Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621335
Title:
Disintermediation in the apparel supply chain
Authors:
Oxborrow, Lynn; Brindley, Clare
Abstract:
Purpose The apparel industry has acted as a microcosm of global industrial change, exemplified by changes in structure, relationships and technologies. The purpose of this paper is to identify the risk drivers, the changing supply strategies and the relationships suppliers are developing or exiting from, notably because of the increasing power of retailers in the fast fashion sector. Design/methodology/approach The research adopts a qualitative, case study methodology of the Leicester (UK) based suppliers who operate in the fast fashion market. Findings Rich narrative data shows that the apparel supply chain has changed. The small and medium size enterprises (SMEs) have had more success in managing the upstream rather than the downstream, supported by their move towards a more design driven system. This willingness has been motivated by their wish to "own" the relationship with the buyer but this has not always resulted in greater power or returns and relationships have continued to be fractious. Research limitations/implications There is a lack of research on supply chains, especially, apparel supply chains that focus on reality rather than best practice. This paper addresses the power relationships that are exerted in the supply chain and the cultural aspects that influence them, which have hitherto lacked academic focus. Originality/value Adds empirical data to the theoretical work in the area, specifically, the shape of SME supply chains and the nature of risk in supplying fast fashion. It identifies the unequal power base of the supply chain and SMEs strategies for coping, or not, to some extent dependent on their culture.
Affiliation:
Nottingham Trent University
Citation:
OXBORROW, L. and BRINDLEY, C.,(2014.) Disintermediation in the apparel supply chain., Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal.Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, 18 (3), pp. 252-268.
Publisher:
Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Journal:
Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal
Issue Date:
2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621335
DOI:
10.1108/JFMM-10-2011-0071
Additional Links:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JFMM-10-2011-0071
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
13612026
Appears in Collections:
Research, Innovation and Academic Enterprise

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOxborrow, Lynnen
dc.contributor.authorBrindley, Clareen
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-31T16:56:45Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-31T16:56:45Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationOXBORROW, L. and BRINDLEY, C.,(2014.) Disintermediation in the apparel supply chain., Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal.Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, 18 (3), pp. 252-268.en
dc.identifier.issn13612026-
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/JFMM-10-2011-0071-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621335-
dc.description.abstractPurpose The apparel industry has acted as a microcosm of global industrial change, exemplified by changes in structure, relationships and technologies. The purpose of this paper is to identify the risk drivers, the changing supply strategies and the relationships suppliers are developing or exiting from, notably because of the increasing power of retailers in the fast fashion sector. Design/methodology/approach The research adopts a qualitative, case study methodology of the Leicester (UK) based suppliers who operate in the fast fashion market. Findings Rich narrative data shows that the apparel supply chain has changed. The small and medium size enterprises (SMEs) have had more success in managing the upstream rather than the downstream, supported by their move towards a more design driven system. This willingness has been motivated by their wish to "own" the relationship with the buyer but this has not always resulted in greater power or returns and relationships have continued to be fractious. Research limitations/implications There is a lack of research on supply chains, especially, apparel supply chains that focus on reality rather than best practice. This paper addresses the power relationships that are exerted in the supply chain and the cultural aspects that influence them, which have hitherto lacked academic focus. Originality/value Adds empirical data to the theoretical work in the area, specifically, the shape of SME supply chains and the nature of risk in supplying fast fashion. It identifies the unequal power base of the supply chain and SMEs strategies for coping, or not, to some extent dependent on their culture.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing Limiteden
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JFMM-10-2011-0071en
dc.subjectSupply chainen
dc.subjectSmall to medium-sized enterprisesen
dc.subjectFashionen
dc.subjectApparelen
dc.titleDisintermediation in the apparel supply chainen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentNottingham Trent Universityen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journalen
dc.right.copyright� Emerald Group Publishing Limited 2014en
All Items in UDORA are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.