassion. It involves organising being with patients, playing games, anticipating disruption and taking them outside for cigarettes. Practitioners described being aware that these practical, bodily activities could lead to patients ‘opening up’, disclosing their interior concerns and enabling practical, compassionate mental health work to take place. In contrast, the second, organisational repertoire, concerns organisational constraints on compassionate practice. The shortage of staff, the record-keeping and internal processes of quality control were seen as time-greedy and apt to detract from contact with patients. The findings are discussed in relation to Bourdieu and Merleau-Ponty's phenomenological accounts of practice and habit and set in context in the growing interest in placing compassion centrally in healthcare. We also explore how the exercise of compassion in the way our participants describe it can afford the more effective exercise of medical power.
Affiliation:
DeMontfort University; Nottingham University; University of Derby
Citation:
Brown, B. (2014) 'Practical compassions: repertoires of practice and compassion talk in acute mental healthcare', Sociology of Health & Illness, 36 (3):383
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Sociology of Health & Illness
Issue Date:
11-Oct-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621740
DOI:
10.1111/1467-9566.12065
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/1467-9566.12065
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
01419889
Sponsors:
N/A
Appears in Collections:
Centre for Psychological Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Brianen
dc.contributor.authorCrawford, Paulen
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, Paulen
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, Jeanen
dc.contributor.authorGale, Corinneen
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-14T14:04:47Z-
dc.date.available2017-07-14T14:04:47Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-11-
dc.identifier.citationBrown, B. (2014) 'Practical compassions: repertoires of practice and compassion talk in acute mental healthcare', Sociology of Health & Illness, 36 (3):383en
dc.identifier.issn01419889-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1467-9566.12065-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621740-
dc.description.abstractThis article reports an exploratory study of the concept of compassion in the work of 20 mental health practitioners in a UK Midlands facility. Using notions of practice derived from phenomenology and Bourdieusian sociology and notions of emotional labour we identify two contrasting interpretive repertoires in discussions of compassion. The first, the practical compassion repertoire, evokes the practical, physical and bodily aspects of compassion. It involves organising being with patients, playing games, anticipating disruption and taking them outside for cigarettes. Practitioners described being aware that these practical, bodily activities could lead to patients ‘opening up’, disclosing their interior concerns and enabling practical, compassionate mental health work to take place. In contrast, the second, organisational repertoire, concerns organisational constraints on compassionate practice. The shortage of staff, the record-keeping and internal processes of quality control were seen as time-greedy and apt to detract from contact with patients. The findings are discussed in relation to Bourdieu and Merleau-Ponty's phenomenological accounts of practice and habit and set in context in the growing interest in placing compassion centrally in healthcare. We also explore how the exercise of compassion in the way our participants describe it can afford the more effective exercise of medical power.en
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/1467-9566.12065en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Sociology of Health & Illnessen
dc.subjectCompassionen
dc.subjectBourdieuen
dc.subjectMental healthen
dc.subjectPhenomenologyen
dc.titlePractical compassions: repertoires of practice and compassion talk in acute mental healthcareen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDeMontfort Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentNottingham Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalSociology of Health & Illnessen
dc.contributor.institutionFaculty of Health and Life Sciences; De Montfort University; Leicester UK-
dc.contributor.institutionDivision of Nursing; Nottingham University; Nottingham UK-
dc.contributor.institutionMental Health Research Unit; University of Derby; Derby UK-
dc.contributor.institutionMental Health Research Unit; University of Derby; Derby UK-
dc.contributor.institutionMental Health Research Unit; University of Derby; Derby UK-
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