How gender-expectancy affects the processing of “them”

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621535
Title:
How gender-expectancy affects the processing of “them”
Authors:
Doherty, Alice; Conklin, Kathy ( 0000-0003-2347-8018 )
Abstract:
How sensitive is pronoun processing to expectancies based on real-world knowledge and language usage? The current study links research on the integration of gender stereotypes and number-mismatch to explore this question. It focuses on the use of them to refer to antecedents of different levels of gender-expectancy (low–cyclist, high–mechanic, known–spokeswoman). In a rating task, them is considered increasingly unnatural with greater gender-expectancy. However, participants might not be able to differentiate high-expectancy and gender-known antecedents online because they initially search for plural antecedents (e.g., Sanford & Filik), and they make all-or-nothing gender inferences. An eye-tracking study reveals early differences in the processing of them with antecedents of high gender-expectancy compared with gender-known antecedents. This suggests that participants have rapid access to the expected gender of the antecedent and the level of that expectancy.
Affiliation:
University of Derby; University of Nottingham
Citation:
Doherty, A. and Conklin, K. (2016) 'How gender-expectancy affects the processing of “them” ', The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 70 (4):718.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Journal:
The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology
Issue Date:
15-Mar-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621535
DOI:
10.1080/17470218.2016.1154582
Additional Links:
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17470218.2016.1154582
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
17470218
EISSN:
17470226
Sponsors:
N/A
Appears in Collections:
University of Derby Online (UDOL)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDoherty, Aliceen
dc.contributor.authorConklin, Kathyen
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-03T08:40:30Z-
dc.date.available2017-04-03T08:40:30Z-
dc.date.issued2016-03-15-
dc.identifier.citationDoherty, A. and Conklin, K. (2016) 'How gender-expectancy affects the processing of “them” ', The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 70 (4):718.en
dc.identifier.issn17470218-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17470218.2016.1154582-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621535-
dc.description.abstractHow sensitive is pronoun processing to expectancies based on real-world knowledge and language usage? The current study links research on the integration of gender stereotypes and number-mismatch to explore this question. It focuses on the use of them to refer to antecedents of different levels of gender-expectancy (low–cyclist, high–mechanic, known–spokeswoman). In a rating task, them is considered increasingly unnatural with greater gender-expectancy. However, participants might not be able to differentiate high-expectancy and gender-known antecedents online because they initially search for plural antecedents (e.g., Sanford & Filik), and they make all-or-nothing gender inferences. An eye-tracking study reveals early differences in the processing of them with antecedents of high gender-expectancy compared with gender-known antecedents. This suggests that participants have rapid access to the expected gender of the antecedent and the level of that expectancy.en
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17470218.2016.1154582en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychologyen
dc.subjectPronounen
dc.subjectNumber agreementen
dc.subjectGenderen
dc.subjectLanguageen
dc.titleHow gender-expectancy affects the processing of “them”en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn17470226-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Nottinghamen
dc.identifier.journalThe Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychologyen
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