Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621228
Title:
Housing infrastructure: contemporary issues in timber adoption
Authors:
Omoregie, Alohan; English, Mark
Abstract:
Scotland currently has 76·7% of all implemented timber-framed buildings in the UK housing market. England’s figure is 16%. The English contribution is considered relatively low given its demand for more sustainable, low-cost social housing. The aim of this study is to investigate potential contemporary barriers to the adoption of timber as a primary structural material in residential housing developments in England. The research methodology is quantitative and findings revealed that a combination of economic, cultural and psychological issues rather than technical and durability performance are responsible. These are fundamentally due to lack of education regarding the use of timber, erroneously perceived increased maintenance costs of timber housing, developers’ influence and monopoly over timber technology, uncertainty in property resale value and the recent overall lack of confidence in timber technology. It is recommended that improved training comprising compulsory basic timber technology and sustainable construction is adopted as a formal prerequisite for the attainment of relevant qualifications within the built environment, civil engineering and architecture. To this end, the benefits of sustainable construction, specifically, timber, in housing should be introduced even at the pre-university level, within schools and colleges. Also recommended are public awareness campaigns through relevant institutions, in the public and private sectors and among construction professionals, of the merits and misconceptions surrounding timber technology.
Affiliation:
University of Derby; Newcastle College; Leeds Beckett University
Citation:
Omoregie, A. and English, M. (2016) 'Housing infrastructure: contemporary issues in timber adoption', Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Municipal Engineer, DOI: 10.1680/jmuen.16.00022
Publisher:
ICE Publishing
Journal:
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Municipal Engineer
Issue Date:
Dec-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621228
DOI:
10.1680/jmuen.16.00022
Additional Links:
http://www.icevirtuallibrary.com/doi/abs/10.1680/jmuen.16.00022
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
09650903
EISSN:
17517699
Sponsors:
N/A
Appears in Collections:
Department of Mechanical Engineering & the Built Environment

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOmoregie, Alohanen
dc.contributor.authorEnglish, Marken
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-05T15:18:50Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-05T15:18:50Z-
dc.date.issued2016-12-
dc.identifier.citationOmoregie, A. and English, M. (2016) 'Housing infrastructure: contemporary issues in timber adoption', Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Municipal Engineer, DOI: 10.1680/jmuen.16.00022en
dc.identifier.issn09650903-
dc.identifier.doi10.1680/jmuen.16.00022-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621228-
dc.description.abstractScotland currently has 76·7% of all implemented timber-framed buildings in the UK housing market. England’s figure is 16%. The English contribution is considered relatively low given its demand for more sustainable, low-cost social housing. The aim of this study is to investigate potential contemporary barriers to the adoption of timber as a primary structural material in residential housing developments in England. The research methodology is quantitative and findings revealed that a combination of economic, cultural and psychological issues rather than technical and durability performance are responsible. These are fundamentally due to lack of education regarding the use of timber, erroneously perceived increased maintenance costs of timber housing, developers’ influence and monopoly over timber technology, uncertainty in property resale value and the recent overall lack of confidence in timber technology. It is recommended that improved training comprising compulsory basic timber technology and sustainable construction is adopted as a formal prerequisite for the attainment of relevant qualifications within the built environment, civil engineering and architecture. To this end, the benefits of sustainable construction, specifically, timber, in housing should be introduced even at the pre-university level, within schools and colleges. Also recommended are public awareness campaigns through relevant institutions, in the public and private sectors and among construction professionals, of the merits and misconceptions surrounding timber technology.en
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherICE Publishingen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.icevirtuallibrary.com/doi/abs/10.1680/jmuen.16.00022en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectBuildingsen
dc.subjectInfrastructure planningen
dc.subjectStructuresen
dc.subjectDesignen
dc.subjectTimber structuresen
dc.titleHousing infrastructure: contemporary issues in timber adoptionen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn17517699-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.contributor.departmentNewcastle Collegeen
dc.contributor.departmentLeeds Beckett Universityen
dc.identifier.journalProceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Municipal Engineeren
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