Temporal processing of emotional stimuli: The capture and release of attention by angry faces

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621486
Title:
Temporal processing of emotional stimuli: The capture and release of attention by angry faces
Authors:
Maratos, Frances A. ( 0000-0001-5738-6491 )
Abstract:
Neuroimaging data suggest that emotional information, especially threatening faces, automatically captures attention and receives rapid processing. While this is consistent with the majority of behavioral data, behavioral studies of the attentional blink (AB) additionally reveal that aversive emotional first target (T1) stimuli are associated with prolonged attentional engagement or “dwell” time. One explanation for this difference is that few AB studies have utilized manipulations of facial emotion as the T1. To address this, schematic faces varying in expression (neutral, angry, happy) served as the T1 in the current research. Results revealed that the blink associated with an angry T1 face was, primarily, of greater magnitude than that associated with either a neutral or happy T1 face, and also that initial recovery from this processing bias was faster following angry, compared with happy, T1 faces. The current data therefore provide important information regarding the time-course of attentional capture by angry faces: Angry faces are associated with both the rapid capture and rapid release of attention.
Affiliation:
University of Derby
Citation:
Maratos, F. A (2011) 'Temporal processing of emotional stimuli: The capture and release of attention by angry faces', Emotion, 11 (5):1242
Publisher:
American Psychological Association
Journal:
Emotion
Issue Date:
Oct-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621486
DOI:
10.1037/a0024279
Additional Links:
http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/a0024279
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
19311516
EISSN:
15283542
Sponsors:
N/A
Appears in Collections:
Human Sciences Research Centre

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMaratos, Frances A.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-15T16:58:21Z-
dc.date.available2017-03-15T16:58:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-
dc.identifier.citationMaratos, F. A (2011) 'Temporal processing of emotional stimuli: The capture and release of attention by angry faces', Emotion, 11 (5):1242en
dc.identifier.issn19311516-
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/a0024279-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621486-
dc.description.abstractNeuroimaging data suggest that emotional information, especially threatening faces, automatically captures attention and receives rapid processing. While this is consistent with the majority of behavioral data, behavioral studies of the attentional blink (AB) additionally reveal that aversive emotional first target (T1) stimuli are associated with prolonged attentional engagement or “dwell” time. One explanation for this difference is that few AB studies have utilized manipulations of facial emotion as the T1. To address this, schematic faces varying in expression (neutral, angry, happy) served as the T1 in the current research. Results revealed that the blink associated with an angry T1 face was, primarily, of greater magnitude than that associated with either a neutral or happy T1 face, and also that initial recovery from this processing bias was faster following angry, compared with happy, T1 faces. The current data therefore provide important information regarding the time-course of attentional capture by angry faces: Angry faces are associated with both the rapid capture and rapid release of attention.en
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Associationen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/a0024279en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Emotionen
dc.subjectHuman expressionsen
dc.subjectAttentional blinken
dc.subjectFacesen
dc.subjectTarget stimulien
dc.subjectEmotion induced blindnessen
dc.titleTemporal processing of emotional stimuli: The capture and release of attention by angry facesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn15283542-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalEmotionen
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