Do therapeutic imagery practices affect physiological and emotional indicators of threat in high self-critics?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621100
Title:
Do therapeutic imagery practices affect physiological and emotional indicators of threat in high self-critics?
Authors:
Duarte, Joana; McEwan, Kirsten ( 0000-0002-0945-0521 ) ; Barnes, Christopher ( 0000-0001-8318-4412 ) ; Gilbert, Paul ( 0000-0001-8431-9892 ) ; Maratos, Frances A. ( 0000-0001-5738-6491 )
Abstract:
Objectives: Imagery is known to be a powerful means of stimulating various physiological processes and is increasingly used within standard psychological therapies. Compassion-focused imagery (CFI) has been used to stimulate affiliative emotion in people with mental health problems. However, evidence suggests that self-critical individuals may have particular difficulties in this domain with single trials. The aim of the present study was to further investigate the role of self-criticism in responsiveness to CFI by specifically pre-selecting participants based on trait self-criticism. Design: Using the Forms of Self-Criticism/Self-Reassuring Scale, 29 individuals from a total sample of 139 were pre-selected to determine how self-criticism impacts upon an initial instance of imagery. Methods: All participants took part in three activities: a control imagery intervention (useable data N = 25), a standard CFI intervention (useable data N = 25), and a non-intervention control (useable data N = 24). Physiological measurements (alpha amylase) as well as questionnaire measures of emotional responding (i.e., the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, the Types of Positive Affect Scale, and the State Adult Attachment Scale) were taken before and after the different interventions. Results: Following both imagery interventions, repeated measures analyses revealed that alpha amylase increased significantly for high self-critics compared with low self-critics. High self-critics (HSC) also reported greater insecurity on entering the imagery session and more negative CFI experiences compared with low self-critics. Practitioner Points: Data demonstrate that HSC respond negatively to imagery interventions in a single trial. This highlights that imagery focused therapies (e.g., CFI) need interventions that manage fears, blocks, and resistances to the techniques, particularly in HSC. An initial instance of imagery (e.g., CFI) can be frightening for people who have a tendency to be self-critical. This research provides examples of physiological and emotional responses to imagery type therapies in high and low self-critics, and associated clinical implications. Therapists may find it helpful to be mindful that when introducing imagery based therapies, highly self-critical patients need interventions that manage fears, blocks, and resistances to the techniques.
Affiliation:
University of Coimbra; University of Derby; Cardiff University
Citation:
Duarte, J. (2015) 'Do therapeutic imagery practices affect physiological and emotional indicators of threat in high self-critics?' Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice, 88 (3):270
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice
Issue Date:
Sep-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621100
DOI:
10.1111/papt.12043
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/papt.12043
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1476-0835
Appears in Collections:
Centre for Psychological Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDuarte, Joanaen
dc.contributor.authorMcEwan, Kirstenen
dc.contributor.authorBarnes, Christopheren
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, Paulen
dc.contributor.authorMaratos, Frances A.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-02T11:35:53Z-
dc.date.available2016-12-02T11:35:53Z-
dc.date.issued2015-09-
dc.identifier.citationDuarte, J. (2015) 'Do therapeutic imagery practices affect physiological and emotional indicators of threat in high self-critics?' Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice, 88 (3):270en
dc.identifier.issn1476-0835-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/papt.12043-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621100-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Imagery is known to be a powerful means of stimulating various physiological processes and is increasingly used within standard psychological therapies. Compassion-focused imagery (CFI) has been used to stimulate affiliative emotion in people with mental health problems. However, evidence suggests that self-critical individuals may have particular difficulties in this domain with single trials. The aim of the present study was to further investigate the role of self-criticism in responsiveness to CFI by specifically pre-selecting participants based on trait self-criticism. Design: Using the Forms of Self-Criticism/Self-Reassuring Scale, 29 individuals from a total sample of 139 were pre-selected to determine how self-criticism impacts upon an initial instance of imagery. Methods: All participants took part in three activities: a control imagery intervention (useable data N = 25), a standard CFI intervention (useable data N = 25), and a non-intervention control (useable data N = 24). Physiological measurements (alpha amylase) as well as questionnaire measures of emotional responding (i.e., the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, the Types of Positive Affect Scale, and the State Adult Attachment Scale) were taken before and after the different interventions. Results: Following both imagery interventions, repeated measures analyses revealed that alpha amylase increased significantly for high self-critics compared with low self-critics. High self-critics (HSC) also reported greater insecurity on entering the imagery session and more negative CFI experiences compared with low self-critics. Practitioner Points: Data demonstrate that HSC respond negatively to imagery interventions in a single trial. This highlights that imagery focused therapies (e.g., CFI) need interventions that manage fears, blocks, and resistances to the techniques, particularly in HSC. An initial instance of imagery (e.g., CFI) can be frightening for people who have a tendency to be self-critical. This research provides examples of physiological and emotional responses to imagery type therapies in high and low self-critics, and associated clinical implications. Therapists may find it helpful to be mindful that when introducing imagery based therapies, highly self-critical patients need interventions that manage fears, blocks, and resistances to the techniques.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/papt.12043en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practiceen
dc.subjectAlpha amylaseen
dc.subjectImageryen
dc.subjectCompassion-focused imagery (CFI)en
dc.subjectSelf-criticismen
dc.subjectThreaten
dc.subjectWell-beingen
dc.subjectAnxious respondingen
dc.titleDo therapeutic imagery practices affect physiological and emotional indicators of threat in high self-critics?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Coimbraen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.contributor.departmentCardiff Universityen
dc.identifier.journalPsychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practiceen
dc.contributor.institutionCognitive and Behavioural Centre for Research and Intervention; University of Coimbra; Portugal-
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute of Primary Care and Population Health; School of Medicine; Cardiff University; Wales UK-
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology; College of Life and Natural Sciences; University of Derby; UK-
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology; College of Life and Natural Sciences; University of Derby; UK-
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychology; College of Life and Natural Sciences; University of Derby; UK-
All Items in UDORA are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.