Behind the confession: Relating false confession, interrogative compliance, personality traits, and psychopathy

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621286
Title:
Behind the confession: Relating false confession, interrogative compliance, personality traits, and psychopathy
Authors:
Larmour, Simon R.; Bergstrom, Henriette; Gillen, Christopher T. A.; Forth, Adelle E.
Abstract:
The present study further supports the established notion that personality traits contribute to the phenomenon of false confessions and compliance in an interrogative setting. Furthermore, the study provides an investigation into the more recent interest in the potential effect of psychopathic traits in this context. A sample of university students (N = 607) completed questionnaires measuring psychopathic traits, interrogative compliance, and the big five personality factors. Of these, only 4.9% (n=30) claimed to have falsely confessed to an academic or criminal offense, with no participant taking the blame for both types of offense. Across measures the big five personality traits were the strongest predictors of compliance. The five personality traits accounted for 17.9 % of the total variance in compliance, with neuroticism being the strongest predictor, followed by openness and agreeableness. Psychopathy accounted for 3.3% of variance, with the lifestyle facet being the only significant predictor. After controlling for the big five personality factors, psychopathy only accounted for a small percentage of interrogative compliance, indicating that interrogators should take into account a person’s personality traits during the interrogation.
Affiliation:
Carleton University; Institute of Criminology
Citation:
Larmour, S. R. et al (2015) 'Behind the Confession: Relating False Confession, Interrogative Compliance, Personality Traits, and Psychopathy', Journal of Police and Criminal Psychology, 30 (2):94
Publisher:
Springer
Journal:
Journal of Police and Criminal Psychology
Issue Date:
2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621286
DOI:
10.1007/s11896-014-9144-3
Additional Links:
http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11896-014-9144-3
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
8820783
EISSN:
19366469
Sponsors:
N/A
Appears in Collections:
Department of Social Sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLarmour, Simon R.en
dc.contributor.authorBergstrom, Henrietteen
dc.contributor.authorGillen, Christopher T. A.en
dc.contributor.authorForth, Adelle E.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-25T09:27:54Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-25T09:27:54Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationLarmour, S. R. et al (2015) 'Behind the Confession: Relating False Confession, Interrogative Compliance, Personality Traits, and Psychopathy', Journal of Police and Criminal Psychology, 30 (2):94en
dc.identifier.issn8820783-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11896-014-9144-3-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621286en
dc.description.abstractThe present study further supports the established notion that personality traits contribute to the phenomenon of false confessions and compliance in an interrogative setting. Furthermore, the study provides an investigation into the more recent interest in the potential effect of psychopathic traits in this context. A sample of university students (N = 607) completed questionnaires measuring psychopathic traits, interrogative compliance, and the big five personality factors. Of these, only 4.9% (n=30) claimed to have falsely confessed to an academic or criminal offense, with no participant taking the blame for both types of offense. Across measures the big five personality traits were the strongest predictors of compliance. The five personality traits accounted for 17.9 % of the total variance in compliance, with neuroticism being the strongest predictor, followed by openness and agreeableness. Psychopathy accounted for 3.3% of variance, with the lifestyle facet being the only significant predictor. After controlling for the big five personality factors, psychopathy only accounted for a small percentage of interrogative compliance, indicating that interrogators should take into account a person’s personality traits during the interrogation.en
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11896-014-9144-3en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Police and Criminal Psychologyen
dc.subjectTaking the blameen
dc.subjectPsychopathyen
dc.subjectInterrogative complianceen
dc.subjectFalse confessionen
dc.subjectPersonality traitsen
dc.titleBehind the confession: Relating false confession, interrogative compliance, personality traits, and psychopathyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn19366469-
dc.contributor.departmentCarleton Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute of Criminologyen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Police and Criminal Psychologyen
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