Combined degrees & employability: a comparative analysis of single and joint honours graduates of UK universities.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621167
Title:
Combined degrees & employability: a comparative analysis of single and joint honours graduates of UK universities.
Authors:
Pigden, Louise ( 0000-0002-9749-7855 ) ; Jegede, Francis ( 0000-0003-3053-3353 )
Abstract:
Over the last decade, there has been an increase in the popularity and number of combined or joint degrees in English and Welsh Universities. Combined or joint honours represent 10% of all undergraduates. 50,000 out of 500,000 currently enrolled on all honours degrees. This significant and special way of learning therefore warrants scrutiny. Combined degrees enable students to enroll on two or more subjects, with varying levels of integration of the courses, which leads to either a BA or BSc honours joint award. The growing number of students on such degrees across universities in England and Wales has led to a debate as to the intrinsic value of such degrees especially in relation to graduate employability and career opportunities. This paper examines the nature and relative attractiveness of combined degrees and explores the employability of combined honours degree graduates in comparison with single honours degree graduates.
Affiliation:
University of Derby
Citation:
Pigden, L. and Jegede, F. (2016) 'Combined degrees & employability: a comparative analysis of single and joint honours graduates of UK universities', West East Journal of Social Sciences, 5 (2).
Publisher:
West East Institute
Journal:
West East Journal of Social Sciences
Issue Date:
Aug-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621167
Additional Links:
https://westeastinstitute.com/journals/wejss-august-2016/
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Series/Report no.:
WEJSS-AUGUST-1603
ISSN:
21687315
Appears in Collections:
Department of Mechanical Engineering & the Built Environment; Department of Social Sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPigden, Louiseen
dc.contributor.authorJegede, Francisen
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-15T10:09:13Z-
dc.date.available2016-12-15T10:09:13Z-
dc.date.issued2016-08-
dc.identifier.citationPigden, L. and Jegede, F. (2016) 'Combined degrees & employability: a comparative analysis of single and joint honours graduates of UK universities', West East Journal of Social Sciences, 5 (2).en
dc.identifier.issn21687315-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621167-
dc.description.abstractOver the last decade, there has been an increase in the popularity and number of combined or joint degrees in English and Welsh Universities. Combined or joint honours represent 10% of all undergraduates. 50,000 out of 500,000 currently enrolled on all honours degrees. This significant and special way of learning therefore warrants scrutiny. Combined degrees enable students to enroll on two or more subjects, with varying levels of integration of the courses, which leads to either a BA or BSc honours joint award. The growing number of students on such degrees across universities in England and Wales has led to a debate as to the intrinsic value of such degrees especially in relation to graduate employability and career opportunities. This paper examines the nature and relative attractiveness of combined degrees and explores the employability of combined honours degree graduates in comparison with single honours degree graduates.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWest East Instituteen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWEJSS-AUGUST-1603en
dc.relation.urlhttps://westeastinstitute.com/journals/wejss-august-2016/en
dc.subjectJoint Honours Degreeen
dc.subjectEmployabilityen
dc.subjectCombined honoursen
dc.titleCombined degrees & employability: a comparative analysis of single and joint honours graduates of UK universities.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.identifier.journalWest East Journal of Social Sciencesen
dc.right.copyright2016 West East Instituteen
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