An assessment of the relative influence of pain coping, negative thoughts about pain, and pain acceptance on health-related quality of life among people with hemophilia

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621097
Title:
An assessment of the relative influence of pain coping, negative thoughts about pain, and pain acceptance on health-related quality of life among people with hemophilia
Authors:
Elander, James ( 0000-0001-7665-5482 ) ; Robinson, Georgina; Mitchell, Kathryn; Morris, John
Abstract:
Many people with hemophilia are affected by chronic arthritic joint pain as well as acute bleeding pain. In this cross-sectional study, 209 men with hemophilia A or B completed the Hemophilia Pain Coping Questionnaire (HPCQ), the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (CPAQ), and the RAND 36-item Health Survey (SF-36), a measure of health-related quality of life. Multiple regression was used to test the influence of active pain coping, passive adherence coping, and negative thoughts about pain (HPCQ scales), and activity engagement and pain willingness (CPAQ scales), on physical and mental components of quality of life (SF-36 PCS and MCS scales), taking account of age, hemophilia severity, use of clotting factor, and pain intensity. Pain intensity was the main influence on physical quality of life and negative thoughts was the main influence on mental quality of life. Activity engagement and pain willingness had small but significant influences on physical and mental quality of life. Pain willingness also moderated and partly mediated the influence of pain intensity on physical quality of life, and activity engagement and pain willingness mediated the influence of negative thoughts on mental quality of life. Negative thoughts moderated and partly mediated the influence of pain intensity on mental quality of life. There was no evidence that active pain coping influenced quality of life. The findings suggest that quality of life in hemophilia could potentially be improved by interventions to increase pain acceptance and reduce negative thoughts about pain, especially among those with less severe pain.
Affiliation:
University of Derby; University of West London; Katherine Dormandy Trust
Citation:
Elander, J. et al (2009) 'An assessment of the relative influence of pain coping, negative thoughts about pain, and pain acceptance on health-related quality of life among people with hemophilia', Pain, 145 (1):169
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Pain
Issue Date:
Sep-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10545/621097
DOI:
10.1016/j.pain.2009.06.004
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304395909003297
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0304-3959
Sponsors:
Haemophilia Society UK; Institute for Health Policy and Research, London Metropolitan University.
Appears in Collections:
Centre for Psychological Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorElander, Jamesen
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, Georginaen
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Kathrynen
dc.contributor.authorMorris, Johnen
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-02T11:14:58Z-
dc.date.available2016-12-02T11:14:58Z-
dc.date.issued2009-09-
dc.identifier.citationElander, J. et al (2009) 'An assessment of the relative influence of pain coping, negative thoughts about pain, and pain acceptance on health-related quality of life among people with hemophilia', Pain, 145 (1):169en
dc.identifier.issn0304-3959-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.pain.2009.06.004-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10545/621097-
dc.description.abstractMany people with hemophilia are affected by chronic arthritic joint pain as well as acute bleeding pain. In this cross-sectional study, 209 men with hemophilia A or B completed the Hemophilia Pain Coping Questionnaire (HPCQ), the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (CPAQ), and the RAND 36-item Health Survey (SF-36), a measure of health-related quality of life. Multiple regression was used to test the influence of active pain coping, passive adherence coping, and negative thoughts about pain (HPCQ scales), and activity engagement and pain willingness (CPAQ scales), on physical and mental components of quality of life (SF-36 PCS and MCS scales), taking account of age, hemophilia severity, use of clotting factor, and pain intensity. Pain intensity was the main influence on physical quality of life and negative thoughts was the main influence on mental quality of life. Activity engagement and pain willingness had small but significant influences on physical and mental quality of life. Pain willingness also moderated and partly mediated the influence of pain intensity on physical quality of life, and activity engagement and pain willingness mediated the influence of negative thoughts on mental quality of life. Negative thoughts moderated and partly mediated the influence of pain intensity on mental quality of life. There was no evidence that active pain coping influenced quality of life. The findings suggest that quality of life in hemophilia could potentially be improved by interventions to increase pain acceptance and reduce negative thoughts about pain, especially among those with less severe pain.en
dc.description.sponsorshipHaemophilia Society UK; Institute for Health Policy and Research, London Metropolitan University.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304395909003297en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Painen
dc.subjectHemophiliaen
dc.subjectPain copingen
dc.subjectPain acceptanceen
dc.subjectJoint painen
dc.subjectNegative thoughtsen
dc.subjectQuality of lifeen
dc.titleAn assessment of the relative influence of pain coping, negative thoughts about pain, and pain acceptance on health-related quality of life among people with hemophiliaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Derbyen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of West Londonen
dc.contributor.departmentKatherine Dormandy Trusten
dc.identifier.journalPainen
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