Virtually home: Exploring the potential of virtual reality to support patient discharge after stroke

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621379
Title:
Virtually home: Exploring the potential of virtual reality to support patient discharge after stroke
Authors:
Threapleton, Kate; Newberry, Karen; Sutton, Greg; Worthington, Esme; Drummond, Avril
Abstract:
Introduction: The level of assessment and intervention received by patients prior to discharge varies widely across stroke services in the United Kingdom. This study aimed to explore the potential value of virtual reality in preparing patients for discharge following stroke. Method: Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 13 occupational therapists, eight patients with a stroke and four community stroke survivors. Views were sought of the perceived acceptability, potential utility and limitations of a ‘virtual home’ environment for use in pre-discharge education and assessment. Data were analysed thematically. Findings: Interviewees found the virtual home to be an acceptable and visual means of facilitating discussions about discharge. It was perceived as valuable in assessing patient insight into safety risks and exploring the implications of installing assistive equipment at home. Limitations were identified relating to specific software issues and the use of virtual reality with patients with cognitive or perceptual impairments. Conclusion: The results demonstrate the potential utility of the virtual home within stroke rehabilitation. Patients and therapists engaged with the virtual home and, moreover, made practical suggestions for future development. Feasibility and pilot testing in a clinical setting is required to compare the use of the virtual home with traditional approaches of pre-discharge assessment.
Affiliation:
University of Nottingham; University of Derby
Citation:
Theapleton, K. et al (2017) 'Virtually home: Exploring the potential of virtual reality to support patient discharge after stroke', British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 80(2) DOI 10.1177/0308022616657111
Journal:
British Journal of Occupational Therapy
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621379
DOI:
10.1177/0308022616657111
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
03080226
Sponsors:
Stroke Association (ref: TSA SRTF 2013/01) and Nottingham Hospitals Charity and NUH Department of Research and Development – Pump Priming Award
Appears in Collections:
Department of Therapeutic Practice

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThreapleton, Kateen
dc.contributor.authorNewberry, Karenen
dc.contributor.authorSutton, Gregen
dc.contributor.authorWorthington, Esmeen
dc.contributor.authorDrummond, Avrilen
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-15T12:06:42Z-
dc.date.available2017-02-15T12:06:42Z-
dc.date.issued2017-02-01-
dc.identifier.citationTheapleton, K. et al (2017) 'Virtually home: Exploring the potential of virtual reality to support patient discharge after stroke', British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 80(2) DOI 10.1177/0308022616657111en
dc.identifier.issn03080226en
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0308022616657111en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621379-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: The level of assessment and intervention received by patients prior to discharge varies widely across stroke services in the United Kingdom. This study aimed to explore the potential value of virtual reality in preparing patients for discharge following stroke. Method: Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 13 occupational therapists, eight patients with a stroke and four community stroke survivors. Views were sought of the perceived acceptability, potential utility and limitations of a ‘virtual home’ environment for use in pre-discharge education and assessment. Data were analysed thematically. Findings: Interviewees found the virtual home to be an acceptable and visual means of facilitating discussions about discharge. It was perceived as valuable in assessing patient insight into safety risks and exploring the implications of installing assistive equipment at home. Limitations were identified relating to specific software issues and the use of virtual reality with patients with cognitive or perceptual impairments. Conclusion: The results demonstrate the potential utility of the virtual home within stroke rehabilitation. Patients and therapists engaged with the virtual home and, moreover, made practical suggestions for future development. Feasibility and pilot testing in a clinical setting is required to compare the use of the virtual home with traditional approaches of pre-discharge assessment.en
dc.description.sponsorshipStroke Association (ref: TSA SRTF 2013/01) and Nottingham Hospitals Charity and NUH Department of Research and Development – Pump Priming Awarden
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectVirtual Realityen
dc.subjectOccupational Therapyen
dc.subjectStrokeen
dc.subjectRehabilitationen
dc.subjectDischarge Llanningen
dc.titleVirtually home: Exploring the potential of virtual reality to support patient discharge after strokeen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Nottinghamen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Occupational Therapyen
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