Training the inspiratory muscles improves running performance when carrying a 25 kg thoracic load in a backpack.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621200
Title:
Training the inspiratory muscles improves running performance when carrying a 25 kg thoracic load in a backpack.
Authors:
Faghy, Mark ( 0000-0002-8163-7032 ) ; Brown, Peter I.
Abstract:
Load carriage (LC) exercise in physically demanding occupations is typically characterised by periods of low-intensity steady-state exercise and short duration, high-intensity exercise while carrying an external mass in a backpack; this form of exercise is also known as LC exercise. This induces inspiratory muscle fatigue and reduces whole-body performance. Accordingly we investigated the effect of inspiratory muscle training (IMT, 50% maximal inspiratory muscle pressure (PImax) twice daily for six week) upon running time-trial performance with thoracic LC. Nineteen healthy males formed a pressure threshold IMT (n = 10) or placebo control group (PLA; n = 9) and performed 60 min LC exercise (6.5 km h(-1)) followed by a 2.4 km running time trial (LCTT) either side of a double-blind six week intervention. Prior to the intervention, PImax was reduced relative to baseline, post-LC and post-LCTT in both groups (pooled data: 13 ± 7% and 16 ± 8%, respectively, p < .05) and similar changes were observed post-PLA. Post-IMT only, resting PImax increased +31% (p < .05) and relative to pre-IMT was greater post-LC (+19%) and post-LCTT (+18%, p < .05), however, the relative reduction in PImax at each time point was unchanged (13 ± 11% and 17 ± 9%, respectively, p > .05). In IMT only, heart rate and perceptual responses were reduced post-LC (p < .05). Time-trial performance was unchanged post-PLA and improved 8 ± 4% after IMT (p < .05). In summary, when wearing a 25 kg backpack, IMT attenuated the cardiovascular and perceptual responses to steady-state exercise and improved high-intensity time-trial performance which we attribute in part to reduced relative work intensity of the inspiratory muscles due to improved inspiratory muscle strength. These findings have real-world implications for occupational contexts.
Affiliation:
University of Derby
Citation:
Faghy, M. et al (2016) 'Training the inspiratory muscles improves running performance when carrying a 25 kg thoracic load in a backpack'. European Journal of Sport Science, 16 (5):585-94.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Journal:
European journal of sport science
Issue Date:
2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621200
DOI:
10.1080/17461391.2015.1071878
PubMed ID:
26274785
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17461391.2015.1071878
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
15367290
Sponsors:
N/A
Appears in Collections:
Department of Life Sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFaghy, Marken
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Peter I.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-20T11:38:34Z-
dc.date.available2016-12-20T11:38:34Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationFaghy, M. et al (2016) 'Training the inspiratory muscles improves running performance when carrying a 25 kg thoracic load in a backpack'. European Journal of Sport Science, 16 (5):585-94.en
dc.identifier.issn15367290-
dc.identifier.pmid26274785-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17461391.2015.1071878-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621200-
dc.description.abstractLoad carriage (LC) exercise in physically demanding occupations is typically characterised by periods of low-intensity steady-state exercise and short duration, high-intensity exercise while carrying an external mass in a backpack; this form of exercise is also known as LC exercise. This induces inspiratory muscle fatigue and reduces whole-body performance. Accordingly we investigated the effect of inspiratory muscle training (IMT, 50% maximal inspiratory muscle pressure (PImax) twice daily for six week) upon running time-trial performance with thoracic LC. Nineteen healthy males formed a pressure threshold IMT (n = 10) or placebo control group (PLA; n = 9) and performed 60 min LC exercise (6.5 km h(-1)) followed by a 2.4 km running time trial (LCTT) either side of a double-blind six week intervention. Prior to the intervention, PImax was reduced relative to baseline, post-LC and post-LCTT in both groups (pooled data: 13 ± 7% and 16 ± 8%, respectively, p < .05) and similar changes were observed post-PLA. Post-IMT only, resting PImax increased +31% (p < .05) and relative to pre-IMT was greater post-LC (+19%) and post-LCTT (+18%, p < .05), however, the relative reduction in PImax at each time point was unchanged (13 ± 11% and 17 ± 9%, respectively, p > .05). In IMT only, heart rate and perceptual responses were reduced post-LC (p < .05). Time-trial performance was unchanged post-PLA and improved 8 ± 4% after IMT (p < .05). In summary, when wearing a 25 kg backpack, IMT attenuated the cardiovascular and perceptual responses to steady-state exercise and improved high-intensity time-trial performance which we attribute in part to reduced relative work intensity of the inspiratory muscles due to improved inspiratory muscle strength. These findings have real-world implications for occupational contexts.en
dc.description.sponsorshipN/Aen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17461391.2015.1071878en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to European journal of sport scienceen
dc.subjectRespiratory systemen
dc.subjectRespiratory muscle trainingen
dc.subjectFatigueen
dc.subjectLoad carriageen
dc.titleTraining the inspiratory muscles improves running performance when carrying a 25 kg thoracic load in a backpack.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalEuropean journal of sport scienceen
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