Linking languages: Realigning design vocabularies [Editorial]

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621176
Title:
Linking languages: Realigning design vocabularies [Editorial]
Authors:
Oddey, Alison ( 0000-0001-8585-2867 ) ; Benedetto, Stephen Di; White, Christine
Abstract:
A crowded gallery, a theatre in the round or the backroom of a local pub can become more than a destination. These spaces are transformed when a group of people come together to share an experience, whether it is to view a display of Enlightenment curiosities, a representation of the pit of history or the history of the Canadian nation. Each space contains an event, which is designed, planned for, shaped and presented, to impart some mediated experience. Much of the vocabulary we use to describe the elements and principles for shaping the scene are a result of inherited assumptions made popular in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. The challenges that have evolved with technologies have exerted tensions and pressures on some of the vocabularies we use, in order to describe the organization of scenes. Our relationship to the world is framed by our exposure to ubiquitous experiences and technological interactions. Our vocabularies and languages to describe technologies and discoveries maintain a static language even when a visual organization influenced by an ‘Ap’ icon is drastically different from those of the early industrial age. While our aspirations for creating artwork that challenges the world as it is, remains constant, our conception of what constitutes effective expression has changed.
Affiliation:
University of Derby
Citation:
Oddey, A. et al (2013) 'Linking languages: Realigning design vocabularies; [Editorial], Scene, 1 (3):325
Publisher:
Intellect
Journal:
Scene
Issue Date:
1-Dec-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621176
DOI:
10.1386/scene.1.3.325_2
Additional Links:
http://openurl.ingenta.com/content/xref?genre=article&issn=2044-3714&volume=1&issue=3&spage=325
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
20443714; 20443722
Appears in Collections:
D-Marc

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOddey, Alisonen
dc.contributor.authorBenedetto, Stephen Dien
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Christineen
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-15T14:43:10Z-
dc.date.available2016-12-15T14:43:10Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-01-
dc.identifier.citationOddey, A. et al (2013) 'Linking languages: Realigning design vocabularies; [Editorial], Scene, 1 (3):325en
dc.identifier.issn20443714-
dc.identifier.issn20443722-
dc.identifier.doi10.1386/scene.1.3.325_2-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621176-
dc.description.abstractA crowded gallery, a theatre in the round or the backroom of a local pub can become more than a destination. These spaces are transformed when a group of people come together to share an experience, whether it is to view a display of Enlightenment curiosities, a representation of the pit of history or the history of the Canadian nation. Each space contains an event, which is designed, planned for, shaped and presented, to impart some mediated experience. Much of the vocabulary we use to describe the elements and principles for shaping the scene are a result of inherited assumptions made popular in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. The challenges that have evolved with technologies have exerted tensions and pressures on some of the vocabularies we use, in order to describe the organization of scenes. Our relationship to the world is framed by our exposure to ubiquitous experiences and technological interactions. Our vocabularies and languages to describe technologies and discoveries maintain a static language even when a visual organization influenced by an ‘Ap’ icon is drastically different from those of the early industrial age. While our aspirations for creating artwork that challenges the world as it is, remains constant, our conception of what constitutes effective expression has changed.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIntellecten
dc.relation.urlhttp://openurl.ingenta.com/content/xref?genre=article&issn=2044-3714&volume=1&issue=3&spage=325en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Sceneen
dc.subjectMuseumen
dc.subjectContemporary designen
dc.subjectExpressionen
dc.subjectLanguageen
dc.subjectLanguage and social interactionen
dc.titleLinking languages: Realigning design vocabularies [Editorial]en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalSceneen
All Items in UDORA are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.